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EarZ

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #1 
I've had hyperacusis symptoms for the past week now.  I was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia 4 months ago and have since had ear ringing, pressure, pain, and now H.  

I have a simple question - what sounds should I avoid?  From what I read, during the initial period you should let your ears "heal" a little and then possibly start some retraining therapy.  

Most everyday sounds are louder than they were before and a lot of them "echo" in my head or make me anticipate pain when they happen.  Only the loudest ones pain my ears.

I mean, the sound of running water should not damage my ears, but it sure sounds loud. My kids screaming, now that is really loud and is probably one I should avoid for now.

So, where is the line drawn?  Should I just avoid the "real" damaging sounds?  Or the everyday sounds that now sound louder?

Thanks..

EarZ

__________________
7/20/14 - Occipital Neuralgia Diagnosis 

9/4/14 - Tinnitus, Pain, and Pressure start

11/4/14 - Sensitivity to Sound starts (Hyperacusis?)



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EarZ

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks Tainee.  

I have a 3 yr old and a 1.5 year old.  They scream and cry.  I also have a dachsund that yelps so loud it could kill you.  

Looks like I'll be wearing head gear at home all the time. [frown]

EarZ

__________________
7/20/14 - Occipital Neuralgia Diagnosis 

9/4/14 - Tinnitus, Pain, and Pressure start

11/4/14 - Sensitivity to Sound starts (Hyperacusis?)



0
Paulbe

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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #3 
Don't be sentimental. get rid of the dachshund.  Harsh, but you may regret not doing so.  At this point you need to assert at least some control over your own environment, and this is one thing you can do, even if its difficult.  There are plenty of trainable, quiet dogs out there.
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #4 
I disagree. You should learn how to treat your sound sensitivity problem and seek professional help. If you want to increase your tolerances to sound you will work at exposing yourself more sounds you can tolerate well. Use sound enrichment, like pleasant nature sounds, especially at night, at a level that is comfortable. Don't quit going outside ... Go to places that are not to loud for you. Take walks in nature ... Ears need practice with sounds.

Don't isolate yourself, and try to stay positive.

Anyway, people with hyperacusis tend to associate their symptoms and pain with damage. That is a terrible mistake. I'm not saying you should hurt yourself, but ears do get hurt now and then unless you isolate yourself indoors.

Do avoid excessive noise like clubs, loud movies, live music events, sporting events. Those can make hyperacusis worse.

You can read more about sound enrichment and TRT on this site: http://www.tinnitus.org

General idea is to try, and not anticipate problems. And do sound therapy like sound enrichment. And seek professional help!

People don't get rid of their crying or screaming kids. People find a way to manage it, perhaps using ear protection for short periods. But don't use ear protection excessely.

Believe me, there is a path forward for most everyone and even those that don't increase their tolerances usually find a way to manage their condition and keep living.

So, stay positive, and don't anticipate problems and avoid all sounds. TRT is avoidance in reverse!
1
Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #5 
I just read your whole post, I wasn't suggesting you would get rid of your kids! I saw the post about the dog and made the analogy. Anyway, yeah kids can be loud abut sometimes there is no avoiding sounds that hurt. Perhaps you can use ear protection for short periods when they are loud, but not for long times!
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tainee
I found that exposing myself to so-called loud noise was a losing battle. But by all means, benefit from pleasant sounds that keep your ears pricked up.
Tainee


Maybe you didn't get the right help. But Hyperacusis is treatable and most people do get better with good help.
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EarZ

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
I disagree. You should learn how to treat your sound sensitivity problem and seek professional help. If you want to increase your tolerances to sound you will work at exposing yourself more sounds you can tolerate well. Use sound enrichment, like pleasant nature sounds, especially at night, at a level that is comfortable. Don't quit going outside ... Go to places that are not to loud for you. Take walks in nature ... Ears need practice with sounds.

Don't isolate yourself, and try to stay positive.

Anyway, people with hyperacusis tend to associate their symptoms and pain with damage. That is a terrible mistake. I'm not saying you should hurt yourself, but ears do get hurt now and then unless you isolate yourself indoors.

Do avoid excessive noise like clubs, loud movies, live music events, sporting events. Those can make hyperacusis worse.

You can read more about sound enrichment and TRT on this site: http://www.tinnitus.org

General idea is to try, and not anticipate problems. And do sound therapy like sound enrichment. And seek professional help!

People don't get rid of their crying or screaming kids. People find a way to manage it, perhaps using ear protection for short periods. But don't use ear protection excessely.

Believe me, there is a path forward for most everyone and even those that don't increase their tolerances usually find a way to manage their condition and keep living.

So, stay positive, and don't anticipate problems and avoid all sounds. TRT is avoidance in reverse!



Thanks! So the basic takeaway here is that normal, everyday sounds won't damage the ear. I will be seeking professional help as soon as possible. I found someone (the only one) in my state that has been trained in TRT (Jastreboff). I'm seeing a neuro-otologist this week as well to get a firm diagnosis and steps to move forward

__________________
7/20/14 - Occipital Neuralgia Diagnosis 

9/4/14 - Tinnitus, Pain, and Pressure start

11/4/14 - Sensitivity to Sound starts (Hyperacusis?)



0
EarZ

Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tainee
I found that exposing myself to so-called loud noise was a losing battle. But by all means, benefit from pleasant sounds that keep your ears pricked up.
Tainee


Maybe you didn't get the right help. But Hyperacusis is treatable and most people do get better with good help.


Also, I read your story. Thanks for telling it. It gives me hope that I can move forward successfully with treatment.

I have no idea how my hyperacusis started really. I was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia (nerve condition) about 4 months ago and then 6 weeks later - BAM! Ear issues out the wazoo. I have pressure, ringing, and some pain almost constantly, and then about a week ago the hyperacusis started.

There's conflicting info online as to what to do about sound. I believe the TRT theory is the correct one.

__________________
7/20/14 - Occipital Neuralgia Diagnosis 

9/4/14 - Tinnitus, Pain, and Pressure start

11/4/14 - Sensitivity to Sound starts (Hyperacusis?)



0
Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks EarZ,

Yeah, normal everyday won't damage ears. You will likely have ups and downs and times when you need to take it easy with sounds, and that's fine. Just stay positive, and keep trying.

That's too bad about the occipital neuralgia. Is that getting any better for ya? Johnathan Hazell said most people can make progress with hyperacusis regardless of the cause.

Hang in there and do the things you can. Many listening to music for a period everyday at a comfortable level helpful, say an hour or so.
0
EarZ

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Thanks EarZ, Yeah, normal everyday won't damage ears. You will likely have ups and downs and times when you need to take it easy with sounds, and that's fine. Just stay positive, and keep trying. That's too bad about the occipital neuralgia. Is that getting any better for ya? Johnathan Hazell said most people can make progress with hyperacusis regardless of the cause. Hang in there and do the things you can. Many listening to music for a period everyday at a comfortable level helpful, say an hour or so.


Treating the ON now as well.  It's under control but not healed. How is your condition now?

__________________
7/20/14 - Occipital Neuralgia Diagnosis 

9/4/14 - Tinnitus, Pain, and Pressure start

11/4/14 - Sensitivity to Sound starts (Hyperacusis?)



0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EarZ
Treating the ON now as well.  It's under control but not healed. How is your condition now?


I'm doing quite well, Thanks! Started school again this year, and can do most of what I want sound wise. I have more than just sound sensivity though, and have physical sensitivities as well, but have come sooo far from where I started.
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