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nguyenthanhvu94

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone,

My name is Vu, and I'm from VietNam.

I have just found this useful website/network. I have had a hearing problem for over 10 years (I have to wear hearing-aid) and I recently noticed that I also suffered from hyperacusis (this happened long time ago but I ignored it). I can't stand any noise such as metal falling down, paper wrapping ... Now I'm really in panic because there is no qualified ENT doctor in my country that can help me to deal with this hyperacusis, and travel is impossible for me now. I'm wondering if there is any solution for me now? I read on the website and there is a CD to generate pink noise, but I'm not sure if it is suitable for people how have hearing problem (quite heavy) like me or not? I don't want to make the situation or my hearing any worse. And is there any supplement that can be helpful (like Gingko Bibloba)?

Thank you.
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plumfarmer97

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello Vu,
I understand what you are going through - SO wish I could offer ideas to help. This has been my situation for a couple of years, with addition of tremors that are set off by sounds.  I hope we get a few suggestions here!
Judy in Sacramento



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DanMalcore

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Dan
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Reply with quote  #3 

I don't know if I have hyperacusis or recruitment.  What is the difference? 

Dr. Stephen Nagler has the best advice here.  He states: "There are many misconceptions about hyperacusis and recruitment.  Hearing professionals often oversimplify the concept of recruitment by stating that when hyperacusis occurs in a person with hearing loss, it is "recruitment."  Moreover, you and I have both heard folks with severe hyperacusis claim that "my hyperacusis is so bad that I must have recruitment, too."  In order to answer your question, then, I feel it is very important that these terms are defined properly.  (Or at the very least, that you understand how "I" am defining them. (1)  Hyperacusis is a decreased threshold to discomfort from sound.  It can range from a person who is mildly uncomfortable in a restaurant setting wherein all the rest of the people at the table have no discomfort at all ... to a person who has profound discomfort from many of the sounds encountered in daily life.  TRT and other desensitization techniques can be highly effective in treating hyperacusis.  (2) Recruitment is something completely different.  Recruitment is the rapid growth of perceived loudness for those sounds located in the pitch region of a hearing loss.  (This is Jack Vernon's definition.)  So let me give you an example.  My father had a significant hearing loss for several years before his death at the age of  89.   I could say, "Dad."  He heard nothing, and he of course did not respond.  So I'd say it a bit louder.  Still nothing.  A bit louder than that.  Still nothing.  And then ... just a very tiny bit louder.  The response:  "Stop yelling so loud, Steve, I hear you just fine.  Tone it down a bit, will you!"  And THAT'S recruitment - a *rapid* growth of perceived loudness in a pitch region containing hearing impairment.  (And it is very difficult to convey to a person with significant hearing loss that the time he hears my voice at a level uncomfortable to his ears ... was actually the *fourth* time I tried to get his attention.)  This phenomenon occurs because at some decibel level, the normal hair cells adjacent to the damaged hair cells (corresponding to the frequency of a hearing loss) are "recruited."  At the decibel level at which these normal hair cells "kick in," perceived loudness shoots up rapidly, causing discomfort.  My professional opinion is that TRT and various desensitization protocols do not help in these cases... what is required is hearing aids (with compression, if the recruitment is severe).  BUT - just because a person has some hearing loss and also has sound sensitivity ... it does not mean that the sound sensitivity is due to recruitment.  Hyperacusis can occur in people with hearing loss!  Unfortunately there is no "test" which can be given to a person with hearing loss and sound sensitivity to determine what percentage of the sound sensitivity is actually due to recruitment.  The only thing we can say for certain, in fact, is that if a person has normal hearing, he or she cannot have recruitment.  As a guideline, then, at our clinic if a person with sound sensitivity has a hearing loss not severe enough to warrant hearing aids, we would initially treat that sound sensitivity with TRT or another desensitization protocol.  Even if hearing aids WERE warranted, we would encourage exposure to environmental sound while wearing hearing aids (as in TRT) and only go to compression hearing aids if that approach failed after a concerted effort on both our part and the patient's part

Dan

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Kribu

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Reply with quote  #4 
I also wear hearing aids (well not since my injury) and am in office for second opinion as I type!. My hearing (puretone thresholds-the graph thing) hasn't changed...but my tolerance for volume is impacted so wearing hearing aids is out for now. What I am finding, however, is the exhaustion of focused listening since I have to work harder without my hearing aids...and emotional sequalae around that. (Faking comprehension, misunderstandings, completely missing conversation, feeling stupid or that others will think I'm stupid-irrational, I know) then there's the phantom noises that are just barely audible so you have to figure out if it's real or in your head...yeah, it's exhausting. But sharing with others does help. Welcome!
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plumfarmer97

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Reply with quote  #5 
Two + years of frustration with not just my syndromes, but all the useless specialist appointments, with conditions worsening.
FYI on this thread...   I am over 70, until 3 years ago I was healthy and active and mostly anti-drugs and vegetarian.  I enjoy research, so have looked in every direction that occurs to me. Nothing yet. Have not tried the pink noise CD.
Within a few months in 2014, I was hit by what was diagnosed as Essential Tremors, self-diagnosed  hyperacusis and rapidly decreasing hearing in left ear. MRI showed two benign tumors in brain and aggressive acoustic neuroma in left ear. Several months ago I underwent Gamma Knife radiation to (hopefully) stop the cancer cells. We'll check again next year.
Of course hyperacusis makes MRI unbearable. Even rhythms and most music and some voices set me trembling. My diagnosis is not "essential," but rather psycogenic tremors.
Yes - social gatherings, shopping, walking on the street...all miserable.
Hoping to come across someone with new suggestions!
Judy

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