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weab00

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Reply with quote  #1 
I got tinnitus about a year and a half ago from overexposing my ears to loud music with headphones. I’ve been playing the bass guitar and wanting to start a rock band, but I experience some hyperacusis against mid-high end instruments such as brass and guitar. I also get a ringing against frequencies in the kitchen I work at, like blenders, and clacking dishes can be piercing. I’ve always thought that this ringing was apart of tinnitus for everyone until I looked further into it and discovered hyperacusis, which I fit the symptoms for. I get headaches after headphone use.

I’m only 16 and an aspiring musician, but I feel a little crushed right now after realizing what I have and the ramifications live music and headphones/speakers can have, even with hearing protection. What about listening to music? That was a hobby of mine, but now I’m not so sure [frown] I need some guidance right now, any advice or support is appreciated.
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shattered

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hey, hoss, I'm kinda in the same boat. If you have the standard variety of hyperacusis, TRT can make it more or less inconsequential, or so I've heard. You ever given it a try?
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weab00

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shattered
Hey, hoss, I'm kinda in the same boat. If you have the standard variety of hyperacusis, TRT can make it more or less inconsequential, or so I've heard. You ever given it a try?


No, never. How would that work? Would I listen to it through my phone speakers? I’ve heard that it needs to be at least 2 hours a day to be effective.
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shattered

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yeah, I'm no expert, but I think you could. You learn how to do it from audiologists—I'd recommend looking out for one if you're able.
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DanMalcore

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Dan
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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
I’m only 16 and an aspiring musician, but I feel a little crushed right now after realizing what I have and the ramifications live music and headphones/speakers can have, even with hearing protection. What about listening to music? 


To your point, your ears have clearly had a setback from loud music through those headphones.  Ears are the perfect musical instrument and from now on you need to treat them that way.  You have been given a major warning by what you are experiencing right now.  The good news is that this is treatable but for now you need to put the live music and headphones aside and concentrate on sound therapy with a qualified clinician.  See the referral list on this message board for clinicians who are trained to treat hyperacusis.  They will test your sound tolerances with an LDL test (Loudness Discomfort Level) and put you on a path to recover your decreased sound tolerances (DST) through sound therapy.  

So many individuals waste an extraordinary amount of time doing nothing.  If you want to get better you need to be proactive and find the kind of help you need.  

[wave]Dan

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"Yesterday is ashes, tomorrow is wood, only today does the fire burn brightly"
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #6 
Please listen to Dan.
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