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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #1 
HI, I wrote here some time ago about tensor tympani issues. Those are better although a few sounds (like voices on phone speakers and similar) still make my left ear tympani rumble a little. I've been having tinnitus for about 7 years now, caused by noise exposure, and tensor tympani issues the last 3 years or so. 

Now I'm having lots of trouble with worsened and more reactive than ever tinnitus. I've been going through a pattern the last two years or so in which I'm fine in quiet places (about 40-45 db sound level, quiet room with soft music) but as soon as I'm exposed to 50+db my tinnitus starts raising.

I think I have hyperacusis because, apart from tensor tympani sympthoms, I've been having problems all these 7 years with dishes clanking, sudden noises, children, dogs barking... Those doesn't literally hurt but sound terribly loud and piercing to my ears, and it has been consistently that way from day one, so each year that passed by I started to avoid more and more sounds. These days I'm worse, even the microwave ding sound very loud and I need earplugs for train and buses. 

What I wanted to know is if relative sound deprivation can cause the tinnitus to become louder and more reactive when exposed to normal sound levels, is this normal for hyperacusia or reduced sound tolerance? I've been using soft music for sleep, I'm never in total silence as I know that is bad too, is it not enough? 

These last year "normal" sound exposures (like the AC on a train, traffic noise, etc) had been getting me steadily worse. And this month I'm a lot worse, is more reactive, reach higher frequencies at more volume, and I think that happened because I was exposed to a noisier than average traffic level on a busy street. 

I was working on raising my exposure to sounds but this may have been too much. I've been avoiding a lot of sounds the past two years or so, I go out only when really needed such as basic errands (although I force myself not to wear earplugs, so at least once or twice a week I got exposed to street sounds and then end having a horrible tinnitus day), I bathe rather than shower if I can, you get the idea. And in this time my tinnitus has become more and more reactive, it gets higher and buzzier with more sounds each time. And now every time I try to tough up and get normal sound exposure, the tinnitus reaches new record levels. 

Is that the usual pattern on a hyperacusis setback? Any of you has had a similar pattern? Is it possible that I do something to get my tinnitus to the more steady, lower, less reactive level I had, or is this a permanent damage? 
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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #2 
IsaakBanin,

I have loudness H, and have the same problem. If I am at home and in relative quiet, my T most of the time is tolerable.  If I go out and try to expose to normal sounds, the T signals get louder.  Mine was caused from acoustic trauma.

I can't say for sure, but I do believe that loudness H contributes to this.  Humans are not meant to hear the environment abnormally loud, so it is logical that hearing this way would elevate the T.   Then again there seems to be nothing really logical regarding this phenomenon.  

Just my thoughts.....

Take care,
Kathy Mc
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Steve2017

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Reply with quote  #3 
I can relate to the 'dishes clanking' - yes I was there with all that a few years ago when my H was bad, asking wife to place the spoons in the draw nice and quietly and avoiding any types of fans or beeps etc etc... It sounds to me that you are under a tremendous amount of stress, try on working on lowering that and other problems can then ease slightly, its a start. If you click on my name, look through my posts; just might just be one thing in there that can help turn things around for you for the better, if not just keep looking for something that's suits you to help....

Steve. 

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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Kathy, I've read some of your past posts, I'm sorry you've been through that much. Indeed I've seen more people on this forum who seems to have loudness H contributing to reactivity of the tinnitus. In my case, it has grow to be more and more reactive these past 3 years or so, the more I stayed at home and avoided sounds, the more reactive it got. 

How it has been for you? When you got small improvements for your loudness tolerance in the past, have you noticed the T getting less reactive too? Like for example if you got 5 db more tolerance, the T would start reacting to sounds 5 db louder than before? 

Steve, thanks so much for the encouragement. Yes, I'm under a lot of stress right now, and working on lowering that. I've read your posts and sadly I don't think I could do well with your approach although is very brave to do it that way. In my case I've already tried to force myself to not use plugs for traffic street noise, coffee shops with clanking dishes (but without loud music) and everyday "normal" sound, and my tinnitus has kept getting more reactive and my sound tolerance lower. I guess a few minutes of louder sound don't do much good when the average exposure is otherwise low, and it may even be counterproductive for some of us to go suddenly from living in the quiet to noisy places. Maybe I'd need a progressive approach to avoid setbacks. 

Anyone has any experiences reversing the tinnitus reactivity when it has become reactive over the years? Did improving the loudness tolerance worked to reduce T reactivity for someone? 
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Steve2017

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Reply with quote  #5 
T.. I still have and deal with it every day - I have to remind myself when feeling low and 'tin' is having a go, just rest a while then focus 'open your mind' move around sharply get jobs done, don't stress, and yes after a while it backs off, this is just me how I get by day by day. Meditation helps as well, doesn't lower T but gives you strength to push on then it lowers. I have eased back on screen time as well, and brightness lower, this helps.
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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #6 
Isaac
I too had a reoccurance of hyperacusis shortly after a re- emergence of tinnitus. But, it was the reactive tinnitus in one ear.I noticed it as I spoke and with external sounds too.It blanketed every small sound..even wind passing through an open car window.I knew I had to treat this but how?
I had already used TRT with sound generators so...I pulled them out of my top drawer and put in fresh batteries. I thought..."Here we go again "... I used the gens as low as possible to try and get below the tinnitus threshold of sound. Being careful not to set volume too loud or ineffectively too low. In a matter of 8 weeks, the reactive tinnitus subsided. It seemed to be yet another weird stage of hyperacusis. Even when we feel healing or improvement, weird anomalies can crop up to discourage us. We panic. In my case...I found it strange that whenever I had a good hyperacusis day...it was a bad tinnitus day...and visa versa. When tinnitus was low....Hyperacusis worse. Just strive to do anything you can to mask the tinnitus in a way that's not overkill. Build slowly and go easy on sound exposure as you sleep. Sometimes setting nature sounds too loud as you sleep will spike tinnitus. Keep nature sounds...ex..ocean...rain..wind...white noise...pink....just BELOW the threshold of tinnitus. Do Not Compete with the ringing..hissing etc. To challenge tinnitus will spike it's reaction. Stay in the ring and fight this intelligently . It's tricky but..you have time to learn it's ways.Go slowly steadily but daily dose of controlled sounds that You can tailor to your needs.If at all possible..wear headsets with nature sounds while out in noisy places.Kerp focus on the steady sounds not the sudden clamor of the outside world unless it's a steady dynamic range such as rain...ocean etc. Hyperacusis affects our dynamic range. Sudden sounds alert our brains in a negative way. Our job is to reset our brains back to accepting sound as safe .But...do so in a maneagle controlled way...maneagle controlled way...repeat this 1000 times in your head. Good days ahead.
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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #7 
IssakBanin,

In answer to your question, it is difficult to say.  There seems most of the time to be rather unpredictable.  I do know I have several signals all the time that keep changing in volume, and sound.   I do know that if I try to go out into public with out hearing protection, it does spike for several hours to several days, depending on how long I have been out. I do know that certain frequencies make my ears ring, or can pick up on higher pitches.

I have tried music therapy as well for several years, and I can not get past a certain level.  When my T is worse it seems My LOUDNESS H is worse.  If I try to push were I was before the T worsens.

So it is a catch 22 deal.  The only way I can just about tolerate the T is to stay at home, or go out when I have to, but now I wear hearing protection.  It seems I am ACTUALLY hearing everything much louder than normal, and it is intolerable. 

The medical community can not help me and tells me as much. The only thing that I have been offered is TRT, from an out of town audiologist.  There is NO ONE in the Houston med center that offers this.  I went to one in that location that supposedly treated H.  Well it was very obvious to my husband and myself she was CLUELESS.  I finally got well enough to travel to her office with out over whelming symptoms,  and that was very disheartening. 

Hope that makes sense.  It is very difficult to make sense out of any of this.  All of my issues were induced by noise trauma, through no fault of my own.   If you read both my husbands posts and mine, you may get a better understanding. 

Take care and God bless
Kathy Mc
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Kathy, I hope it gets better for you, wether with TRT if you end being able to do it or other approaches. Knowing about your experience helps me a lot, it seems I may have pushed it too much. I think it may be better that I wear protection for noisy streets while I work to grow sound tolerance at home with rain sounds and such. 

Saab, your advice is very helpful and I've seen other old messages from people with similar experiences about reactivity disappearing with H improvement. I don't feel brave enough yet to try headsets (not even inside home) but I'll try to get more steady sound exposure like ocean and rain sounds at low level at home. I already use soft instrumental music but as I read here, maybe that's not the ideal treatment for hyperacusis and a broadband sound like nature or pink noise is needed. 

I also think I have somatic issues ongoing, TMJ and neck. Lots of days lately I'm waking up after about 4 or 5 hours with louder tonal high pitch and my jaw has been having more crepitus lately, so I suspect night bruxism as a factor. Other times that I have woke with louder T I found I had the neck stretched towards a side in my sleep. I'll take some magnesium and take care of the muscles too. Muscle spasms may worsen hyperacusis too? 
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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #9 
Isaak,

I was told I have some somatic T as well in addition to kindling with sound and reactive T!  It all becomes very confusing.  The medical community knows so very little of T as well as H.  They have been researching T for decades and really nothing of any real gain, and help.

I hope I am not coming off as being too negative.  I am merely telling of my PERSONAL experiences with my posts.   Everyone is different. 

If you are experience LOUDNESS H I personally do not believe muscle spasms worsen this.  Perhaps pain issues?

Wishing you the best possible recovery!

Kathy Mccain
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for the good wishes Kathy! 

I'm starting to use these past two nights a rain sound that doesn't seem to exacerbate my tinnitus, at least not at the low volume I'm using it at. 

I'm thinking of combining therapies and, when I can tolerate to raise a bit more the rain sound volume, notching it for the tinnitus, as the italian researchers of windowed sound therapy have said that notching nature sounds is equally or even more effective than notched white noise. That way I could treat hyperacusis thanks to the broadband rain sound, and at the same time tinnitus thanks to the notch made to the rain sound. Do you know if this has already been tried?
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Isaak,

You’ve received some great advice. I hope you find it helpful. What really speaks to me, in your posts, is the increasing level of distress hyperacusis and reactive tinnitus is causing you, yet you hold a clear desire and willingness to try and explore treatments that could potentially be of great benefit to you. You ask really important questions about the nature of your symptoms, showing a needed desire to gain knowledge. Knowledge is empowering and I believe an important part of the healing process.

I don’t know your situation, particularly whether you are under the care of an audiologist. If not, after 7 years or more of struggling with your condition, it seems you owe it to yourself to seek out an audiologist who has a lot of experience evaluating and treating patients with hyperacusis and tinnitus. I think you would likely benefit from this in a big way. You may not have one nearby and that’s ok.. it’s worth traveling for. You clearly seem to want to get better. I think this should be your next step, if you haven’t already taken it.

I completely share your concerns with reactive tinnitus, hyperacusis, avoidance and fear of sound. I am struggling right here with you with seemingly very similar issues. I spend a lot of time with my audiologist discussing my concerns, fears, challenges.. and it really helps keep me moving. There are so many times I feel like giving up with this. The auditory system is so finicky and erratic,, healing is a slow process. The damage is physiologic, yet we can rewire our brains through desensitization in “a manageable and controlled way” as saab stated earlier. It is my impression, that yes, the sound reactive component likely will reduce as your hyperacusis heals. You must treat the hyperacusis first. The reactive tinnitus will pitch a fit during this time.. and as your hyperacusis slowly heals, the reactivity likely will dissipate,

Hope that helps, we are in this together.

Best,
EDogg
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks EDogg, may I ask if you have also tinnitus reactivity and if it is improving with hyperacusis treatment? In that case, for how many years it's been being reactive before treatment? Did your audiologist explain you something about improving reactivity? (Not to question what you say, as I've also read about other's in this forum improving their reactivity by treating H, I'm just curious about what professionals say.)

I agree with you about doing therapy and I already have located an audiologist I want to work with, problem is I'm broke (like danger-of-eviction broke) and I have to sort out some things in the next months, it will take a while till I'm able to see the audiologist for the initial tests, probably even more to pay for any treatment. So I need to start doing what I can now on my own. I'm using a bluetooth speaker as sound machine with ocean sound all night and I'm trying to get advice and information about treating H. 

Interestingly, I remember that every time my T has increased these last months I was exposed to more sound AND worried about it. One day I was with friends in a quiet place for a while but their voices sounded too loud and I got worried, that night I woke up after 4 hours with worse tinnitus and slept poorly for many days after that. Then it was the noisy street exposure that I also forced myself to go through despite my worries, and my T and H are even worse after that. Is this a common setback pattern? 

I think I may have to do a more progressive approach, allowing myself to use protection in places that are not objectively too loud, but are loud to me with my current H level (I measured the loud microwave ding at 70 db and I'm uncomfortable with TV over 60 db too.) That could mean keep using plugs for train travel, for example, and also for noisy streets and such, while at the same time I keep sleeping with ocean sound, using more ocean sounds by day and music too, but raising the level very slowly. Is that a good protocol for now? 

One thing I'm curious too, is it normal for reactive tinnitus when it is due to loudness H to be reactive to "softer" complex sounds, like a frying pan? Or it should only be reactive to the total db level of sound? 
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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #13 
Isaakbanin

With regards to reactive T, mine can react to softer noises as well.  If I am frying on the stove I wear muffs too.  Actually it sounds very harsh and loud to me....awful !!

Hope that helps!

Kathy McCain
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks Kathy, it helps to know indeed. Saab, EDogg, anyone else, is that way for you too? 
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Margy

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi Isaak,

My tinnitus starts out soft most days and then increases with different sounds. For example, when I drive my car, my tinnitus gets louder and gets extra tones, too. My car isn’t loud, but it does have some road noise and other noises. If I hear a sound very close to my ear, even though it’s soft it can change the tinnitus briefly. I think tinnitus just keeps changing.
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hi Isaak,

Yes, I have sound reactive tinnitus and very severe hyperacusis. My reactive tinnitus has not significantly improved, but I only just started sound generator (TRT) treatment a week ago. I tried using ambient sounds for the prior 7 months and that didn’t seem to make much a dent. hopefully, it will work for you. There have been moments my hyperacusis is less pronounced, and during those times my reactive tinnitus seems to be fairly quiet. For me, they are closely tied at the hip. I’m not sure that it’s like that for everyone,

You are on the right track and are motivated, Hope you can manage to get evaluated and start treatment soon. The ambient sounds might help until you get into a formal plan. I know, for me, the cricket sounds help me sleep at night. The chirps are too rapid for my reactive tinnitus,, can’t keep up with em!

Your gradual approach to reducing ear plug/earmuff use is wise, IMO. You must be gentle and kind to yourself. This is a process and it takes patience, dedication and TIME, slow, steady purposeful reduction in ear protection sounds very reasonable,

As for your last question.. my reactive tinnitus reacts to just about every sound,. Worse with those at higher frequencies. Frying pan most definitely in that category,

Keep at it!

EDogg
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #17 
Oh, and I forgot to answer this in my previous post. Yes, my audiologist (who has over 20 years treating thousands of patients) told me that the reactive component of the tinnitus usually calms down after desensitization treatment for hyperacusis. Trick is.. at the start, the reactive tinnitus can spike a lot. This is a tough hurdle to face, but one where you need to keep your focus set on the end goal.

Best,
EDogg
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #18 
Thanks Margy, your sympthoms are quite similar to my own, I can start the day with quite silent T (unless I tense the neck or clench my jaw while sleeping), then at the first exposures over 50 or 60 db it goes up. I can be all day in my room with my laptop and soft music without it increasing, but when I go out and do things in the rest of the house it starts reacting. 

EDogg, thanks so much, knowing your audiologist said that helps me a lot. I hope reducing H helps me to get the T less reactive too. I could be quite happy with the soft level I have before it starts reacting, if I got to that or similar I would consider myself basically cured. 
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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #19 
Isaak....did you read my post?
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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saab1216
Isaac I too had a reoccurance of hyperacusis shortly after a re- emergence of tinnitus. But, it was the reactive tinnitus in one ear.I noticed it as I spoke and with external sounds too.It blanketed every small sound..even wind passing through an open car window.I knew I had to treat this but how? I had already used TRT with sound generators so...I pulled them out of my top drawer and put in fresh batteries. I thought..."Here we go again "... I used the gens as low as possible to try and get below the tinnitus threshold of sound. Being careful not to set volume too loud or ineffectively too low. In a matter of 8 weeks, the reactive tinnitus subsided. It seemed to be yet another weird stage of hyperacusis. Even when we feel healing or improvement, weird anomalies can crop up to discourage us. We panic. In my case...I found it strange that whenever I had a good hyperacusis day...it was a bad tinnitus day...and visa versa. When tinnitus was low....Hyperacusis worse. Just strive to do anything you can to mask the tinnitus in a way that's not overkill. Build slowly and go easy on sound exposure as you sleep. Sometimes setting nature sounds too loud as you sleep will spike tinnitus. Keep nature sounds...ex..ocean...rain..wind...white noise...pink....just BELOW the threshold of tinnitus. Do Not Compete with the ringing..hissing etc. To challenge tinnitus will spike it's reaction. Stay in the ring and fight this intelligently . It's tricky but..you have time to learn it's ways.Go slowly steadily but daily dose of controlled sounds that You can tailor to your needs.If at all possible..wear headsets with nature sounds while out in noisy places.Kerp focus on the steady sounds not the sudden clamor of the outside world unless it's a steady dynamic range such as rain...ocean etc. Hyperacusis affects our dynamic range. Sudden sounds alert our brains in a negative way. Our job is to reset our brains back to accepting sound as safe .But...do so in a maneagle controlled way...maneagle controlled way...repeat this 1000 times in your head. Good days ahead.


Hi Saab, you mean this one? Yes, I read it. So when you say you noticed it as you spoke, you mean it reacted to your own voice and small external sounds too, not only louder ones, is that right? Maybe that's the part I didn't understand much, sorry, my concentration these days is so bad. 

Also, after that 8 weeks with the generators, your tinnitus went to baseline and stayed at the level you could have any given day in a quiet place before it started reacting? 

Thanks for sharing your experience, it gives me a lot of hope. 
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cactus

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Reply with quote  #21 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EDogg
Oh, and I forgot to answer this in my previous post. Yes, my audiologist (who has over 20 years treating thousands of patients) told me that the reactive component of the tinnitus usually calms down after desensitization treatment for hyperacusis. Trick is.. at the start, the reactive tinnitus can spike a lot. This is a tough hurdle to face, but one where you need to keep your focus set on the end goal. Best, EDogg

I agree with this as well. Tinnitus and hyperacusis often occur together, and seem in many ways to be two sides of the same coin. One could also see it as a scale: on the one hand, there is tinnitus (a phantom auditory perception, i.e. you hear a sound while there is no sound), and on the other hand there is hyperacusis (there actually is sound, but you hear it louder, distorted, painful etc.). Somewhere between these two relatively clearly defined terms, you will find symptoms such as the 'reactive' tinnitus, where you hear phantom sounds but they are triggered by external sounds.

Myself I sometimes hear a form of 'beeping' which overlays the sounds that I hear (the length of the beeping sound and the intensity is directly dependent on the actual sound I hear).  Is this tinnitus? Is this hyperacusis? Or is this something in the middle? Both tinnitus as well as hyperacusis seem to occur because of some form of increased auditory gain, which on the one hand can make you hear noises that you normally would not hear (e.g. tinnitus) and on the other hand can make you hear the actual sounds louder / distorted. From this perspective it makes sense that when hyperacusis improves (i.e. when auditory gain is turned down), this will also have a beneficial effect on the tinnitus (especially the reactive kind, which seems closely related to the hyperacusis-like mechanism, in the sense that it is dependent on external sound). 

I also think these symptoms can indeed spike when you first start using pink noise / broadband noise. I'd like to think of it as a workout for your ears, afterwards my ears are a bit tired and sore but if I let them rest they will improve to be a bit stronger than they were before, just like when lifting weights. The trick is to push yourself a bit each time, but not so much that you injure yourself.

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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #22 
Cactus, if that beep you hear is like a tone deep in the ear, not in the head, and it vanishes slowly after the external sound has ended, it may be what Lynn in this forum calls the "EEEEEEE" sound. It is caused by the tensor tympani muscle. 

I also had that some years ago, after a middle ear infection that started all the worsening of my hyperacusis and led me to avoid more and more sounds. It was a mid frequency tone, like an "UUUUU" sound in response to continuous noises, and I also could provoke it by humming. It was louder with loud sounds, and more prolongued the more long the external sound was, and it always vanished slowly until it stopped in silent places. 

It went away for me after maybe two years or so, and my tensor tympani issues are less these days, I just have the eardrum rumbling with my phone speaker and some recorded voices. I hope it improves for you too, is quite possible it goes away in its own even if your H doesn't improve. What I've seen is that middle ear sympthoms doesn't always correlate with H severity, at least that's not my case. 
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cactus

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Reply with quote  #23 

Hi IsaakBanin,

Thanks for your reply. Do you really thing this is related to TTTS? Because I have that as well occasionally (for example when I am on the phone), but it manifests itself more as a thumping / throbbing sound in the ear itself, as the eardrum is actually tensed and released by the muscles. The 'overlaying' tinnitus seems to be a different phenomenon, and it vanishes almost immediately after the sound has ended. I believe this to be more related to the increase in auditory gain, as if the sounds 'clips' as with a speaker that has too much input signal. 

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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #24 
Although I'm not an expert, based on my own experience I think is related. When I started having that sound I also started having that thumping (more like a flapping) that could last for hours or days at a time.

Now that the sound went away I also don't have usually any more flapping, only the rumbling with the phone's speakers and a bit of rumbling if I run the fingers along that side of my face (because trigeminal nerve stimulates the tensor tympani muscle). If the sound was related to pure brain auditory gain, maybe my H or my T would have improved too (as it dissapearing would mean I would have improved the gain), but it's not the case, that sound disappeared but my H is worse and my T too. And the only other thing that improved apart of that sound were my tensor tympani problems. 

Another thing that could cause it is the stapedius muscle, I think. That muscle also tenses in people with H and can tense the ossicle chain, which could produce that sound as a vibration in response to prolongued intense sounds. That would explain the sound being simultaneous with the flapping or rumbling, as it would have a source independent from the tensor tympani. And based on what I've read online, is common to have the stapedial reflex threshold lowered when one also has tensor tympani myoclonus, both muscles have a role in the protective acoustic reflex. 
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cactus

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Reply with quote  #25 

Hi IsaakBanin,

Very interesting, I also have TTTS (thumping) when I touch my face and feel some pain in my trigeminal nerve when I do so. 

On the other hand, my stapedius reflex is working properly (it was tested during my latest audiology exam via acoustic reflex testing, as my LDL's had sufficiently improved for such a test to be performed.) This would mean only my tensor tympani is acting up, as well as the inner ear nerves / auditory nerves / central nervous system / brain or whatever it is that actually causes the H.

For the rest, as far as any doctor has been able to tell, my middle ear is functioning properly (no earwax, no abnormal stapedius reflex, no damage to the eardrum, nothing wrong with my eustachian tubes, no sinus issues, no conductive hearing loss, normal tympanogram) 

I only have the thumping occasionally, and often don't have it even though I hear the reactive beeping sound. The reactive beeping seems to me to be more H&T related than TTTS related, (similar to an amplifier clipping when it has too much gain) but we can't know for sure, especially since for you it was so clearly linked to TTTS.

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IsaakBanin

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Reply with quote  #26 
I guess it's still posible that it is more linked to H and T and it was coincidental with TTTS, as TTTS is also a manifestation of H in many cases. And maybe H can have more prevalent signs for some time and then change and bring along other sympthoms as the main issue. For me is quite erratic, sometimes I've had brief ear fullness with unexpected noises and many other times with a similar noise I don't have it, for example. The only thing that remains constant is the db level I can tolerate and the kind of sounds I can't tolerate. 

So I wouldn't reject any hypothesis at this moment, it still seem related to TTTS as it went for me, but maybe you're right, I also like your theory. 

These last two days I've started to do DIY white notched noise (notching a rain sound file, as white noise is too harsh for my ears) because my T was starting to be unbearable. I'm doing long sessions during the day and sleeping with it, all with the laptop speakers in a quiet room, without headphones. The tone that I intend to treat is already appearing less often, a bit softer and doesn't stay for the rest of the day as it used to, so it seems it's working. 

I'd like to ask to the more experts here (Rob maybe?) and others if this can double as therapy for hyperacusis too. The rain sound is notched from about 7,6khz to 9,7khz (my tinnitus is in the 8500 range more or less) and I also notched a bit in the 2khz range to avoid exacerbating a very quiet tone that I only hear plugging the ear or in a silent place (I treated that tone about two years ago with some notched rain too, just a few weeks because it had got louder, and it was enough and stayed soft, but listening to rain noise these days was raising it a bit again.)

So I'd need to be able to do sound enrichment with notched sounds, as otherwise my tinnitus tones could exacerbate. Is that an option as long as the rain sound has still energy in the lows, mids, and high ranges and I expose myself to more sound out of therapy times too? 
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This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.