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June

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Reply with quote  #1 
I read in someone's recent posting that for some hyperacusics a muscle known as the tensor tympani can contract, just in anticipation of a sound.  I think this may be happening to me.    Does anyone here have this experience? 
How can this tensor tympani muscle be relaxed in order to avoid this? 



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debIam

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi June,   I'm experimenting with cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril).  It's a muscle relaxer.. It is helping me sleep regardless.  Maybe Dr. J could chime in on this one.

I'm also using "behind the counter" sudafed to even out the barometric pressure changes.  Pressure changes seem to make my ear "tick" more and become uncomfortable.  The pressure increases both T & H for me.

This is just what I'm doing because it seems to be helping me. 

deb
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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi June,

We have discussed anti-convulsant medications and natural versions on the board, if you have or can see a neurologist or (especially) oto-neurologist it might be worth discussing this topic.
I have felt that an anti-convulsant raised the threshold to the cycle of tt tightening, causing post-exposure ear discomforts to be a bit less.
I have taken both prescription Gabapentin - Neurontin and all natural GABA supplement.
Others have taken Lyrica.
Again I would discuss these ideas with especially an oto-neurologist and/or other knowledgeable health practitioner.
High caffiene use or caffiene use that one is sensitive to might be reduced or curtailed for a window of time to see if this is contributing too.

I hope that you will let us know how things go for you.

Best wishes,

Debbie


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June

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Reply with quote  #4 

Thanks very much, Debbie and Deb.


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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi June,

On seeing your post, I was reminded of something I posted recently, and thought you may find it helpful.

Wishing you better days, and much improvement.

Someone was wondering about tensor tympani syndrome, (or similar symptoms) not long back  - and I posted the following -

Quote:


The following website has some helpful and useful information

http://www.tinnitus.org/home/frame/THC1.htm
 The Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Centre, London UK

Their download page has many articles and more information available as well.
including some articles in their download section ...
about tensor tympani syndrome.

Awhile back, in a post to some people on this board, 
Rob mentioned -

Quote:
you may appreciate the seminal paper on tensor tymapni syndrome written by Klochoff - who coined the term.


http://www.tinnitus.org/home/frame/Tensor%20tympani%20syndrome_Klochoff.pdf 


 There is also another article called "Things That Go Bump In The Night"- that you may find interesting ...
if you are curious about tensor tympani syndrome.

Also, in doing a search for this
I found that Rob has mentioned in several different posts -  that a reduction in caffeine intake may be helpful for those with Tensor Tympani syndrome, and that it   can also be related to stress.

Here is one of those posts -
Rob mentioned -

Quote:
John,

How much caffeine do you have each day?  Do you drink coffee, Coke, etc?  If one of the symptoms you are describing is related to your tensor tympani muscle, it could help to alleviate those symptoms to some degree by cutting back on caffeine. 

The increased muscle activity of the tensor tympani can have a great deal to do with tension and stress.  In our case, the stress may be exacerbated by one's reaction to hyperacusis or tinnitus.  Addressing the stress often reduces the hyperactivity of the tensor tympani muscle.  At one of the premiere facilities in Europe for treating hyperacusis and tinnitus, The Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Centre, more than 40% of patients have symptoms related to the tensor tympani muscle. 

Irregular clicking sounds in the ear can be related to palatal myoclonus.   

Rob



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Rob

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Reply with quote  #6 
June writes -- 
 
I read in someone's recent posting that for some hyperacusics a muscle known as the tensor tympani can contract, just in anticipation of a sound.  I think this may be happening to me.  Does anyone here have this experience?  How can this tensor tympani muscle be relaxed in order to avoid this? 
 
June, the first question to answer is what makes you think it may be happening to you?  If it is happening in your case, the single best way to enable this muscle to relax is to find a clinician who is knowedgeable and experienced in treating hyperacusis and to involve yourself in a program to re-establish your tolerance of sound.  Hyperacusis and an overly active tensor tympani muscle are probably connected.  This muscle or another ear muscle can begin to do their jobs a little too well when we feel we are in danger around sound.  (It isn't that the muscle can contract in anticipation of sound per se; it's that it can contract when we anticipate that the sound will harm us.)  By reintroducing sound and working with it in a consistent manner that is well-suited to one's particular needs, we can also retrain those muscles to not be overprotective.
 
Rob 
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June

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you very much Quieter Breeeze and Rob for your  helpful information.  i will spend some time tonight reviewing it and discuss it with my doctor.  I also think that I am unfortunately developing phonophobia and that it may be associated with my responses.   Oh well, one day at a time...

It means so much to me to be able to connect with the knowledgeable, kind people on this website who really understand - - and it is helping me to find my way through this most difficult time.    Thank you ! !

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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi all,

I posted something about this a couple of months ago. Was just wondering if anyone was having any successes? I had a good week where my ear didn't respond overly to sound and my tinnitus was manageable.  Unfortunately this only lasted a week then my problems came back worse with the additions of ear pain and them feeling blocked.  My GP says I do not have an infection but the pressure in my ear is causing the ear drum to retract.  I can not physically pop my ears and so was thinking of buying an otovent device although unsure this could do more harm than good. Also seen an expensive piece of equipment called 'ear popper' but as I say it is very pricey and I wouldn't want to damage my ear drum..

Asked GP about the muscle relaxant 'Norflex' but she wouldn't prescribe it. Are there any other more 'acceptable' relaxants out there that anyone could advise? I am on sertraline for anxiety and so am unsure what I can actually take on top of this.

I'm thinking of going to see a oesteopath as have read that this can help with eustachian tube problems...

Any advice would be greatly appreciated I really am at the end of my tether!

Wishing you all well

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cbBen

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Reply with quote  #9 
Klonopin has worked for me, as has Upledger craniosacral therapy, but it's not necessarily the tensor tympani that is misbehaving.  It may be a different muscle.  Do you hear a rumble upon muscle contraction?  Or a moth-like flutter?  If not I would bet it's not the tensor tympani. 

But maybe it doesn't matter what the muscle is. 

Klonopin and Upledger craniosacral are two things that have helped me.

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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Ben,
Yes its more like a rumble/thump in response to sounds that I hear, as though I can hear the muscle physically moving. What is Upledger caraniosacral therapy? I was thinking of seeing a cranial therapist but didnt know there were different types

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cbBen

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Reply with quote  #11 
Well the rumble may mean it is the tensor tympani after all.  Have you seen an otologist regarding the condition?  He or she would be in he best (and really only) position to diagnose you and prescribe a course of care.

I don't know how many different types of craniosacral therapy there are, but I do know of two kinds:  biodynaic and Upledger.   Upledger.com is where I found my therapist, who did help me a great deal.  But keep in mind that my symptom is aural fullness, not rumbling or other noises upon muscle contraction; so we may not be in the same position.

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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you for your information. I have looked on that website but it says that finding a practitioner is down at the moment so will have to check back. I've made an appointment to see a local oesteopath tomorrow so will post back how I get on. 

I have seen an ENT who mentioned hyperacusis but did not go into it any further and I am finding this part of my symptoms more troublesome than the tinnitus. At 23 the thought of having this for the rest of my life really fills me with dread. I wish there was more help out there... perhaps I will have to go to the hyperacusis centre in London to finally get some help.


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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #13 
I have seen the oesteopath today. He found me to have a lot of tension and tight muscles around my left (worse) ear and that side of my neck.  I'm not really sure if it has helped, I so far do not have any pain around that ear which I have been getting for the past week.  He did state that he didn't think his therapy would help with my noise sensitivity but he thinks it could help with my pother ear problems.

I finally have my follow up ENT appointment in 2 weeks so that I can see an audiologist. Do audiologists on the NHS know anything about hyperacusis though...? this remains to be seen I think..

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