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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi All,

Because things have got so bad for me my dh and I have been throwing around thoughts and ideas on where we could live and what we could do to help make our own little world (home) a better place to live in.  We currently rent so can't put these ideas into practice yet and maybe never, as finances are also limited.  However I was just wondering if anyone else has tried or researched or actually carried out different ideas on soundproofing your existing home or a new home. 
Some of the ideas we have come up with and researched are :
Round houses (sound bounces off these - doesn't absorb) with slanted rooves/walls.
Soundproofing internally and externally - can use on existing walls as well as new houses...
Soundproof Paint - originally developed as a heat insulator but is soundproofing as well.
Double Glazing of doors and windows.
Lots of Soft Furnishings

Like I say I don't know whether we will ever be able to live this dream but Oh wouldn't it be nice...!!  A soundproof house!!  With only your favourite sounds or music playing and noises totally controlled!!

Lou



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Billymoe

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Lou
I made a attempt to sound proof my living room with the help of a co-worker who has his own recording studio. My living room is about 30 feet long. My wall unit with all the electronic equipment is about 8 feet. He used pyramid studio foam behind the wall unit, which extended to 16 feet. We also did the rear wall and ceiling.
  You mention controlling the noise That's the part that helped me the most along with the studio foam. Let's take the lastest Star Trek movie as an example. When Spock is talking to someone you could barely him speak, then when the Star Ship passes by it sounds extremely loud. I have a piece of electronic gear which will increase the input signal up to 24db and also limit the output to any desired level. My co-workers are always telling me they have to adjust the remote control every time the watch movie, and they don't have Hyperacusis.
    I've had this set up for about 7 years, and it has worked very well, provided I don't try to push it to 80db
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #3 

Quote:
Like I say I don't know whether we will ever be able to live this dream but Oh wouldn't it be nice...!! A soundproof house!! With only your favourite sounds or music playing and noises totally controlled!!

Lou, how loud are the sounds in your home that are bothering you? You may want to get a SPL meter and find out. I know apartments can be noisy, but when I tried to seal of my room from outside sounds, my condition got worse, and other sounds just started sounding louder to me. Ears need practice with lots of sounds. 

It's important to try to act normal about sounds as possible and not anticipate bad things happening. 

If your plan is gradual desensitization then trying to completely isolate yourself from these sounds that bother you could just make things worse, especially if your dealing with phonophobia. Given that you can handle an air conditioning system (you mentioned that in another thread) you may just be dealing with misophonia/phonophobia.

Just my thoughts ... I don't know what you're up against sound wise in your home.

Best of luck,

John



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Billymoe

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Reply with quote  #4 
Actually you could her more of whats on the recording in a well treated sound envirornment.Noise travels in waves. When a sound wave encounters a solid object, it can bounce back  and form an echo. This is a good way to build your tolerance up, because you could listen to music at higher levels in a proper sound environment.
        I guess it depends what your priorities are. Mine is MUSIC. For me there is no dislike or hatred of sound when it comes to music.Unfortunately, reverberation often markedly exacerbates an already noisy environment
  
Bill M.
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi John,

In other threads Lou has mentioned what sounds like construction going on across the street from her house.....

In another thread i suggested that it can be helpful to leave at times - as sometimes it may be  quieter elsewhere, when things get too loud from situations such as that - or other loud noise from outdoors
And Lou  mentioned that due to other factors, she is not able to drive.

So to me it sounds like being home, unable to leave - with ongoing construction across the street when ones ears are very sensitive would leave one wondering how to best cope with the situation.

I think that may be part of where Lou is coming from......


Bill,

Would the type of foam you mention be able to be used to cover the windows during the day, while the construction is going on -  and be able to be removed at night?
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Actually you could her more of whats on the recording in a well treated sound envirornment.Noise travels in waves. When a sound wave encounters a solid object, it can bounce back and form an echo. This is a good way to build your tolerance up, because you could listen to music at higher levels in a proper sound environment.
I guess it depends what your priorities are. Mine is MUSIC. For me there is no dislike or hatred of sound when it comes to music.Unfortunately, reverberation often markedly exacerbates an already noisy environment

Bill M.


Hi Bill,

We have a music room in the basement that is quiet, where we listen to music. As you know there are many ideas for treating a room for good music. Our room is already pretty dead, and we use sound diffusers to break up sound waves, and have tube traps in the corners to help with low frequency standing waves.

I understand you not wanting to hear noise when you listen to music. But that's different than completely isolating yourself from the outside world because you're afraid these sounds will hurt you.

TRT is avoidance in reverse and you can't make progress with sounds if you completely avoid them. Avoidance prevents habituation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze
In other threads Lou has mentioned what sounds like construction going on across the street from her house.....

Hi Breeze,

Construction can be loud, but acoustic foam won't do much at all to attenuate low frequency sounds that are usually found at construction sites. Isolating your ears from the high frequency sounds coming into the home could make things worse. 

Speaking from my personal experience, if Lou blocks all the windows with foam to avoid all these sounds for an extended periods (like days), she's going to have a very hard time removing the foam from the windows once the construction is over. Her ears likely won't tolerate it. That's been my experience. 

If it's just for short periods won't be a problem, and might help some, but I also like your idea of just moving to a quieter room when construction sounds get to much for her. That's what I did when it was a problem for me. But, I can handle these sounds fine now in my home because I kept trying.

John


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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #7 
Lou mentioned -

  A soundproof house!!  With only your favourite sounds or music playing and noises totally controlled!!


The problem with a totally controlled environment would become apparent and noticeable the minute one stepped out of it....
With these challenges being able to improve tolerances and also have "everyday" sounds that have become not only too loud but stressful  /too stressful become less stressful and also less noticeable (to the point that what used to be in the background is again in the background) is very helpful and in my view important.

Though when ones hearing/ears are really sensitive and it seems like the world presents never ending noise that is too difficult to tolerate - the thoughts like you mention, Lou - could easily come to mind...

To work on improving tolerances to sound in appropriate ways -- can be very helpful,
at the same time when one has really sensitive hearing/ears, avoiding  sound that is too difficult ---as one works in appropriate ways to be able to tolerate more in the way of sound ----in my view can be helpful.

Hi Lou,
Some situations present more of a challenge than others, to have noisy / loud construction going on nearby is challenging.....
And especially In a situation like that, where you (because of other circumstances) are  not able to leave -
and get a break from the sound when necessary ....
it seems like it would be a good idea to try to make your environment as comfortable as possible ....

To dampen the sound in some way so it becomes more tolerable .....though only when necessary ......

Heavy curtains may be able to help some --

Have you thought about seeing if you could use some sort of shutters?
Another idea may be some window shades made of some sort of insulating fabric, or heavy fabric  .....to be able to lower and then close curtains over them --

And though not sound proof - a  relatively quiet  verses a noisy area   in which to live would have advantages. But even quiet areas can get noisy ....
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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks all for your replies,
I can't do anything about the noise going on around me, in the house we live in now, as it is rented. To get away from the construction noise I spend most of my time in the living room as I am able to close all doors to the side of the hose the noise is coming from...this is the best I can do apart from wearing protection which I only do if I have to go into one of the other rooms  or just can't put up with it anymore - usually by the end of the day...you all know that I fatigue very quickly due to my whole stimulation issue with noise only being part of the picture...
Because my problem as a whole is due to a benign tumour I could be like this for the rest of my life - unless proven it is due to a different cause.  This is why we are putting out feelers as to what others may have done to help minimise noise in their homes...I know it is impossible (and wouldn't do it anyway due to what has been mentioned about the effects of total noise isolation) to 'soundproof' a home in the true sense of the word - we would just be looking at lessening outside noise...I am very limited in being able to mix in normal society anyway due to the other aspects - I was even before the noise issue started. 

I think I am able to tolerate air conditioning (and mind you only at lowest volume) because I don't have a problem with soft sounds.  The construction noises are high pitched beeping, trucks clanging and banging - sudden and loud. 
Yes even quiet environments can be noisy - our home is quiet compared to most and we are all extra careful about making sudden loud or sharp noises but even then 'accidents' happen and these are more than enough for me to deal with, let alone constant noisy noise.  I need a calm and soothing environment with minimal stimulation of any sort....and this has nothing to do with phonophobia or photophobia or agrophobia or any type of phobia...it is simply because my brain and body cannot deal with normal stimulation.  I go into total meltdown and in order to have some quality of life I need an environment in which I can live stress free as this is where I spend the majority of my time - not out in a noisy over stimulating world. 

Today I wanted to go and get a sympathy card and so went out down to the local shopping centre and as soon as I went into the shop (with ear plugs in - I have no choice but to wear them - (if I didn't I wouldn't even be able to walk) You are assaulted by noise, light, movement, people - every sensory organ is stretched to it's limit and on top of that you have to think and move...I get in and out as quick as I can - I went to 2 different shops and we were back home in well under an hour.  I am exhausted and am extra (you wonder if you can get any more so) sensitive for the rest of the day - then on top of that (later in the day) I bang a baking dish lid on the range hood sending me into total melt down (I grab the rescue remedy and valor and head for my room).  Is it any wonder it is so hard to get back up after a setback...how can you ever start to climb back up when you keep getting pelted with stones??  You just seem to be in a state of protection and immediate survival with no moving forward...

Lou



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catlady2323

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimberleydust

 I need a calm and soothing environment with minimal stimulation of any sort....and this has nothing to do with phonophobia or photophobia or agrophobia or any type of phobia...it is simply because my brain and body cannot deal with normal stimulation.  I go into total meltdown and in order to have some quality of life I need an environment in which I can live stress free as this is where I spend the majority of my time - not out in a noisy over stimulating world. 

Today I wanted to go and get a sympathy card and so went out down to the local shopping centre and as soon as I went into the shop (with ear plugs in - I have no choice but to wear them - (if I didn't I wouldn't even be able to walk) You are assaulted by noise, light, movement, people - every sensory organ is stretched to it's limit and on top of that you have to think and move...I get in and out as quick as I can - I went to 2 different shops and we were back home in well under an hour.  I am exhausted and am extra (you wonder if you can get any more so) sensitive for the rest of the day -...
Lou


Well Lou you have eloquently described how I have experienced my life for as long as I can remember, and I don't have a brain tumor, nor do I have any type or kind of phobia. 

I have the good fortune to live in a quiet neighborhood in a quiet house, where only my favorite music or sounds are playing, and noises are almost completely controlled by me.   You are right, it has improved my quality of life, and provided me hours of happy contentment.

When I do have occasion to venture out into the noisy world, I have not found my noise tolerances any different at all from when I had daily constant exposure to such noise.  My tolerances are exactly the same, and in fact I handle them better now, because for the most part I feel relaxed and calm before having to venture outside. 

I am sorry you have a brain tumor, and such global sensitivities.  I have similar sensitivities and understand how debilitating they can be when trying to complete an education, hold down a job, and raise children (all three things which I have done). 

Well I hope you can find some soundproofing material to buffer down all that construction noise.  I just wanted to mention that although I don't have a brain tumor, my sensitivities are very similar to what you experience.

Best regards,

Sharon
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cbBen

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Reply with quote  #10 
The most important thing you can do is get rid of all dishes and silverware except for maybe a steak knife or two. Even plastic glasses should not be used. Use only plastic cups such as those you would receive a cold drink in at a coffee shop. Use only Vanity Fair brand (plastic-coated paper) plates and bowls. And use only high-quality plasticware.

It's a simple rule: If you can touch the two items together and they make a noise, forget it. I cannot tell you how much of a positive difference this will make in your life.

But you have to go all the way. No mix of hard and soft stuff.

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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #11 
Ben I have thought of doing that but you can't cook on the stove or in the oven with plastic ware! Or is there such a thing as silent bakeware and saucepans - I don't like cooking in the microwave. 
My solution around the kitchen is to just wear ear muffs to help buffer those noises...they don't totally block them out just buffer them - so I figured I am still hearing those noises and those particular frequencies but just at a quieter level...I figured that would be more beneficial than not allowing my ears to hear those sounds at all...(??) The other reason I do this is that as the day goes on and I get more fatigued I get clumsy and knock things together a lot - someone else usually washes up at night and I leave the room.
No one else is allowed in my kitchen other than my husband and son and friends who understand and who use it carefully and quietly...I have rubber matting and tea towels around the cupboards to help minimise bench noise. 

We have my dh parents visiting with us at the moment - they have their own van so sleep out there and to help me with my situation they cook for themselves (to minimise noise and activity around me) in their then come in and eat with us...the first night I couldn't cope with the extra noise of cutlery on plates or stirring of sugar in the coffees.  So now we use paper plates to eat off and plastic spoons to stir with and all are happy..

Lou
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cbBen

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Reply with quote  #12 
Yes you do need hard pots, pans, and a serrated steak knife; but you can get good quality reusable plasticware and plates/cups that don't clink (for the latter I believe Vanity Fair is a good brand). It will make a world of difference.
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Ben,

You mentioned--

The most important thing you can do is get rid of all dishes and silverware except for maybe a steak knife or two. Even plastic glasses should not be used. Use only plastic cups such as those you would receive a cold drink in at a coffee shop. Use only Vanity Fair brand (plastic-coated paper) plates and bowls. And use only high-quality plasticware.

Are you talking about Lou's situation? Or are you suggesting this would be appropriate for everyone?

In my view - for Lou's situation - something appropriate to help cover the windows to provide insulation from the sound of  Loud and ongoing construction going on outdoors - would be far more effective in my opinion.

Placing a towel on the counter under a plate, if necessary - may help dampen the sound.. And i could see times when "paper" plates would be helpful for some - but all plastic silverware and glasses?

Ben you mention -

Quote:
Use only Vanity Fair brand



Have you become a spokesperson for Vanity Fair? (just kidding;-)

you mention -

Use only plastic cups such as those you would receive a cold drink in at a coffee shop.

What do you use for hot coffee?

you mention -

 Yes you do need hard pots, pans, and a serrated steak knife;
 
 Serrated knives seem much easier on my ears than the other kind - for slicing veggies etc.
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kimberleydust

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Posts: 91
Reply with quote  #14 
aQb - very interesting observation re the serrated knives - we use serrated knives but didn't realise they were more sound friendly - we seem to have just learnt to use cutlery with care on crockery plates - works fine for just the 3 of us but when we have extra people eating with us I use paper plates - much easier all round and takes away the anticipatory anxiety on my side and the 'oops sorry' on the other person's side! For me 'oops sorry' is too late!
Yes - I use t towels too under plates - rubber matting around kitchen benches minimises a lot of the detrimental noise. 

I am coping with the construction sounds now by staying in the areas of the house where the sounds are the quietest and when I need to go into the other areas I wear my ear muffs. Probably the hardest time is first thing in the morning when just waking up - the beeping is the worst and the trucks seem to be busier - I just get out of my room as soon as I can.
During the day at times when I am feeling ok and can cope with it I sit in my lounge room for short periods of time to do a little 'desensitiseing' of the construction sounds...other times of the day - mostly as the day wears on and as I get more fatigued I can't do that.  However it doesn't matter what part of the house I am in I can still hear the construction sounds but they are easier in certain parts and I figure that still being able to hear them should also help with desensitiseing rather than not hearing them at all??  Sometimes though I do have to totally shut them out...It's a real juggling act but hopefully as time goes on things will improve - at least back to what my 'normal' was.

Lou




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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #15 
Lou,

In another thread you mentioned- (in reference to some other posts)

Since posting these I have been at my lowest point due to over exposure and not being able to escape from ongoing outside noise - waking up to it every day and affecting me on every level...until we 'plugged' up our bedroom window to block out the outside noise and create a 'safe' haven for me to start my day off on the right foot and also a place to rest from outside noise and light and all stimulation when needed.  This has proven extremely beneficial and I have been able to get back a little bit of strength which has enabled me to gain some tolerance and it is improving a little bit each day

I want to point out to others reading this - you have on going noisy construction going on across the street from your house - by the sound of what you have said in other posts.
Also due to your other challenges, which you have said make it so you are unable to drive  you are not able to leave - to get a needed break from the sound at times it may otherwise be very helpful to do so.

In my view this is not an average case of sound being too difficult for awhile.
Many people would be able to leave if necessary - and you have tried coping in other ways as well ......I think it's good that you realize that to allow in sound one Is able to tolerate, is a good thing.
I also understand there are differences between what is tolerable and what is not.

May I ask what you found to be able to block out the Loud noise? And how effective is it?

To be able to temporarily block out, or dampen  the sound of Very Loud construction when necessary, especially if one would not be able to leave if necessary - is something i think could be helpful for some with these challenges.

That is much different though - than trying to live in a sound proof environment.
which i would not recommend.

I like what Sandy has to say about some of  that in another thread --

Sandy mentioned -

For those folks who are considering making their kitchens more noise friendly, it is my recommendation you not do that.  If one cannot tolerate the standard sounds found in a kitchen, it will be very difficult to live in a world jam-packed with noise.  I would suggest moving toward the sound not away from it.  Sound is not the enemy; loud noise and silence is the enemy.  Ours ears crave sound. 

Sandy has many interesting things to say, she is one of the kind people I gained hope and inspiration from - before I even signed up for this board  -
The thread  that quote  is from - which is recent -
can be found here -
http://www.chat-hyperacusis.net/post?id=4798351

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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hi aQb,
Yes you correct we have ongoing construction noise and I am unable to get out and away from it - even if I could get away from it, with my level of sound tolerance at the moment, there is nowhere I can go that would be quiet enough for long enough, so out of dire necessity we have had to create this quiet space for me...It isn't 'soundproof' but is 'sound friendly'.  There is still outside noise entering in but probably blocks out about 60-70% depending on the frequency and type of noise...Noise still enters through the bedroom door from the rest of the house.  We used a sheet of MDF board - made it to fit the outside of the window, painted it and then sealed it - it is easily removed. 

My health has been really suffering because of the ongoing conditions and not having any reprieve.
For the benefit of newcomers - my situation is different to many here with 'straight forward' or if you like 'normal' hyperacusis.  I have a brainstem tumour which creates many issues of its own and the hyperacusis (whether it be related to it or not doesn't matter) has been making my life impossible to cope with.  The only way forward for me in this case is to minimise the worst of the stresses, which is noise. 
There is no way at all that I could do what Sandy did!!  I'm happy that it worked for her and if it works for others great!  I know of others where hyperacusis is a symptom of another condition and they wouldn't be able to expose themselves either to that level of sudden noise without serious consequences...

Since blocking the bedroom window I feel I am improving a little everyday and have even started working in the kitchen without ear muffs on...I am careful but accidents do happen and I am able to cope with those now whereas only a week ago I wasn't game to work in the kitchen without protection because I just couldn't afford to have a 'noise accident' - 2 weeks ago I couldn't handle any noise at all in the kitchen. 
Yesterday I went out and had coffee with 3 other family members at an outdoor cafe.  I had earplugs in not knowing what I would be faced with when arriving and as soon as we stepped out of the car I was glad I did because there was a screaming child right there and a metal grinder going not far away!  It was still loud enough that we almost left but then I felt like I would be ok so we stayed but I just left my plugs in...this to me was getting the 'best' of both worlds...I wasn't isolating myself from the sounds - could hear them well enough but yet wasn't exposing myself over my tolerance levels.  Remembering that even without the H, I struggle with my eyes/vision/light and balance.  The whole experience, by the time we had got back home, was very fatigueing but I was glad I did it. 

So I guess what I would like others to see here is that in my experience - noise protection is very important, for me, at certain times and levels...allowing noise to be part of my life is also very important as I recognise that silence is not good (however there is never silence - even with heavy duty muffs on - which I have to use still if I go outside - and you can still hear plenty of noise) - it's all about finding the right balance for your own situation and condition but stretching your limits a little bit each day - within your comfort levels - so that you are moving forward.  Before we blocked up the window I was going backwards very fast - as soon as we did that my forward progress has been very encouraging and I am gaining ground everyday.  Something else I have found very important and helpful for me is that after exposure (like yesterday) I have to have the rest of the day relatively quiet - my tolerance levels go down because of fatigue and so it is important to build that back up with rest - if I continue to push myself and expose myself to that same level of noise that is when a setback occurs. 

I am learning that we are all unique but one thing I think is helpful to everyone is that whatever you do to help yourself make sure it is moving you forward - if it isn't change it, try something else - try what others suggest - no one right thing is right for everyone.  Most important of all believe in what you are doing and feel comfortable with it...

Lou


Lou
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #17 

Quote:
Yesterday I went out and had coffee with 3 other family members at an outdoor cafe. I had earplugs in not knowing what I would be faced with when arriving and as soon as we stepped out of the car I was glad I did because there was a screaming child right there and a metal grinder going not far away! It was still loud enough that we almost left but then I felt like I would be ok so we stayed but I just left my plugs in...this to me was getting the 'best' of both worlds...I wasn't isolating myself from the sounds - could hear them well enough but yet wasn't exposing myself over my tolerance levels. Remembering that even without the H, I struggle with my eyes/vision/light and balance. The whole experience, by the time we had got back home, was very fatigueing but I was glad I did it. 

I'm really glad to hear you're still getting out and doing things, even if it's with ear protection, which you clearly need.

It's very helpful to have a place where you can feel comfortable and let your ears/nerves calm down, just as long as you're not isolating yourself from sounds all the time, which you aren't.

Quote:
I am learning that we are all unique but one thing I think is helpful to everyone is that whatever you do to help yourself make sure it is moving you forward - if it isn't change it, try something else - try what others suggest - no one right thing is right for everyone.  

I agree.

John

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi Lou,

You mentioned -
There is no way at all that I could do what Sandy did!!  I'm happy that it worked for her and if it works for others great!  I know of others where hyperacusis is a symptom of another condition and they wouldn't be able to expose themselves either to that level of sudden noise without serious consequences...

I was not suggesting you or others try what Sandy did.....
And I hope i did not give you that impression. I placed that quote of hers in this thread, because of what Ben mentioned about using Only plastic silverware - paper plates etc....
And I thought it would be good for others, who may be reading this to get a different perspective  on doing that.

I do find Sandy's story inspirational .....
and  if you look further,( than the first post in that other thread )  -
I think you will  find that alot of what Sandy did to regain her tolerances was gradual.....
(Though in her first post in that thread it may not seem that way  -
And much of what she mentions in her first post in the other thread -
I would not have been able to do either, and I understand what you are saying)
We are all different in what we Are able to tolerate - and in different places along the path we travel - and some have other challenges as well.
But I think the idea may be to gradually (if necessary) and persistently - work up to, and understand -  what we Are able to tolerate, . .... and keep moving forward as we are able to do so -
To make that choice, to go "forward" into sound, -  as we are able to tolerate it -
and allow sound in that we Are  able to tolerate - instead of keeping it out.


I have found that everything i Am  able to tolerate in the way of sound - seems to be helpful,
in helping me to be able to tolerate more in the way of sound - as time goes by - AND  as (and because ) I keep working on improving my tolerances in ways i Have found to be helpful.
As I move froward, improvements i notice are gradual - but noticeable. (especially when i look back at what i could, and could not,  tolerate previously)

You mentioned-

 Something else I have found very important and helpful for me is that after exposure (like yesterday) I have to have the rest of the day relatively quiet - my tolerance levels go down because of fatigue and so it is important to build that back up with rest - if I continue to push myself and expose myself to that same level of noise that is when a setback occurs. 
 
 
To take it easy soundwise - after after being around  sound that is too difficult for me to tolerate and  makes my hearing/ears more sensitive -
 is something i have found helpful, -   as being around sound that is too difficult for me to tolerate - when my hearing/ears are already more sensitive than they usually  are -  makes  my  hearing/ears even more sensitive to sound -
but in my own case it is not because of fatigue. It does not matter how tired i am ....
 it's how sensitive my hearing/ears are at the time.
 
 I'm glad you are getting some  much needed relief and respite - from the ongoing sound of the noisy construction going on across the street- from where you live - in my view it can be important not only from the perspective of not being around the loudness - but also also in helping to relieve some of the stress which that type of sound exposure would cause - day after day.
 
 By the way
 
 When it comes to kitchens and making them sound friendly - my choice is to forgo noisy appliances that are optional -
 (such as a Loud vegetable juicer,  loud mixer and coffee grinder) that are still too difficult For ME to tolerate and do those things in another manner if and when possible. (Such as mixing things by hand, and buying juice and pre-ground coffee at the store ) - Though one of these days i hope to be able to tolerate the sound level of those appliances again. My view is i will do whatever i can to avoid using hearing protection - and allow sounds in when possible.
 
 When i mentioned -

 Placing a towel on the counter under a plate, if necessary - may help dampen the sound..
 
 What i was referring to was for chopping vegetables. or food preparation - IF necessary.

Personally, as I mentioned previously -i find a serrated edged knife is easier on my hearing/ears,   than a straight bladed knife (when it comes to food preparation, such as slicing fruits and vegetables )  - and I find being careful / selective  in the way i use it to  slice veggies  can help alot too.
 
  I still can not be in my kitchen for long while the dishwasher is running - , but being able to be in a nearby  adjacent room while it is running - is a vast improvement.  Though if my hearing is more sensitive than it usually is - i may go to a room further from the sound - it depends on how sensitive my hearing/ears are at the time.
 
 I think it can  help to understand how sound affects us on an individual basis as well - and understand that - it can change, as we are able to tolerate more in the way of sound...Or sometimes when our hearing/ears are  more sensitive....
When my hearing/ears are more sensitive - I take it easier around sound.

Though at times, even during  setbacks - i' have  been able to make forward progress.....even while taking it as easy as necessary around sound at the time.
 
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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi aQB,
I had started a reply to you then lost it! Grrrr! So see how we go with another one!  Thanks for replying to mine.

Quote:

You mentioned -
There is no way at all that I could do what Sandy did!! 
I was not suggesting you or others try what Sandy did.....
And I hope i did not give you that impression.


No I didn't think that at all - I just made that comment as a factual observation - nothing attached to it. Thanks for relating though that when Sandy did this it was at a time in her own healing journey that she was able to tolerate it.  I haven't read any of Sandy's posts so will do so.

Quote:
We are all different in what we Are able to tolerate - and in different places along the path we travel - and some have other challenges as well.
But I think the idea may be to gradually (if necessary) and persistently - work up to, and understand -  what we Are able to tolerate, . .... and keep moving forward as we are able to do so -


I totally agree...

Quote:
As I move froward, improvements i notice are gradual - but noticeable. (especially when i look back at what i could tolerate previously)


Yes.  I also find I need to look back so that I can see better how I have improved.  My goal is to get back to where I was before my setback.  I am better at this point in time to what I was 2 weeks ago - even 1 week ago when we first put the board up in the window.  Then when I get back to that point to keep moving forward if possible (I say if possible because of the other factors I deal with and they are all connected and seem to affect each other).  But even to be able to get back to where I can go into the supermarket, even with ear plugs (which is what I have been able to do for a couple of years before this setback) will be great!  I wouldn't even attempt that at the moment as I wouldn't be able to walk back out of there...2 weeks ago I did attempt to go into a quieter part of the shopping centre but that proved to be too much. 
So it's all about trying, testing, proving, retrying, in little baby steps. But we have to keep taking those little steps.

Quote:

but in my own case it is not because of fatigue. It does not matter how tired i am ....
 it's how sensitive my hearing/ears are at the time.


This is where I believe I differ from the 'typical' hyperacusic - I don't have sensitive ears - I don't get pain or any physical reactions in my ears themselves.  I have fatigue all the time due to how my body responds to all stimuli.  Noise makes it so much worse.  When the fatigue is worse the way noise (and all stimuli) affects me gets worse - if I don't get respite then over time this leads to a setback and then it is impossible to gain any improvement until I get ongoing respite. 
When I am more fatigued than (my) normal, from either extra stimulation, noise or just at the end of the day then I perceive sound as louder than it really is. 

Interesting what you have said about what you can tolerate with kitchen appliances.  We have a cappuccino machine and a food processor which before my setback I was able to use with my heavy duty muffs (or earplugs) on.  I only use the processor about once a week.  A week ago I couldn't use them at all and had to leave the room if my dh was using the coffee machine.  I can now use the coffee machine again myself with my ear muffs or earplugs.  I can only make coffees though for 2 people - that is long enough to be exposed for now.  I haven't used the processor as yet but will need to in a few days. 
We don't have a dishwasher but we have a loud large chest freezer which I have been coping with even though it is fatiguing.  We have just bought an upright freezer to replace it - just to minimize unnecessary excess noise.  No one likes it - not just me.
I have soft rubber matting down on the kitchen cupboards to minimise kitchen noise...cups, plates, cutlery, saucepans etc being banged on the cupboard tops - all helps minimise fatigue for me and allows me to be able to work longer in the kitchen and just cope longer generally.  Not only helps minimise fatigue but eliminate the chance of a sudden, sharp/loud 'noise accident' which will set me back a whole day or more.  But I haven't had to as far as having all plastic ware - I could easily have done that a fortnight ago but thankfully was able to ride through it. 

Quote:

I think it can  help to understand how sound affects us on an individual basis as well - and understand that - it can change, as we are able to tolerate more in the way of sound...Or sometimes when our hearing/ears are  more sensitive....
When my hearing/ears are more sensitive - I take it easier around sound.



Yes..I have realised too that just because I may not be able to tolerate certain sounds today it doesn't mean I may not be able to tomorrow...this makes it hard for others around us to know what noises are ok and what aren't doesn't it...- we hardly understand why, let alone others...Sometimes I feel others are watching on trying to 'catch me out'.  They will question why a certain noise didn't affect me or how come I could tolerate this or that noise and not a certain other noise that may have been louder to them...I tell them I have no idea why it is like that - it is just as it is at that moment in time.  The last thing we need is for other people to be judging us on what we should or shouldn't be able to tolerate! 
An example - one night about a fortnight ago when my tolerance levels were really down I was sitting in the dining room and my dh was in the kitchen - he dropped something into the sink that sounded like a stone being dropped from a fair height.  I had a bad reaction.  He told me then it was just a piece of pawpaw he dropped from about 30cm!! 
In contrast a couple of days ago I dropped the lid of the kettle on to the sink top from about 20cm and it made a clatter and hardly affected me at all (it would have if there had been ongoing exposure).  My son heard it from his bedroom and couldn't work out why I never reacted to it on the spot!! 

Hope everyone are enjoying better days.

Lou


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