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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #1 
How many here find themselves exhausted after only a few hours being exposed to sound? I find my h/t minimal in the morning but shortly after an hour of t.v. or music, my ears cannot deal with the sound and I am in need of a nap. I am still trying to detect a lot of abnormalities that Ive encountered over the past year and a half. Being tired all of the time is a true discovery.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #2 
Same here Paul ... I get tired when pushing my boundaries with sounds, and have to rest. This is because you have aversion to the sounds. Seems fatigue is common among many with hyperacusis/phonophobia. So you're okay!

I wouldn't focus on trying to detect abnormalities - it's all normal in the world of hyper.

If you've quit the ear devices, you may want to start working on those again. Like Breeze and Rob have mentioned you should try to see Gail Brennen ( Not sure on the name, but you know who I mean ).

John
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catlady2323

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Reply with quote  #3 
"Sound fatigue" - what a great phrase ! 

The type of hyperacusis I have  does not involve any ear pain, and no tinnitus.  The discomfort and pain I feel is all "psychological", a very real, very intense debilitating pain, with no psychological source.  Since I have lived with this hidden neurological condition for over 5 decades, I have alot of experience and understanding on how it impacts me. 

I definitely experience "sound fatigue".  Man made noises quickly cause me to feel overwhelmed, unable to think in complete sentences, and frustrated because I can't get any work done.  Even moderate, normal noise levels quickly cause me to become exhausted.  I find having the TV on in the background intrusive, as well as music or common noises, like that caused by traffic.   For me it is exhausting having to battle my way through the onslaught of constant noise, to accomplish what needs to be done.

I now plan for sound fatigue, and schedule myself for noise breaks, just like athletes plan for fatigue, and plan to take breaks from their activities.  Long before I reach my breaking point (and become angry and frustrated), I just excuse myself from the noise causing situation.  When the noisy situation is going to be long event, I then plan for from 1 to 3 days of recuperation time afterwards, in which I will not have exposure to noises that bother me. 

"Sound fatigue" is very real, and I suspect that for some, what is termed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, might well be just "Sound Fatigue" under another name.

Interesting thread, thanks for starting it,

Sharon

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #4 

Uncharacteristic fatigue has been a huge part of my auditory situation this last two years, especially during the initial months and 1st year.
It was like I was in adrenal fatigue, as if a night's sleep would last me just 1/3rd as long as any time else in the rest of my life....except when down with the flu or something.

One thing I find interesting to note is that in Chinese Medical Theory/acupuncture/shiatsu/martial arts/anything from the Asian medical traditions,
the ears are associated with the kidneys and the adrenals - 'kidney chi' (or ki, which stands for 'vital energy') it is called.
Kidney chi is consdered the deepest and most profound source of wellness and energy, and depletion is noted in symptoms such as fatigue, even ear symptoms.
And what affects the ears can affect K chi and vice-versa.
I do think that these correlations are based in knowledge/wisdom and that assessing kidney chi with an acupuncturist or skilled Chinese Med specialist when the ears are affected could help support both the ear and the person's overall energy, as well as help preserve the K chi for the long term instead of letting it continue to be taxed.

Any of this can be readily searched on the web for any who are interested, and a good local acupuncturist who really knows his/her stuff and perhaps also deals with herbs might be a big help.

I personally am looking forward to doing this when I can soon.

Debbie


ps http://www.itmonline.org/5organs/kidney.htm
this link is pretty involved and perhaps only interesting to those truly interested in acupuncture theory
but it does clearly also describe the inter-relationship between ears and kidney chi channel and tripple warmer/tripple burner mentioned by a poster in the 'positive messages for my conscious and unconscious mind' thread.

 

__________________
Breathing is good.
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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #5 
Interesting Debbie i tried an acupuncturist but unfortunately he wasn't of asian technique/influence. he was board certified in America which was a real blah! I should consider a Korean or   "real" based specialist in this!
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #6 
These challenges can cause alot of stress,
stress can hard on our systems in many ways  -
Finding ways to alleviate and diffuse stress, can  be extremely helpful -
it may not be the sound itself in some cases -
it may be the stress that is being caused by sound that is either too difficult to tolerate, and/or bothersome.
The reaction to the sound - that causes the stress ...that depletes ones energies on many levels .....

I think that can happen sometimes - especially around sound that is ongoing for a long period of time and too difficult and/or bothersome.
I think some notice it with hyperacusis and others notice it with tinnitus -
(and I think it may have something to do with the autonomic and limbic systems)

and Debbie has mentioned before -

Quote:
Controlling, and transforming anxiety is like gold.

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marilyn

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Reply with quote  #7 
Here's an interesting website relating to our ears/stress. 
http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/stress.html#stressnoise

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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thats a lot of information and very interesting!
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #9 
I agree, very interesting thread Marilyn, thanks!
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #10 
Also about sound and fatigue -
There was an article i read awhile back that mentioned something about music being recorded and
produced as well as  remastered,  to sound louder overall.

To the point that the dynamic range is not what it had been - In some cases not even close.
It looses the subtle nuances and the effect is that it sounds louder overall -
instead of having peaks of being louder, and places where it is much softer.

And one of the things that was mentioned -was one of the effects some were noticing, from listening to music that is recorded or remixed to sound much louder  overall - was fatigue from listening to it - after not too long of a time frame.

Paul you mentioned-
How many here find themselves exhausted after only a few hours being exposed to sound? I find my h/t minimal in the morning but shortly after an hour of t.v. or music, my ears cannot deal with the sound

What are you listening to for music? And does it make a difference  if you listening to music in a compressed format? - Would you have the same thing happen, listening to the same music on an older album?

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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #11 
I listen to digital broadcast radio in my truck,at work. It is so loud and over bearing at times I turn it off. It is booming in the lows and shrill in the highs. it isn't soft or accommodating to my ears at all. On top of that,I listen to a two way radio for security calls and it just squawks all day. By the time I get home,I am exhausted.
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #12 
John mentioned-

I get tired when pushing my boundaries with sounds, and have to rest. This is because you have aversion to the sounds.

Hi John,

It may be that you are specifically talking to Paul about the aversion to sound - (and your experience as well)
but in my case that is not true - i have no aversion to the music i listen to, but can only push my tolerances so far at a time. I can only listen at a louder volume, especially one that pushes my boundaries - for so long.
(The result is not that i become tired from it - it's that my hearing/ears become more sensitive to sound.)
But listening at a quieter/lower volume - is different, i can listen all day at this point,
at levels that are lower and comfortable , (depending on what i am listening to - if it's not too challenging for my ears) or leave music on in the background -  at levels that are lower.
Levels that are comfortable. Providing that my hearing/ears are not  more sensitive than they normally are these days.

Though there are times i may need to adjust the volume (turn it down further) or change what is playing - or sometimes turn it off - because of other sound that becomes present- such as a lawn crew showing up next door, or nearby   (Sound that is added that makes whatever i am listening to, and/or the volume  more difficult to tolerate)  I've  also found that sometimes what I am listening to may "clash" with other sound, instead of blend with it.
And at those times changing whatever i am listening to, or leaving on for background sound  -
to something I am able to tolerate - that blends with the other sound, even though on low volume -
somewhat masking it (instead of seeming to clash with it - which can make both sounds much less tolerable )  -  can be helpful.


Paul,
Thanks for your reply.

Part of the problem with the loudness of tunes played on the radio these days, according to what i have read  - is that most of the recording artists or companies  - want their music to sound at least as loud as everyone else's (they don't want it to sound less loud overall) - so that is part of why it is recorded/produced to sound louder. 
At least that is what i have read.

When you mention the following - it sounds like you are home, verses in the car or at work.

you mentioned-

I find my h/t minimal in the morning but shortly after an hour of t.v. or music, my ears cannot deal with the sound and I am in need of a nap.

And I wonder at those times, are  you listening to the TV and music at really loud volumes? If so it may help to turn it down some and see if that helps.


You also mention the following-

I listen to digital broadcast radio in my truck,at work. It is so loud and over bearing at times I turn it off. It is booming in the lows and shrill in the highs. it isn't soft or accommodating to my ears at all

Is there any way you can adjust the settings for the bass? - Perhaps to turn off the sub woofers, if it has them - or turn the bass down a bit - same with the treble - maybe dial it down just a touch, if that is allowable?

Either way I would at least try to turn off any sub woofers.

Also, to turn the volume down may be helpful.

If you turn the radio down, maybe you can also turn the volume down just a touch on the 2-way radio? (If that is allowable)
And still be able to hear it, as loud as necessary and quite clearly.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #13 

Quote:
I listen to digital broadcast radio in my truck,at work. It is so loud and over bearing at times I turn it off. It is booming in the lows and shrill in the highs. it isn't soft or accommodating to my ears at all. On top of that,I listen to a two way radio for security calls and it just squawks all day. By the time I get home,I am exhausted.

Hi Paul,

You say it makes you exhausted. You don't say it hurts you're ears. People have a natural aversion to some sounds found in reproduced audio. And people often develop a learned aversion to sounds that cause them problems. And people can often habituate to either.

What Breeze mentioned above is called dynamic compression, and it does make some recordings hard to tolerate, especially on a high end system. It is mostly found in rock music. But, on boom boxes and inexpensive playback systems that can't handle a wide dynamic range, dynamic compression can sound better, which is part of the reason they do it. Some just like rock music to sound "loud."

It's very easy to develop a dislike for sounds, and one thing that helps is stop listening to it before any detectable increase in aversion. So, only listen for the length of time you can comfortably listen, and then stop. Just try and push your boundaries occasionally.

You could also use sound enrichment on a portable player when listening to the squawking radio. Why not get a radio that does sound pleasant to you? Or does all music bother you? Also, digital broadcasts like HDRadio can be very irritating/fatiguing, so maybe listen only to FM.

Nothing wrong with bass, unless you have increased sensitivity to low frequencies, or a dislike of the sound. 

John

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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze
Hi John,

It may be that you are specifically talking to Paul about the aversion to sound - (and your experience as well)

but in my case that is not true - i have no aversion to the music i listen to, but can only push my tolerances so far at a time. I can only listen at a louder volume, especially one that pushes my boundaries - for so long.


Hi Breeze,

There's nothing wrong with having dislike to some sounds. Everyone does. In fact there is a whole culture of phobic people called audiophiles. All I have to do is exchange his Audio Analysis ($1200.00!) speaker cables or interconnects on our stereo system with a cheap brand and my dad will complain about the sound and say it's bright or irritating and may even say it's making his ears ring more later on. That's only if I tell him about it though. If I change the cables and never tell him he has no complaints and never notices. 

He has normal hearing. He is not the only audiophile affected this way.  How we hear is psychological, and as you can imagine people with hyperacusis will likely have more of these issues. 

So, I'm not saying you don't have increased sensitivity, which you clearly do, but doesn't mean you don't also have a dislike for some sounds (i.e. subwoofers, fireworks). 

Just guessing. 

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi John,

You mentioned -

Nothing wrong with bass, unless you have increased sensitivity to low frequencies, or a dislike of the sound.

In my case I still have  increased sensitivity, and more difficulty with the  low frequencies -
but my comment for Paul -
who does like bass, and has mentioned so in the past , and can apparently tolerate it -
is because of this comment from Paul -

Quote:
It is booming in the lows and shrill in the highs



I also prefer the sound systems of older days - without sub woofers.
And i imagine many around here probably have difficulty with sub woofers.
As some have mentioned music being easier to tolerate with them turned off.
For at least one person here,  i know itmade a difference between being able to listen to muisic at all - or not being able to do so..

I understand where you are coming from though - as if i remember right - you build that sort of equipment, and i think that may slant your opinion of those types of speaker systems.

You mention-
But, on boom boxes and inexpensive playback systems that can't handle a wide dynamic range, dynamic compression can sound better, which is part of the reason they do it.

That sounds like a line from the people who do that stuff to try to make others think it sounds better. I don't believe it. Not when it is mastered or remastered  to sound too loud overall.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #16 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze
That sounds like a line from the people who do that stuff to try to make others think it sounds better. I don't believe it. Not when it is mastered or remastered to sound too loud overall.

No, it's the truth. Many boom boxes and factory car stereos can't properly reproduce the wide dynamic range found in music. It can sound distorted or dull.

Systems with more distortion also tend to obscure quieter sounds, and so bringing those quieter sounds up in level can sound better on those systems. 

Sounding loud and being loud are too different things.

It's all about selling music. And some just like music to sound that way, it's what they are used to. Probably the more common reason for using it. I read about kids going on a field trip to hear a symphony play classical music. They complained about how quiet some of the sounds were. Maybe cause they were used to the compressed music kids usually listen to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze
I also prefer the sound systems of older days - without sub woofers.
And i imagine many around here probably have difficulty with sub woofers.
As some have mentioned music being easier to tolerate with them turned off.

Yeah, prefer is the key word. Why would many have difficulty with subwoofers? The ear is usually less sensitive to low frequencies. Maybe with music that has a lot of high level low frequency content, yeah could be a problem. Just use that tone control if you got one.

Thanks for bringing up dynamic compression. It's good for people to know about these things.

Best,

John

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #17 
Hi John,

About the compression in music and about it being remastered to sound louder -

you said among other things -

It's all about selling music.

That I agree with. And I've also heard that some very good performers play concerts that are known to be extremely loud. There is something about being loud that sells music.


About sound systems -
In my case i do prefer the sound systems of older days -
but also - i would not be able to tolerate the sound subs put out -
as I said i am still more sensitive to the lower frequencies.

And I would not have been able to even start listening to music again on a system where sub woofers could not be turned off. I was that sensitive to bass.

You mentioned-

Yeah, prefer is the key word. Why would many have difficulty with subwoofers? The ear is usually less sensitive to low frequencies.

It's not just the low frequencies - it's the intensity with which the sound is emitted or produced from them. It's not just standard bass.

Also as music is recorded / produced to sound louder overall - what do you think that does to the bass?

In my own case, i also have not not purchased a portable CD player- as i want one where any enhanced bass would be able to be, turned off..

You mentioned -
Sounding loud and being loud are too different things.

And the articles i read mention that as well, but they also say that the way music is recorded/mastered these days to sound much louder  overall - can cause people to notice it is more difficult to listen to - and that some report noticing fatigue from listening to music such as that.

Let's hope the artists and companies that support the movement away from that type of processing of their music - gain support.

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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
About sound systems -
In my case i do prefer the sound systems of older days -


Nothing wrong with that.

Quote:
Also as music is recorded / produced to sound louder overall - what do you think that does to the bass?


Makes it sound attenuated.

Quote:
And the articles i read mention that as well, but they also say that the way music is recorded/mastered these days to sound much louder  overall - can cause people to notice it is more difficult to listen to - and that some report noticing fatigue from listening to music such as that.

Let's hope the artists and companies that support the movement away from that type of processing of their music - gain support.


I completely agree, dynamic compression is bad news, and can make it sound more fatiguing. Never meant to suggest otherwise. But not necessarily on little 3 and 4 inch speakers that distort during dynamic passages. This music can sound okay on some systems. Some people even have dedicated (and less revealing) systems for listening to compressed rock music, so there ears don't get raked over the coals on there high end system.

John


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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #19 
Thanks for your reply, John -
Can you please explain what you mean by this -


I asked -
Also as music is recorded / produced to sound louder overall - what do you think that does to the bass?

and you replied -

Quote:
Makes it sound attenuated.


Please explain - what you mean - as I don't understand.
It seems it would increase the intensity of it dramatically.
(especially when played over systems with subwoofers. )

Why would the bass not have been set to the proper levels to begin with - without it being remastered to sound louder overall?




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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #20 

Dynamic compression compresses (attenuates) the loud parts of the music signal (including the bass) making it less dynamic. It reduces the dynamic range (loud to soft). When this is done it makes the quiet sounds  seem louder when listening at normal level. So, it sounds more noisy IMO. 

I actually don't turn up these recordings as loud, just because they can be unpleasant. 

Sometimes the recording engineer also attenuates the bass even more, as I understand. Not sure why, but it may have to do with bass being more demanding of a playback system, like I mentioned before.

John

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Billymoe

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi John and a QuieterBreeze
Playing music too loud for long periods of time is how I got Hyperacusis.
Music is also the best thing to use to build your tolerance back. Audio equipment has been a very passionate hobby of mine for about 40 years.
You mention listener's fatique, recordings sounding to loud, and dynamic compression. Lets take compact discs as an example, since this is what most people are listening to. The output level of a compact disc is 1.2vrms. The output of a average vinyl record is .33vrms. That's almost four times louder. They are recorded at a hotter level, because the medium can handle it. This doesn't make them sound better. Most people tell me they sound tinny and harsh on orchestral music.
A compact disc has to take the digital componet an change it back to analog so we could hear it. During this process you loose nuances, which you mention in your other post. I love having people come over and watch their jaws drop when I put on a Frank Sinatra or Beatles record or reel to reel tape , which is even a little better. They say its not loud, but you still feel like his in the room. The key is that music does not have to be loud to hear all the subtleties in the recording.
     Their are ways to deal way with extreme dynamic range in cds and dvd movies. They are compression, limiting and leveling. I have using these componets for about 10 years and have been listening to music at about 70db, which is louder than you think with the right equipment, and I had Cat4 Hyperacusis.
   This might seem a little extravagant for the average listener of music. Another suggestion might be to buy a pair of Sennheiser open air headphones They have very little listeners fatique and no booming bass. Low frequency sounds have long wavelengths which gives you listeners fatique and bone conduction.
   HI Paul
I also have to listen to radio at work,but I try listen to it just at the point where it is just intelligible. When listening to music it is always important I take at least a 15-30 break, after about an hour of listening. I wouldn't be writing this if I would've followed this routine for the last 40 years.
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #22 
Another suggestion might be to buy a pair of Sennheiser open air headphones

Billy, was it you that I was talking about the Sennheiser open air headphones with one time?  I used a pair of vintage HD-455 Sennheisers when I worked with broadband noise as part of a game plan to re-establish my sound tolerance.  I even found a brand new still-in-the-box unopened pair on eBay that I eventually used.  They are incredibly comfortable headphones with terrific sound quality.  Not as good as the top-of-the-line Sennheisers made these days, but still very good considering the price, and they are easily worn for hours upon hours.  And, being open, I didn't block out external sound.  

Rob
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matts123

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Reply with quote  #23 

I still think it is amazing how our ears can feel sensitive or the ear drums feel tighten up just by thinking about music or a certain noise. Like if you know you will be going to a store or restraurant that will have music playing and you foresee the discomfort it may bring.

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Billymoe

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Reply with quote  #24 
hI Rob
I'm glad you caught that. I just went on e-bay to look for those but couldn't find them, so I went to the Sennheiser website, and they have a HD-555, which is also open aire for $169.95 I totally agree with you with these headphones. I think this is the best way to build up tolerance to sound.
The reason being music is constant, it has no breaks, and contains the whole frequency sprectrum.
  For people with Cat4 Hyperacusis a pair of HD-414 might even be better. They were made in the late 70's and early 80's. They had yellow ear pads. They sounded so airy, you forget you were listening to music.
  Those were the days when there was no difference between the mass market and high end audio market. You could buy equipment used in studios in a place like Korvettes, which is equivalent to going to Walmarts today.
Bill M.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #25 

Hi Bill, 

Yeah, I know you use dynamic compression in your system, and I don't doubt your system sounds really good. But, for whatever reason CDs with dynamic compression sound considerably worse that those without. Maybe the processing involved or the amount of compression they use. 

What do use to compress your music Bill? I'm guessing it's analog equipment? 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill
You mention listener's fatique, recordings sounding to loud, and dynamic compression. Lets take compact discs as an example, since this is what most people are listening to. The output level of a compact disc is 1.2vrms. The output of a average vinyl record is .33vrms.
 

Yes, LPs output much less voltage and require more voltage gain. A phonopreamp needs about 60dB of gain to amplify the .5mV moving coil cartridge to 0.5V. But that doesn't limit the dynamic range. LPs have good dynamic range especially in the upper frequencies due to the preemphasis of those frequencies during recording. 

And, of course, it's all analog so no A/D & D/A processing like you mention.

Here's a interesting article on LP/CD dynamic range comparisons.

http://www.audioholics.com/education/audio-formats-technology/dynamic-comparison-of-lps-vs-cds-part-4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill
When listening to music it is always important I take at least a 15-30 break, after about an hour of listening. I wouldn't be writing this if I would've followed this routine for the last 40 years.

I think everyone has their tolerance limits, and these can even change from time to time. And you probably just pushed yours to far when you developed hyperacusis - just a guess. I don't think it has anything to do with hair cell damage. 

Anyway, I had a real problem with most recordings due the dynamic range. I just kept trying to listen to it and increased my tolerance levels. I can listen to what I want as long as I keep the volume low enough. I've  also been doing what Rob suggested in a thread awhile back, by turning up the volume just past your tolerances for a second and turning it down to a comfortable level. That has helped me get the volume up a bit, and I'll keep working at it.

I agree that music listening is a great way to increase your tolerances to sound. Of course ears need practice with lots of sounds though. 

I think if you started listen to uncompressed music now and then you'd find you could handle quite well after working with it for a awhile. If you want to.

John

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Billymoe

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Reply with quote  #26 
HI John
I just got finished talking to my coworker who has is own recording studio for about two hours. We always go back and forth with digital verses analog. He switched to digital, but I still prefer analog.
   I have a Behringer Ultramizer Pro DSP1424P, which can be used as a compressor, limiter or volume leveler. This is a digital unit
   I also use a Pro Art vacum tube analog vactrol leveling amplifier.
   I just ordered a Symetrix 422 Pro AGC Leveler Dynamics Processor.
   The only time I use peak limiting or compression is for cd's or Dvds
  All three units perform the similiar functions, however the more expensive units do it without squashing the signal.
     I read the article at audioholics.com  I did the same thing he did, recording vinyl records onto a pro audio card at 96khz 24bit sambling rate.
Actually they came out very close to the record. But as they say close, but no cigar.
     My phono cartridge is a Grado wooden Reference going into a Audio Research Sp-3a phono preamp. My favorite sound comes when I record vinyl using a Otari Mk3 2 Track reel to reel deck with a DBX157 decilinear noise reduction system. The DBX 157 converts my tape deck into total silence, and that it will do this with no degradation of sound that I can detect. It also increases the dynamic range. The results are truly spectacular.
  Take for example the soundtrack to West Side Story which was recorded in 1960. When listening to the 2 track tape your right on the stage. There is a feeling of having the instruments around you, there is a spatial presentation to it, which I believe is not found on cd's.
You also have to take into account the recordings I listen to. They are mostly recordings from the 1950's, 1960's and early 70's. The recording engineers were very astute at that time. RCA and Columbia used an EMT Plate reverb which gave ballad singers, and orchestral music a very full bodied sound.
   I also think it is a good idea to raise the volume for a second, but I usually do it for about 10 to 15 minutes
   I definitely pushed my tolerence levels to far. Listening at 90db for six hour sessions for 25 years, that might do it.
   As far as cell damage goes, I don't think medical science has a way of measuring damage due to loud exposure of sound. I've googled it, but couldn't find anything.
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #27 
To Bill, Rob, and John,

It may take me a bit to reply, but i want to thank you all for your replies and posts
 in this thread. The direction it has taken, really brought something into focus for me -
and got me thinking about some things, and i am thankful for the insight. I'll reply in awhile.
Thanks!
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #28 
Sounds like you've got a lot of nice audio gear play with Bill. I also prefer the sound of analog, through our LP rig (Our old Thorens TD125MKII with a Rabco SL8E linear tracking tonearm) is not working right now due to a broken phono cartridge - waiting till I can buy a real nice one.

I find when I listen to LPs too much it's takes some time to adjust going back to CD sound, kind of hard on the ears at first. Lately I've been listening only to high quality recordings on CD or SACD, and the other day I tried to listen to some lesser rock recordings and it was tough to listen to so I didn't listen long. Though I find I can readjust to the sound fairly quickly. Though very bad recordings I just don't listen to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill
I also think it is a good idea to raise the volume for a second, but I usually do it for about 10 to 15 minutes


Glad you're making progress, that's great! I just raise the volume to where it becomes uncomfortable for second (I couldn't listen long at that volume), then turn it down or off for few seconds. I then turn it to where it's comfortable. It helps my ears adjust (habituate) to a louder volume. I find this helps me listen comfortably at louder volumes over time as well as helping listen longer at lower settings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill
I definitely pushed my tolerence levels to far. Listening at 90db for six hour sessions for 25 years, that might do it.
   As far as cell damage goes, I don't think medical science has a way of measuring damage due to loud exposure of sound. I've googled it, but couldn't find anything.


Yeah, loud sounds can cause hair cell damage, I just meant that it could have been just one time that your auditory system wasn't up to the 6 hour session of listening that caused your hyperacusis. Also, sometimes when people first have hearing loss it causes compensation in the auditory system which can cause hyperacusis. I agree, it is good to keep the volume at reasonable levels especially when listening for long times.

John
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
To Bill, Rob, and John,

It may take me a bit to reply, but i want to thank you all for your replies and posts
 in this thread. The direction it has taken, really brought something into focus for me -
and got me thinking about some things, and i am thankful for the insight. I'll reply in awhile.
Thanks!


Look forward to hearing your thoughts Breeze.
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Billymoe

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Posts: 69
Reply with quote  #30 
Hi John
I had the Thorens TD125 with the Shure SME tonearn.
If it just a cartridge, there are lot of good cartridges at Audio Advisor.
That table is just as good as any $2000.00 table today.
Clean it up and buy a new belt for it.

Bill M.
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #31 

Bill,

Thanks for the info. Meant to reply earlier just got distracted with stuff. Yep, it's just a phono cart that is broken. I fixed up the table awhile back - cleaned it up, changed the bearing oil, bought a new belt, rewired wired it, mounted spike footers on the bottom. Worked real well till I bumped the tonearm and bent the needle. 

I read a review that said it was on par with the Linn Sondek LP12 in sound quality. I took it with a grain of salt. But, I trust your take on it - that's good hear.

John 

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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #32 
Hi Matt,

You mentioned -

I still think it is amazing how our ears can feel sensitive or the ear drums feel tighten up just by thinking about music or a certain noise. Like if you know you will be going to a store or restaurant that will have music playing and you foresee the discomfort it may bring

Why not go with the idea that in the restaurant you can request to sit in the quietest section, explain about hyperacusis if necessary - and also request for the music to be turned down if necessary? No one says you have to go on the busiest night, or at the busiest time.
Also keep in mind some places are quieter than others, and selecting one that is quieter verses noisy can be helpful.

As far as shopping in  a store? If it's too loud and difficult - for the most part, there are other places to shop..and as one works in appropriate ways to improve their tolerances, things can get easier .....
there are ways through these challenges and things can get better.

Though others know more about it  than i do - it sounds like you are describing a fear of sound., which can understandably go along with hyperacusis ......

Rob mentioned  in another thread awhile back -

Quote:
The good news is that decreased sound tolerance, fear of sound, and tinnitus are treatable challenges...... 


Wishing you better days.
aQB


To Rob, Bill and John,

I am still behind on that reply mentioned earlier, but have Not forgotten ---
Thanks again, for your posts/replies  in this thread and the thoughts they brought to mind.

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