The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
mgc

Registered:
Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #1 
Good Morning,

I would like to purchase a sound decibel meter for events that I would like to measure. I would like something portable. For example, I would like to use it to check the decibel level of the vibra-cussor machine that my chiropractor uses. 

Can you give me some recommendations? Any particular model numbers and manufacturers?  I've looked online, but I have not a clue what I am looking at. I prefer not to pay more than $150. 

As all-ways, thank you for your loving supportive help. I love hearing success stories. I am hopeful that if you can be successful, so can I.

Louise
0
david

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #2 
I use the iPhone "Decibel" application.  I've also downloaded the "Signal Scope" application that shows the different frequencies that are being presented.  That has helped me craft a program that is progressively more challenging both in terms of volume and frequencies.

That is available for iPod Touch or the iPhone.  Those both cost around $200, but the decibel meter app is $1 then.  The Signal Scope ap is around $30.  Might be something to consider if you're also in the market for a new cell phone...
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi David,

Thanks for your post - (I would not have guessed an iphone would have such things available - but then I don't have one. Though I know someone who does and he may find the decibel app -  handy. And if it is fairly accurate i imagine others may as well. For those without these challenges, that have no idea of the sound levels they are around at times - it could perhaps be helpful to help them to become aware - before they do wind up with tinnitus, or hyperacusis, or hearing loss.)

Though for those with these challenges, i have heard it is best not to get too hung up on using a sound meter, though i am sure there are some times it would be handy.
(Such as perhaps for that protocol you mentioned)


You said -
I use the iPhone "Decibel" application.  I've also downloaded the "Signal Scope" application that shows the different frequencies that are being presented.  That has helped me craft a program that is progressively more challenging both in terms of volume and frequencies.

Does the "Signal Scope" or the "Decibel" application  - also show the volumes of the particular frequencies? (Or just the overall volume, which is what i would imagine a db meter would do?)
0
SkaMasta097

Registered:
Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Louise,

Here is what I use:

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103667&CAWELAID=107593122#

It is a tad bulky, but it has helped me greatly in dealing with my hyperacusis, and it's a heavy duty digital decibel meter for only $50. It is optimal for measuring music and soundsystems, but it works for measuring general sounds. I hope that helps.
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Skamasta,

You may want to post that link in the other thread David started, about  the Spanish Study.

Hi David,

The same is true with your post, maybe to copy it to the other thread - or the new thread you said you will start later would be helpful for some others who may happen across it later?

0
pattiluv

Registered:
Posts: 828
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi there,
does anyone know of an iphone or ipad app that tells you what is the db level of the music you are listening to in itunes on your ipad/ipod/iphone -- etc?

thanks

0
mgc

Registered:
Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. I appreciate it.

@David 
Ingenious idea about the iphone. I have a iphone version 1.0. It appears that some of the Iphone apps work for the 3.0 version.

Louise
0
david

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #8 

aQB--Signal Scope shows the dB levels of each individual frequency, the dB meter gives you an average of all frequencies. I've attached a picture of what signal scope looks like. 

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: photo.jpg, Views: 133, Size: 45.32 KB 

0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #9 
Hi David,
Thank you, for taking the time to post the image and explanation :-)
I wonder how accurate the frequency meter on the "signal scope" is?
0
pattiluv

Registered:
Posts: 828
Reply with quote  #10 
very interesting going around with my iphone sound meter
my tolerances seem high to me using this
like the db levels are higher than what i would have thought
makes me wonder if we really need to do ldl tests anymore?
just measure what we can handle with this thing!



0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Patti,

I wonder how accurate the db meter is as well?

Maybe  someone that does have a sound meter, and knows how to use it properly, would be able to take and  compare readings - for decibel levels..and let us know how accurate it is in comparison?
Decibel readings measured from the same source of, and level of sound at the same time , (or extremely close to the same time, if that is not possible)
and from the same direction, and at the same distances - I wonder how they would compare?

Patti, Are you also checking the different frequencies with your iphone? Ot just the overall levels of sound?
0
david

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #12 
Here is the app I use:
http://www.gadgetfrontier.com/apps/decibel
They claim they are very accurate per their own tests, but of course, it is for recreation. 
Here are some independant reviews:
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/decibel/id290788852?mt=8

Just curious, Breeze....why all these questions about accuracy?  Are you comparisson shopping?  Do you have an accuracy specification in mind? 
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #13 
Hi David,

Thankyou for the information, I have not checked the links yet.
No, I am not comparison shopping, (and I do not have an iphone, or a sound meter) though I  think having an app like that could be useful to some people -
such as if in a movie theater and if someone really wonders about the sound levels ...
or at a concert for someone even without these challenges .....
To use something like that at a concert could perhaps give someone an idea of the difference in volume between different seating locations .....
And perhaps an idea of the overall volume of some bands ......
or how loud some other very noisy  event is ....

Or for someone in a pub or club,  that may have had a few drinks and is not sure if they can trust their perception of sound .....perhaps it would come in handy?
(To know how loud it was when one first got there, if the level was ok and how loud it gets latter ..... maybe that could be helpful? )

The reason i ask about accuracy is because, if i remember right -  i have read that a 3db increase in reading, (on a sound meter) is equivalent to a doubling in the intensity of sound - and a 10 db increase in reading is equivalent to a doubling of the volume of sound.. (Or the perception of it anyway)

But others know ALOT more about sound than  I do,
And I hope someone who knows more about this than I do,  will PLEASE correct me if I have that wrong.)

And I think  both those numbers, and the ones in between them  as well - could represent quite a difference, especially when one is talking about Loud sound .

To double the volume of a whisper may not be loud....... but
seeing how (if i understand correctly)  somewhat small increases can translate to quite a bit more in the way of sound - (especially when one is talking about loud sound)
I  think  it would be interesting and useful for people with these challenges, and hyperacusis in particular, who do wish to use such a device to know how accurately it measures sound in relation to a sound meter.

P.S. Also, my curiosity about such applications is not just for those with these challenges, but for people who do not have T or H - that may still go to loud venues and concerts,
that something like that may give them a better idea of the levels of sound they are around. We can tell others about the levels of sound around which they should use hearing protection, but perhaps if some would actually see those levels for themselves (such as at a concert) maybe they would take some of the steps that could help them avoid these challenges in the first place..
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #14 
David,
You asked-
......why all these questions about accuracy?  Are you comparison shopping?  Do you have an accuracy specification in mind?

In my view - as accurate as possible, for both the aps - would be the best, and the most useful to anyone - with or without these challenges.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.