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Cheesecake

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Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi to everyone I hope you are all well. I have just joined the forum and would really appreciate any help or information people might have for me..

 I am 23 and live in the UK. I developed T 14 months ago for no apparent reason but in the past month the tone and volume has increased to an unbearable level. I had fluid behind my ears and an ear infection in the left (mostly affected) ear on this recent onset.  My ears are now clear according to the doctors but now apparently have pressure in my right ear and I have noticed the T to have increased in volume in this ear too. 

I believe I've had hyperacusis for many years without it bothering me or even knowing what it is. I've always suspected the banging/flinching sensation in my inner ear to certain noises to be catarrh but maybe this isn't so... In the last month since the infection the sensitivity to sounds has become unbearable, people's voices (not even spoken loudly) cause a banging sensation in my ear, it just feels like something inside my ear tightens or recoils to these sounds. As I said I have always had this to a degree but it hasn't been uncomfortable and it's never bothered me before so now I don't know why it is debilitating me so much.

I have an ongoing history of depression/anxiety and I'm finding this is making the GP's not take anything I say seriously, as though they think "oh well she has anxiety problems, her problems must be stress related". Can these problems not be physiological that can be treated somehow??  After 14 months of T I finally have a referral to an ENT specialist and am hoping this referral wont take too long!!

I am sorry this thread may be beginning to sound like a drone... I would just like to know of anyone else's experiences that might be somewhat similar, or anybody who has some information for me as how best to cope??

I would also like to add I do not have pulsatile T but I do have jaw problems and I grind my teeth in the night. From searching online it seems TMD/TMJ is related to pulsatile T and not the ongoing high pitched ring that I am experiencing.  Although since this month and my worseing T I feel that my jaw is even more clicky and when I move it side to side it doesn't glide, its jolty and clicky. Just wondering if this could be a further cause to my T.

Any help or advice would be great as I am really at a loss at the moment. This will be my third week off work which my doctor has kindly put on my docs note as being 'stress related'...

Kind Regards,

Cheesecake

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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Cheesecake,
It is so frustrating when the drs can't see past "stress". Yes stress can certainly contribute to many things but sometimes its the condition we are suffering from that causes the stress not the stress causing the condition.
Before I was dx with the BT I went to 3 drs...the first 2 put my symptoms down to my existing depression and told me to go home and get a good nights sleep!! If only that had fixed it!!  The 3rd dr took me seriously and within a week I had had an mri and there it was...I think I was more relieved than surprised to have a physical answer to my symptoms.
Keep searching for a dr who will look at it through open eyes and search all avenues to find out the cause.
It is possible that anxiety/depression could be contributing to your problem and if so that is a real condition of itself and not to be cast aside as if you can just fix it.  These will make tinnitus and hyperacusis worse but are not necessarily the cause of it.  Not knowing the cause is a 'stress' in itself - this is the stage I am in with my hyperacusis or extreme sound sensitivity.  At present I am unable to get to a specialist so trying to work out how to deal with it too without getting more depressed and anxious about it....

Hugs
Lou


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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #3 
I understand how you feel Kimberley... the healthcare system is atrocious I swear if there is something terribly wrong with me I will endeavor to sue my doctors for dismissing me as an anxiously depressed person!

Sorry angry burst over with. Do you take any current medications? I've just been prescribed Sertaline 50mg which I will begin tomorrow. I know of studies that have helped people with tinnitus, in regards to hyperacusis I'm not sure. I was on escitalopram and then citalopram but  I refused to take these as the side effects clearly state tinnitus.

I really think there is a problem with my myoclonus muscle in my ear as I can feel a muscle retract to noises. Is this hyperacusis? I am very confused been looking on google typing in my symptoms and I can't seem to find an answer. I know going to see an ENT is the best place to be diagnosed but I fear many are not aware of these disorders and so can easily overlook them.

Help anyone please?!!
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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #4 
Can you go to see a dr who specialises in Hyperacusis?  I don't live anywhere remotely near one and there is no way I can travel again for quite a while but if you can find one that would be the ideal thing to do.  I am relying on answers to some letters I have written...
I don't take any medication at all now...been off all meds since end of 2008...prior to that I was on Effexor XR antidepressants for 12 years then in 2007/2008 started taking Neurontin off and on for nerve pain...When I was trying to get off the Effexor we tried Excitalopram dn then Citalopram but side effects also made me quit them all...Who knows what toxic effects any of this may have had...add Radiotherapy into that whole mix...I am working really hard now to try and detox my body and brain and reduce inflammation through diet, probiotic foods, fish oil, essential oils etc...

Lou

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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #5 
Congrats on coming off all your meds Lou
It really is a good idea because you don't know what permanent side effects you might get from these drugs (something I am now learning)
I don't think that day will come for me anytime soon though, I need help to sleep and I think I need this sertaline to help me with my current Tinnitus. Took my first tablet today...

I was wondering if anybody had any experiences with TTTS as I have just self diagnosed myself due to no doctors taking an interest in my symptoms.  I can't find any recent posts from people about this area, there are people from maybe 2004/2005 who spoke about my exact symptoms but I don't think they are on here anymore.. I hope that means they are better now!

Anyway what I would like to ask is does TTTS go hand in hand with hyperacusis as I have had this thumping in my ears to sounds for a while but I've never felt it to be a decreased tolerance to sound. I'd never even heard of these syndromes until 2 weeks ago I've always attributed my problem to catarrh and therefore not really seen it as a problem. The past 3/4 weeks it has been a problem though, a debilitating one and I'm not sure where I go from here. I feel as though the problem is physical, maybe the muscles are reacting more because my T in that ear has suddenly worsened..

I would be interested to hear from anyone who has taken meds to relax these muscles with some effect?

Sorry for all these questions, really confused at the moment though I think I need to know what's wrong with me before I can see a way forward.. I have plans for my life things I want/need to do in the next month, at the moment I feel like my future is over, I'm only 23 and this is something very hard to accept

P.s I apoligise if this message is a little morbid. I'm not a morbid person.. I just need advice... thanks guys

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kimberleydust

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Cheesecake - what is TTTS? and what symptoms does it cause?
Thanks

Lou
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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #7 
I took this from wiki:

In many people with hyperacusis, an increased activity develops in the tensor tympani muscle in the middle ear as part of the startle response to some sounds. This lowered reflex threshold for tensor tympani contraction is activated by the perception/anticipation of loud sound, and is called tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS). In some people with hyperacusis, the tensor tympani muscle can contract just by thinking about a loud sound. Following exposure to intolerable sounds, this contraction of the tensor tympani muscle tightens the ear drum, which can lead to the symptoms of ear pain/a fluttering sensation/a sensation of fullness in the ear (in the absence of any middle or inner ear pathology

This is the only info I can find on it other than what people have posted in forums. I've read of people having surgery to cut the muscle or some who have taken muscle relaxant meds. I can just imagin showing this info to my GP and them looking at me blankly, or at worst saying its stress related lol.

Hope your having a good day Lou

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Cheesecake,

Though I do not know what you are experiencing -
the following website has some helpful and useful information

http://www.tinnitus.org/home/frame/THC1.htm
 The Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Centre, London UK

Their download page has many articles and more information available as well.
including some articles in their download section ...
about tensor tympani syndrome.

Awhile back, in a post to some people on this board, 
Rob mentioned -

Quote:
you may appreciate the seminal paper on tensor tymapni syndrome written by Klochoff - who coined the term.


http://www.tinnitus.org/home/frame/Tensor%20tympani%20syndrome_Klochoff.pdf 


 There is also another article called "Things That Go Bump In The Night"- that you may find interesting ...
if you are curious about tensor tympani syndrome.

Also, in doing a search for this
I found that Rob has mentioned in several different posts -  that a reduction in caffeine intake may be helpful for those with Tensor Tympani syndrome, and that it   can also be related to stress.

Here is one of those posts -
Rob mentioned -

Quote:
John,

How much caffeine do you have each day?  Do you drink coffee, Coke, etc?  If one of the symptoms you are describing is related to your tensor tympani muscle, it could help to alleviate those symptoms to some degree by cutting back on caffeine. 

The increased muscle activity of the tensor tympani can have a great deal to do with tension and stress.  In our case, the stress may be exacerbated by one's reaction to hyperacusis or tinnitus.  Addressing the stress often reduces the hyperactivity of the tensor tympani muscle.  At one of the premiere facilities in Europe for treating hyperacusis and tinnitus, The Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Centre, more than 40% of patients have symptoms related to the tensor tympani muscle. 

Irregular clicking sounds in the ear can be related to palatal myoclonus.   

Rob



P.S. Though i have been hesitant to say something ....
Is there any way to make the horse you use as an avatar move more slowly or stand still? Please?
 It is very distracting for me, and I know some around here have difficulties with the moving images on the screen - though to me some are just distracting and with some at least, I wish they would not be moving -
but some others around here have a Lot more difficulties with them.
Marilyn recently mentioned she was having a hard time using her computer in part because of the moving images on the screen. (even when typing or when a web page loads) So if there is something you can do about that, it would be probably be appreciated, by others as well.

Also From what you mention, I wondered why you wish to order the pink noise CD? (as you asked about it in another thread.)
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kimberleydust

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Posts: 91
Reply with quote  #9 
Good Morning!

Thanks for the info on TTTS - I also found info here

http://www.dineenandwestcott.com.au/hyperacusis.php?fid=1

I makes good sense about the startle response (stress response) will cause tension in these muscles...just the same as a stress response causes our neck and shoulder muscles to tighten up.
Anything we can do to minimise the bodies reactions to anxiety and stress has to help it as a whole. Different areas can be affected more in different people.
This is where I feel that no matter what the reason is for our tinnitus or hyperacussis we can all benefit from sound enrichment and TRT if available to you or even anything at all that will help minimise stress and anxiety levels.

kind regards
Lou

ps My eyes have trouble with the moving horse too!





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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hi :Lou,

 It's evening where I am and almost summer. (The lawn mowers have come out of hibernation again) Winter is quieter.

Stressful reactions to sound are Very common among those with hyperacusis, and sometimes (perhaps many times?) with tinnitus as well.
And some may have those reactions to sound - without having hyperacusis or tinnitus as well.

To help alleviate, diffuse and eliminate stress if possible can be very helpful :-)

You mentioned
This is where I feel that no matter what the reason is for our tinnitus or hyperacussis we can all benefit from sound enrichment and TRT if available to you or even anything at all that will help minimise stress and anxiety levels.

I was glad to hear you found something, in the way of sound -  that by the sound of it - is easy on your ears and hopefully soothing to  your ears as well.
I think that can be helpful in a few ways at least......

I have been  hoping to reply in that other thread as well, but have not gotten back there yet.

Wishing you and everyone here brighter days, and rainbows after storms,
aQB

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kimberleydust

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Posts: 91
Reply with quote  #11 
Good Evening aQb!!
It is Winter where I am (Northern Australia) Well it is supposed to be winter - where I live we really only have 2 seasons Wet & Dry and we are now in the dry but winter everywhere else...so our days are just the best - beautiful blue clear skies and around the 28 degrees.
Yes I am enjoy water sounds and hope to go and brave the shops soon to find a table top water feature - at the moment I have Aire Freshener playing on the Fountain sound and just leaving that on all day...it's better than focusing on all the horrid outside noises!!  Oh the world today is sooo inconsiderate!!!!
Yes one has to keep looking for and seeing that rainbow hey...all I've been looking for lately is a hollow log but there's no bright future in it....rainbows are much prettier...

Lou

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Cheesecake

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Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you everyone for your replies

aQb I have read that PDF just now thank you for the information.  I have also nearly completely stopped my caffeine intake (must have a cup of tea when I get up!) I am feeling a lot calmer today I think the sertaline is helping me that way also last night my sleep wasn't too bad but I think maybe for the first 3 days of these new meds I will be more drowsy, kinda hope it doesn't wear off though..!
I am interested to buy the pink  noise CD as I hear it is good for tinnitus and hyperacusis stymptoms. I'm not overly sure I have hyperacusis but I believe I am suffering with the TTTS and whether this goes hand in hand with hyperacusis is a little confusing for me. I don't have a dislike of most sounds and I don't feel as though things are louder than what they actually are. I think the muscle in my ear is overreacting to certain sounds which are not loud, I hear it contracting in my ear from my own voice!

Lou thank you for that website it really does outline what I am experiencing at the moment. I found this part particularly interesting:
TTTS is often associated with the development of temporary tinnitus or an increase/change in pre-existing tinnitus.

The left ear is particularly bad for contracting to little sounds and this ear has also got a very loud ringing in it as oppose to my normal level of T. 
Lou I am also using the Aire Freshener program and I use the fountain sound too it is very relaxing. I also shopped around for a table top water fountain!! Not got one yet let me know if you find a good one!!

I have just made an appointment to see an ENT (privately) for next Tues. The tinnitus and hyperacusis centre in London seems to be the only place in the UK that deals with  hyperacusis I rang up the British Tinnitus Association and they confirmed this. I can't however afford the £300 initial consultation fee, I'm also not 100% I have what I have self diagnosed, although I am pretty sure of it. I hope that a normal ENT who specialises in tinnitus will be able to help me somewhat with hyperacusis.

aQb I have removed my avatar and apoligise.  I didn't realise it had that effect on screen on my computer it moves very slowly on mine but I think I have a slooow internet connection speed!!

Hope you are all well, I wish I was in Australa right now... though the sun is shining brightly in the North of England today!!

Cheesecake
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Cheesecake,

you mentioned-
 I have also nearly completely stopped my caffeine intake (must have a cup of tea when I get up!

Depending on how much caffeine someone drinks - if one decides to cut  way down or quit -
I wonder if it would  be helpful to taper down slowly ......instead of quitting  all at once.
As I think stopping too suddenly can lead to withdrawal symptoms.....such as bad headaches.
And of course being noticeably more tired for awhile.
So in my view to taper down slowly if possible would be a good idea.

(Though others around here  know more  about how caffeine, or cutting back on it may affect tensor tympani syndrome.)

Thankfully the tensor tympani syndrome  symptoms are not something I experience.

Thanks for removing your avatar, (the briskly running horse ) that was kind!
As I mentioned i was hesitant to say something. Though if you want to use a graphic, maybe you will find something else - that is to your liking, and perhaps holds still :-)
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Cheesecake

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Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #14 
Hehe briskly running horse, that amused me. I will find a nice calming photo that will benefit all!

I haven't experienced any headaches as of yet so maybe I've been lucky. I don't think I am really caffeine dependent only usually when I'm doing long shifts at work, but I am off sick at the moment so not using up much of my energy. Although plan to go the Lake district tomoro for a walk I hope it'll clear my head a little.
aQb could I ask if you feel in your opinion that I would benefit from buying the pink noise CD? being in the UK I'm unsure how I pay for it do I need a bankers cheque so that it is redeemable in the US

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi all, want to add my new 'pet' thoughts on the possible l connections with tts and hyperacusis.

Actually thoughts gleaned from observation of my own symptoms for the last two years...and from reading everything new and much of the old on this board during that time, as well of plenty of reading elsewhere including into PubMed and Medline scientific article databases.

It is clear that much is unknown when it comes to the auditory system and the interconnections between it and other aspects of neurology.

As I posted elsewhere recently, there are known links between "basal ganglia" (located within the brainstem) injuries...whether through genetics, hormones, autoimmune responses, environmental chemical impacts, direct physical trauma to peripheral and local nerves...or (perhaps convening factors) and localized OR generalized muscular activity disorders, some linked to the startle response.

Myoclonus (though not specifically of the ear - but why not??) is one of the many listed forms of such a basal ganglia-based "movement disorder."

I am curious to note that the basal ganglia is also believed to be the home of functions which, when disregulated various ways, can show up as depression, ADD, and many other conditions which people on this board commonly report have long predated the auditory conditions which bring them here to this board.

I just wonder if there is some vulnerability or predisposition (a direct or indirect genetic link or combination, direct meaning a vulnerability or pre-programed weakness in certain aspects of the basal ganglia, indirect meaning a genetic predisposition to be sensitive to a substance or hormone or other impact which is known to put some sort of stresses on the physiology of the basal ganglia) 
that people with these multiple symptoms...or a family history of some of them...might be dealing with.

Perhaps the basal ganglia is somewhere to begin exploring for some more puzzle pieces on tts, myoclonus, and even the potentially confusing or misleading histories of anxiety and depression, or OCD, or ADD, etc.
Even "misophonia" which we discuss a lot about on this board and seems to hold many parallels between conditions on the OCD spectrum.

Perhaps, and of course this is total conjecture, the irony is that in some cases, variations of these combined health histories may be linked due to physical impacts to the basal ganglia.

I have not looked specifically and maybe research has not even begun to do so either, but I'm just wondering if some hyperacusis could also emerge from interactions between this region and the auditory regions. 

I am mentioning this just in case anyone sees an enlightened neurologist or oto (ear)-neurologist who also works in a multi-disciplanary way, maybe some bright ideas could occur for best meds or other, possibly cutting edge treatements for the central nervous system, and/or ear treatments.
Or maybe, simply the start of some new medical curiosity, out of the box thinking and the impetus for serious, new clinical research.
I do think that the findings of such newly inspired clinical research might possibly lead to answers which might benefit people far beyond the hyperacusis/tinnitus/tts/myoclonus community. 

Maybe by taking some of the knee-jerk assumptions out of a diagnosis of tts, tinnitus or depression, anxiety etc., we could learn some new and exciting things that lets us interpret these conditions in new ways that lead to better treatments, prevention and cures.

I'm posting the following quick article on the basal ganglia just because it seems to provide a quick overview with a handy graphic, there are certainly countless scientific sources to read from on the basal ganglia.
I do not know the sourcing of this author's specific information, only that the links he presents between the basal ganglia and the conditions he mentioned seem to be "common knowledge" when one looks most anywhere for this information.
I would suggest a process of cross-referencing for anyone who is interested in verifying this information.

And of course this information may be relevent or totally irrelevant to any one person's situation! I'm sure I should have posted this information on a new thread, just for anyone interested in doing any "extracirricular" reading...and in fact may do that when time permits.

Best to all,

Debbie


The Basal Ganglia

Dr. C. George Boeree

 


The basal ganglia are a collection of nuclei found on both sides of the thalamus, outside and above the limbic system, but below the cingulate gyrus and within the temporal lobes.  Although glutamate is the most common neurotransmitter here as everywhere in the brain, the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA plays the most important role in the basal ganglia.

The largest group of these nuclei are called the corpus striatum ("striped body"), made up of the caudate nucleus ("tail"), the putamen ("shell"), the globus pallidus ("pale globe"), and the nucleus accumbens ("leaning").  All of these structures a double ones, one set on each side of the central septum.




The caudate begins just behind the frontal lobe and curves back towards the occipital lobe.  It sends its messages to the frontal lobe (especially the orbital cortex, just above the eyes), and appears to be responsible for informing us that something is not right and we should do something about it:  Wash your hands!  Lock your door!  As these examples are meant to suggest, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is likely to involve an overactive caudate.  On the other hand, an underactive caudate may be involved in various disorders, such as ADD, depression, aspects of schizophrenia, and just plain lethargy.  It is also involved in PAP syndrome, a dramatic loss of motivation only recently discovered (see below).

The putamen lies just under and behind the front of the caudate.  It appears to be involved in coordinating automatic behaviors such as riding a bike, driving a car, or working on an assembly line.  Problems with the putamen may account for the symptoms of Tourette's syndrome.

The globus pallidus is located just inside the putamen, with an outer part and an inner part.  It receives inputs from the caudate and putamen and provides outputs to the substantia nigra (below).

The nucleus accumbens is a nucleus just below the previous nuclei.   It receives signals from the prefrontal cortex (via the ventral tegmental area) and sends other signals back there via the globus pallidus.  The inputs use dopamine, and many drugs are known to greatly increase these messages to the nucleus accumbens.

Another nucleus of the basal ganglia is the substantia nigra ("black substance").  Located in the upper portions of the midbrain, below the thalamus, it gets its color from neuromelanin, a close relative of the skin pigment.  One part (the pars compacta) uses dopamine neurons to send signals up to the striatum.  The exact function isn't known, but is believed to involve reward circuits.  Also, Parkinson's disease is due to the death of dopamine neurons here.

The other part of the substantia nigra (the pars reticulata) is mostly GABA neurons.  It's main known function is controlling eye movements.  It is also involved in Parkinson's, as well as epilepsy.




As you can see, quite a few serious problems are strongly associated with the basal ganglia.  Some, such as ADHD, Tourette's, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia, will be covered in other parts of this text.  Others are somewhat less psychological and more physical, but are still important....

Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's is characterized by tremor (shaking), rigid muscles, difficulty making quick, smooth movements, and difficulty standing and walking.  Many people also develop depression and anxiety and, later in life, problems with memory loss and dementia.

It usually develops late in life, but it can occur in younger people.  One well-known case is the actor Michael J. Fox.  It is very difficult for both the patient and his or her family.

Parkinson's is originates in the death of cells in the substantia nigra and the loss of dopamine and melanin produced by those cells.  It progresses to other parts of the basal ganglia and to the nerves that control the muscles, involving other neurotransmitters.  Possible causes or contributing factors include environmental toxins, head trauma, and genetics.

There are treatments available that slow the course of Parkinson's and alleviate the symptoms.  Most involve replacing or mimicking the lost dopamine and other neurotransmitters.  Unfortunately, the disease slowly progresses to where the treatments only work for a few hours at a time.  Parkinson's does not directly cause death and many patients live long lives with it.

Huntington's disease

Huntington's is characterized by loss of memory and odd jerking movements called chorea ("dance").  It is a hereditary disease (with a dominant gene) involving cell death in the caudate nucleus.  It usually starts in a person's 30s, but may start at any age.

 There is no cure, but there are treatments that can reduce the symptoms. It is fatal, although it is complications of the disease that usually cause death, rather than the disease itself.  Many Huntington's sufferers commit suicide.

Cerebral palsy

People with cerebral palsy have various motor problems, such as spasticity, paralysis, and even seizures.  Spasticity is where some muscles are constantly tight and so interfere with normal movement.  This is the reason for the unusual hand and arm positions most of us have seen in people with cerebral palsy.

It is apparently due to brain damage, usually sometime before birth.  Causes may include fetal infection, environmental toxins, or lack of oxygen.

Although cerebral palsy tends to remain relatively stable throughout life, there is no cure and is very difficult to deal with for both the person and his or her family.

PAP ( or Athymhormic) syndrome

PAP is characterized by an unusual lack of motivation.  A dramatic case was that of Mr. M, who, while drowning, simply failed to try to save himself, even though a good swimmer.

Damage to the caudate nucleus means that nothing carries any emotional significance anymore.  Drowning?  Don't be concerned.  People with PAP also ignore the usual social and moral motivations we all take for granted.  They don't quite "get" that their lack of action could have significant consequences.

Without the motivating influence of the basal ganglia, the frontal lobe simply stops planning for the future.  Oddly, they can still respond to external motivation, such as a loved one's request or an authority's command.

See the April 2005 Scientific American Mind article by Patrick Verstichal and Pascal Larrouy for more on PAP syndrome.




© Copyright 2006, C. George Boeree






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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #16 
Cheesecake,
in another thread you mentioned - (to Lou)
I too had a brace for jaw alignment and I feel it messed my jaw up! I now have to wear a night guard on my bottom teeth because I grind them also my jaw is very clicky. Since I've been having my recent problems my jaw has been a whole lot worse, after eating my meal last night my jaw felt very tired and achey. I've had acupuncture in my jaw before now I only had it done once I felt it made it worse but maybe if I had it regularly it could help somewhat.

I don't know a lot about TTTS, or if that is what you have, or not  - (as I have no idea)
but wonder if what you mention (in the quote above) - could have something to do with what you are experiencing? (That you think may be ttts)
Perhaps it could be connected to the reason you need the nightguard? Perhaps connected to TMJ or TMD (if either  f those conditions would apply in your case)

Though I have no idea, and would not know - it's just something I wondered about.
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Cheesecake

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Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #17 
aQb thank you for your observation. I too have wondered whether this could be a cause or atleast a contributory factor. I have researched online about it and it seems people with TMD/TMJ have pulsatile tinnitus whereas mine is a constant ring. Maybe this is just a common type and not a rule but I was confused anyway. Going to see a specialist tomorrow and will definitely bring that up.

Thanks
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #18 
If the specialist you mention or any of your doctors recommends an MRI -
be sure you are given proper and appropriate hearing protection to use.

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Cheesecake

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Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #19 
I certainly will, or i'll ask if it's okay that I take my own. I had an MRI a couple of years ago before I had ear problems it is so so loud and I'm a very jumpy type of person so I couldn't keep my body still!
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kimberleydust

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Posts: 91
Reply with quote  #20 
Hi Cheesecake - each time I have had an MRI they have given me headphones....since H I also take my own earplugs - these are already in before I enter the hospital zone and don't come out till I have left it!!  Even then the MRI is still too loud for me but I have to tolerate it because it is important to see what my tumour is doing...
I am a bit concerned though - if it doesn't greatly improve between now and October before my next MRI I won't be able to fly to Perth to have it...anyway its a long way off yet...
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Cheesecake

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Reply with quote  #21 
You've got plenty of time before then Lou months and months take each day as it comes I think that's the best way to look at things. Yeah last time I had headphones with the radio playing, I couldn't hear much of the radio but was a nice distraction from the drilling noises that were making me jump!

Take care hope your having a nice day, I'm currently listening to the Most Relaxing Classical Album Ever, never really listened to classical before but some of the songs are so soothing...

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This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.