The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #1 
I watched a TV series over the past week or so, at about 2-4 30 minute episodes per day. I always watch at a pretty low volume with subtitles, but I try to keep it at the maximum volume I can handle because I enjoy it more this way. For the first few days my ears felt fine, not bothersome. By the time I reached the final few episodes, my ears had begun to feel more sensitive. I kept forcing myself through despite discomfort because not only was I invested in what was happening in the show, but it also seemed insane that the sound from my television on relatively low volume could have any real effect.

Anyway, I finished the show in much discomfort, and now I am in the middle of another full blown setback where my ears are burning, my face is tense, my head feels full of pressure, every sound has a tinny quality to it, and sounds I could handle 2 weeks ago are now painful to listen to.

This isn't the first time this has happened, either. In fact, earlier this year I had a very similar episode with a different TV show, although not quite as bad as this time.

It happens when I listen to too much music over several days as well, even at a low volume. It's why I am unable to see improvement with Jastreboff's music therapy for misophonia. You are supposed to raise the volume as you become more comfortable with the music, but I have to lower it because I become more uncomfortable with it.

These setbacks will then last for days or sometimes weeks, although typically they improve after the activity is ceased and I regress to my normal background sound therapy (low pink noise, background TV at a much lower volume, etc.) This is not good, though, because I enjoy watching movies and TV, they're some of the only pleasures I get in life, and putting it all on hold for my ears to recover makes life quite a bit more vapid for me.

I'm not sure why this keeps happening. Why do sounds that are comfortable become uncomfortable and cause setbacks after consecutive daily listening? I avoid silence and am constantly trying to expose myself to as much sound as I am comfortable with, but I just don't seem to get better, only worse.
0
BA

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #2 
hi

there are ear phones, that come with a gadget you place near the tv.  It means only you can hear the tv. They can control the sound quality, volume, bass levels etc, so maybe worth looking into.

not dear, so a good bang for the buck.

good luck
BA
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #3 
Explorer,

It just means you have aversion to these sounds. When you have an aversion to sound it limits the loudness and length of time you can listen to it. You just want to more gradually to these sounds as you can. You don’t want to force it, just keep trying.

There will times when you handle these sound better than others. But just keep trying to listen a bit longer like every week or couple of weeks. No rush and you don’t take things so fast that you develop a stronger aversion to the sounds.

Sure, sometimes symptoms will get worse and you have to play it cool for a few days and keep you head up. Do some reading about TRT also, if you haven’t yet.

0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Explorer, It just means you have aversion to these sounds.

[4X7nSX4] 

I don't strongly dislike the sounds that caused this setback, so saying I have an "aversion" to them is inaccurate.  In fact, I really enjoy these sounds, and the fact that they cause symptoms makes me sad, because it limits my ability to hear more of them.  I would love to be able to listen to these sounds all day, because I love these sounds.  "Love" is the literal opposite of "aversion".

Quote:
When you have an aversion to sound it limits the loudness and length of time you can listen to it. You just want to more gradually to these sounds as you can.

This is exactly what I've been doing since 2014 and it's worse than ever right now.  In 2015 and 2016 I could watch movies or listen to music for hours in perfect comfort with little to no symptoms.  Over time I was able to tolerate this less and less.  Now I can't even get through one 30 minute show without worsening my symptoms.  This setback still has not gone away, and this is the longest setback I've had in over 3 years.  And it was caused by much less noise than what I was able to comfortably expose myself to in 2015-2016.

It gets worse over time, not better.   It's not that "sometimes" it gets worse.  It's that it steadily gets worse, despite my best attempts at desensitization.

Quote:
No rush and you don’t take things so fast that you develop a stronger aversion to the sounds.

It has been years.  I've been dealing with sound sensitivity since 2012.  There is nothing "fast" about how I am taking things.  I always slow down when I have reached my limit, and I rarely listen to anything if it causes me discomfort.
0
AnthonyO

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 107
Reply with quote  #5 

Dear Explorer, I have been reading and reviewing much of your posts in this thread.  I understand your heart and I fully understand your concerns.  I have felt the same frustration of this situation myself, over the past four years with hyperacusis.

Thank you for posting the clear definition between "Love" and "Aversion"; indeed those two terms, in plain English, are worlds apart from one another.

I too, many times like you, have had great difficulty listening to the sound coming from television sets, radios, ceiling speakers in supermarkets, outdoor P.A. systems and any electronically induced sound...whether it is amplified little, what could be considered "normal', or loudly.

There is still so much to learn about hyperacusis...and it's two rivalling siblings, misophonia & phonophobia.  Still today, some of the leading experts either completely agree...or yet strongly disagree, on it's clear definition, presets, mechanics and manifestations.

But, when it comes to aversion, it does help to know, just what part of our brain has the "aversion" to a certain or group of sounds, or if it is a real neurological issue with the way our auditory system is "processing that sound" that puts up such a deterrent, and causes fatigue or pain, when trying our very best to become kin to that sound.

I too LOVE listening to TV, radios, outdoor speakers...and especially my very customized car radio system.  But, for the last 4 years of my life, it has been a "work-in-progress" to try to re-normalize myself to these (like I said before) "electronically-induced" sounds.

I can think of two other wonderful people on this Network, Margy & Kathy, who find difficulty to, with electronic sound, but do very, very well indeed, with "natural" sound, like a gentle breeze, wind blowing through the leaves of the trees, animals milling about, the brooks and streams flowing about, etc, etc...but when turning on a radio or the sound to a TV...which may just be clinically "softer in volume on a decibel meter", brings great fatigue, pain or neurological, muscular or vascular issue.  Forcing one's self to listen to a sound, over & over again, at even small or larger times frames, may or may not produce satisfactory, therapeutic or healing benefit.

As an engineer of audio and once producer of radio programming & broadcasts, I have come to see after contacting hyperacusis, that there is a world of difference, from the way the human auditory system processes "natural" sound opposed to "electronically-induced, duplicated or reproduced" sound.  We have seen this over & over again; how come a person with such auditory condition, can pleasantly walk by such natural outdoor sounds mentioned above...but when hearing those "same exact sounds" on a little laptop speaker or the overheard ceiling speaker at a fill-up station, show great consternation, frustration or even pain?

There is a difference, a huge difference, indeed.

Just this morning, as I was typing away on this very keyboard, I turned on some classical music on my 1993 Radio/CD Player and just after 10 minutes the stereo imagery and slight static in the background, seemed like it was giving me a headache!  However, me "banging-away" on the keyboard to write this post, does not cause illicit effect; nor does the very strong outside wind, due to very powerful Santa Ana wind currents, that are blowing around like dragons, here in Los Angeles!

I, just like you Explorer, used to enjoy watching and listening to TV, I have drawers of DVD's that made themselves my best finds over the past couple of decades, but the way my 2001 SONY Trinitron TV synthetically "reproduces" the sound "electronically" in it's speakers, gives me great fatigue, in just 5 or 10 minutes.

Due to all this, I have wired up a separate stand-alone analogue audio equalizer, per-amp/amplifier and old-school box speakers (because I have training in this field) to better control the "tone" of the signal and after tweaking and peaking with it for weeks, I can come up with an equalization pattern that best suites "my" current listening abilities, due to the hyperacusis.  And because of that, I can watch and "listen" for much, much longer times now.

Some may say GREAT!  Other may say, if you can't listen to the TV the way it was designed to do, then you're truly not "habituating" to way it should be.  Maybe, or maybe not.

When  buddy of mine comes over to visit (who does not have hyperacusis) and listens to my "overhauled" TV system, his remarks were that I have "shelved down" much of the mid-range frequencies and mid-highs and it takes way from alot of the "brilliance" of the electronic sound.  When I returned the equalizer setting to his liking as an experiment, OH BOY, a headache started to ensue in my noggin' with a few minutes!  This is, I feel, all due to me still dealing with hyperacusis, and is not a natural aversion to the sound.  Much like you Explorer, I always loved...and still do...love the sound of televisions, movies and recorded music, but have to now curve, shelve and contour the sound to better "fit" the way my brain's auditory system processes normal electronically-induced sound.

I invite you too, to experiment and "explorer" different ways that your own auditory system can now have some semblance of happiness, fulfillment & joy to your listening experience.

Anything I can say or suggest to help you in your journey, please ask.

Bless you Explorer.

--- AnthonyO

SONY Trinitron TV and Analoge Audio Gear.jpg 


0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #6 
It isn't really limited to just electronic sounds for me.  Any sound past a certain volume or duration is bothersome.  The wind outside bothers me when I go for walks, especially if it's blowing past my ears.

I've considered borrowing a pair of half-decent bookshelf speakers from a friend for a long term period of time.  They might be better than the logitech speakers I currently use for my TV.  I can't afford an external equalizer, though.  I can use a software visual equalizer if I'm watching something from my PC, but that wouldn't work if I was watching something using chromecast.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #7 

Explorer, you wrote:

"Now I can't even get through one 30 minute show without worsening my symptoms.  This setback still has not gone away, and this is the longest setback I've had in over 3 years.  And it was caused by much less noise than what I was able to comfortably expose myself to in 2015-2016."

Well, your tolerances are getting less. Do you know what your LDL's are? Do you use pink noise or sound enrichment?

I'm not interested in arguing with you. Aversion is diagnosed and it doesn't mean you have any actual dislike or fear of the sound you're listening to. If you can listen to a sound for a period of time without pain but experience pain or setbacks when you listen longer it means you have aversion to the sound. This happens in the subcortical brain and it is not a conscious dislike. 

Explorer wrote:
"It gets worse over time, not better.   It's not that "sometimes" it gets worse.  It's that it steadily gets worse, despite my best attempts at desensitization."

Time doesn't treat sound sensitivity. Gradual exposure and sound therapy does. 

You probably are not going about desensitization the right way. Given you don't understand aversion, it is most likely you're doing the wrong things.

With exposure desensitization you work at the length of time you can listen to sounds, the number sounds you listen to, and the frequency you listen to them. 

Also learning not to distress over symptoms is really important. You don't want to try to hurt yourself, but if your ears do get hurt just tell yourself it is no big deal. It is really important.

Anyone with aversion to a sounds can make progress with it, but you need to learn how.

Start with sounds you tolerate best. 
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Do you know what your LDL's are? Do you use pink noise or sound enrichment?

I am seeing an audiologist soon to have my LDLs updated.  My last LDL and hearing test was several years ago.

I use pink noise and sound enrichment 24/7.  I've grown so accustomed to sound enrichment that at this point I hate being in a completely silent room. 

Quote:
Aversion is diagnosed and it doesn't mean you have any actual dislike or fear of the sound you're listening to.

See my post earlier where I included an image of the definition of "aversion".  "Aversion" means "a strong dislike of something".

"Aversion to sound" is not a diagnosis that I'm aware of.  I cannot find it included within any medical literature.

Quote:
Time doesn't treat sound sensitivity. Gradual exposure and sound therapy does.

Gradual exposure and sound therapy has not done a whole lot for me.  I continue to work at it as best I can, as I have been for years, and my tolerances continue to stagnate or even deteriorate.

Quote:
You probably are not going about desensitization the right way.

What is the correct way to go about desensitization?  Everything you have explained so far about desensitization are things I already do.

Quote:
With exposure desensitization you work at the length of time you can listen to sounds, the number sounds you listen to, and the frequency you listen to them.

I work at all of those things and have been doing so for years.

Quote:
Also learning not to distress over symptoms is really important. You don't want to try to hurt yourself, but if your ears do get hurt just tell yourself it is no big deal. It is really important.

This is the only area I believe I have made any real improvement on.  Symptoms used to cause significantly more distress for me than they do now.  I am able to tolerate them much better than I used to.  The symptoms themselves, however, have worsened or stayed the same.  I've simply grown more accustomed to enduring them.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #9 
Explorer,

Call it misophonia if you like, it is all the same and involves the limbic and autonomic nervous system. Hazell used the term aversion which is perfectly accurate. You won’t easily find an accurate definition of misophonia when googling it either. But what you’re talking about is an aversive response to a sound.

You don’t have to have actual dislike, in fact when listening less to loud sounds you have aversion to can caused you develop aversion to quieter ones.

Things you can do -

Can you tolerate the car for a period? Try taking a longer drive than your used to. Go out to places you can tolerate and try to spend more time.

If going out means using ear protection then do that starting out. And gradually get ear protection off.

Keep a record of your successes and just try to listen a bit longer to these problem sounds like the TV, every couple weeks or so. Sometimes it would take me month to try to do more.

Don’t expect everything to go smoothly ... and learn that your symptoms associated with these sounds are just limbic and no big deal.

If a sound causes you a lot of problems you want to take desensitization with it very slowly.

This can take years, and takes longer for some than others. So it is important to understand what your doing and keep focused on the end goal.

Your audiologist sound be able to diagnose and explain misophonia, if she is TRT trained. But don’t expect that she will because many just don’t have a good understanding misophonia or exposure desensitization.

You just have to keep trying and put more sound in your world in general. You goal is to change beliefs about these sounds by changing experience. Like I say, it is not about actual conscious dislike ... it is about retraining the subcortical brain (conditioned reflexes).
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Things you can do - Can you tolerate the car for a period? Try taking a longer drive than your used to. Go out to places you can tolerate and try to spend more time. If going out means using ear protection then do that starting out. And gradually get ear protection off. Keep a record of your successes and just try to listen a bit longer to these problem sounds like the TV, every couple weeks or so.

I have been doing all of this for years and my symptoms and tolerances have only stagnated or regressed.  They did improve for a period of 2 years or so (2015-2016), but it's been a steady decline since then.  I think that period of improvement was due to benzodiazepines more than anything.  Now that I'm coming off of them I'm going back to where I was before.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #11 
This can be very difficult. Sometimes you just have to do more regardless of symptoms. I've gone backwards too and not because I didn't try, even after learning about TRT, but because there were some things I didn't understand. Sometimes you just have to do more regardless of symptoms, and I can tell you do that, but that is what Hazell explained to me ... I had to very slowly to more ... this meant facing very loud tinnitus and constant ear pain at times. 

Get your LDLs tested and go from there. 

Can listen to the car without ear protection?

What about music? 

What can you do? 

What keeps you from listening longer to a sound?

Also talk to your audiologist about it. 

Maybe you're trying to force things and trying to take desensitization too fast? This can caused increased aversion to sounds. 
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
This can be very difficult. Sometimes you just have to do more regardless of symptoms. I've gone backwards too and not because I didn't try, even after learning about TRT, but because there were some things I didn't understand. Sometimes you just have to do more regardless of symptoms

Quote:
Maybe you're trying to force things and trying to take desensitization too fast? This can caused increased aversion to sounds. 

How can you know what the threshold for "too fast" is if you have to do things that cause symptoms?

How can I be going "too fast" when I typically only voluntarily expose myself to sounds that don't cause symptoms?  Wouldn't exposing myself to sounds that cause symptoms require going faster than I am now?
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #13 
I don't know what you've been doing ... that's why asked the questions I did. But you didn't answer. Yes if you're plan is to avoid all your symptoms then you will likely go backwards. That is the way it is with misophonia. 

Pick a sound to work on that you can tolerate fine for a period of time. Listen to it every day and then try to listen to listen just a bit longer. If you can listen 30 minutes okay, maybe try just 5 minutes longer. I can't tell you how long, just see how it goes. Even if it is just short period longer it is progress. Then in a week or so later try a bit longer. Doing this should also help with sensitivity to other sounds. 

What about music therapy? You can try with that. Gradually increase the length of time you listen.

Often symptoms do get worse for a period after a longer exposure to a sound and you just have to relax and maybe not listen very long the next few days but do listen for a short period each day, maybe try a ten second exercise explained in TRT exercises paper here:

http://tinnitus.org/downloads/

Then a week or two later listen even longer. That's how retraining works.

I suspect you can do this just fine without hurting yourself. Just take it slow at first and stay positive and gain some confidence. Don't anticipate problems.
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
I don't know what you've been doing

I said that I've been doing most of the things you've suggested that I do.

Quote:
Pick a sound to work on that you can tolerate fine for a period of time. Listen to it every day and then try to listen to listen just a bit longer. If you can listen 30 minutes okay, maybe try just 5 minutes longer. I can't tell you how long, just see how it goes. Even if it is just short period longer it is progress. Then in a week or so later try a bit longer. Doing this should also help with sensitivity to other sounds.

I have been attempting to do this for years.

Quote:
What about music therapy? You can try with that. Gradually increase the length of time you listen.

I have been attempting to do this for years.

Quote:
Often symptoms do get worse for a period after a longer exposure to a sound and you just have to relax and maybe not listen very long the next few days

Yes, this has been happening to me for years and has never stopped happening, and now happens more frequently and more severely than it did before.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #15 
You wrote:
“I finished the show in much discomfort, and now I am in the middle of another full blown setback where my ears are burning, my face is tense, my head feels full of pressure, every sound has a tinny quality to it, and sounds I could handle 2 weeks ago are now painful to listen to.”

This is a common response to listening more to a sound you are phobic or have aversion to. So you just chill for a few days , gradually start listening for again for short periods and then in say 2 weeks or so listen a bit longer.

It gets easier in time.

It sounds like to me you’ve being too careful and haven’t understood how to deal with misophonia.

Anyway, Hazell said to me that the key to getting better was to learn the Jastreboff model so you can give a talk on it. Most people don’t of course, and i’m not criticizing ... it is difficult to deal with.

I don’t believe you can’t get better ... you just need the right help. Overcoming category 4 hyperacusis and misophonia is a real challenge.

TRT is never a smooth process. You’ll have ups and downs and symptoms at times. But you got to keep your eyes on the goal ... slowly doing more. It can be done

I asked if you can listen to your car okay? Or other louder sounds.

0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
So you just chill for a few days , gradually start listening for again for short periods and then in say 2 weeks or so listen a bit longer.

It has been 3 weeks now, and despite my efforts to slowly build back up, my symptoms persist with only minor windows here and there.  The past 3 days were more tolerable, and last night I was able to listen to some music.  Today my symptoms are significantly worse than they were yesterday, especially the symptoms in the right side of my face.  Whether that's because of the music or not, I have no idea.

Quote:
It gets easier in time.

It has only become more difficult over time for me, despite already doing nearly everything you've already suggested for years now.

Quote:
It sounds like to me you’ve being too careful and haven’t understood how to deal with misophonia.

How do you deal with misophonia?  So far everything you've mentioned are things that I already do.  Which part haven't I understood?

Quote:
It can be done I asked if you can listen to your car okay? Or other louder sounds.

I don't have a drivers license, nor could I afford a car even if I did.  I only sit in a car when my family drives me to doctors appointments or stores, which is maybe once a month, and I have to wear hearing protection because it is very loud and exacerbates symptoms significantly.  I can't handle any loud sounds.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #17 
You just have to do more ... that’s it ...

I can’t tell you what to do , it is something you need to figure out. I had to get past fear of my symptoms to move forward. I slowly did more, faced my symptoms and stayed positive. That’s what I did ...

Get LDLs checked and talk to your audiologist. I’m sure you can find your way forward
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
You just have to do more ... that’s it ... I can’t tell you what to do , it is something you need to figure out. I had to get past fear of my symptoms to move forward.  I slowly did more, faced my symptoms and stayed positive.

That's extremely vague and not really helpful.  I've been trying to figure it out for 3 years now and have not really seen any progress.  Things wax and wane, but it's always on a downward trend.

I already do as much as I feel capable of. I slowly expose myself to whatever sounds I can tolerate, including 24/7 pink noise, music, walks.  My TV is on for most of the day at a very low volume.  I turn it up a bit if I'm trying to watch it.  But this hasn't improved my symptoms.  I am still intolerant to all of the above.

I don't fear my symptoms anymore, at least not nearly as much as I used to.  I am much more mentally equipped to deal with noises and the symptoms they cause me, simply because I've adjusted to it over time.  But that doesn't change the symptoms themselves.  The symptoms themselves are as bad as they've ever been, despite my changes in mindset toward them.

I want the symptoms to get better, but they just don't get better.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #19 
It sounds like you've just learned what aversion is, so I wouldn't anticipate you'd understand how to can't get better. My symptoms got worse as I did MORE ... and I did a lot of CBT. The symptoms you complained about I called no big deal because I knew what they were ... and I continued to stay focused on my goal and kept doing more. That's what I did ... 

Sorry if you don't find any of my comments helpful ... I guess you'll have to look elsewhere. 

Do some reading ... 
http://tinnitus.org/downloads/

I'm done, best of luck!
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
It sounds like you've just learned what aversion is

No, I've been aware of the word "aversion" for much of my life.

If you're referring to "misophonia", then no, I learned what it was a long time ago as well.

I have done quite a bit of reading over the years.  I spoke with Myriam Westcott via email recently and she sent me some reading material, wherein I was surprised to see that I was already doing almost everything the reading material suggested I do.  Westcott herself told me that my sound enrichment strategies seemed like they were on the right track.

Yet, here I am, showing no symptomatic improvement.

I'm actually not aware of any study performed about the treatment of people who experience these types of symptoms in relation to sound exposure.  The only studies I'm aware of are about TRT and counselling and their effect on LDLs and hyperacusis.  There doesn't appear to be much science regarding the treatment of misophonia at all.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #21 
symptoms aren't the problem ... the sensitivity is the problem. You treat the sensitivity by gradually doing more, facing you symptoms and thinking good thoughts. As your tolerances to these 'problem' sounds increases your symptoms get less intense gradual. That's been my experience ... 

If you read the information on misophonia in the link I posted then you know that you very gradually listen more to sounds that cause you problems. It's not that complicated but people often make their symptoms the problem and go backwards. 
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
symptoms aren't the problem ... the sensitivity is the problem.

If I didn't experience symptoms, I would not have a sensitivity.  They are one in the same.

Quote:
You treat the sensitivity by gradually doing more, facing you symptoms and thinking good thoughts.

How do I know if I'm "going too fast" if I'm required to face my symptoms?

Quote:
you very gradually listen more to sounds that cause you problems.

So I have to ignore my symptoms and force myself to experience pain?  What is the threshold for "going too fast" if not experiencing symptoms and pain?  

In your first post in this thread you wrote "you don't want to force it".  Now you are saying I have to listen to sounds that cause symptoms.  What is "forcing it" if it isn't listening to sounds that cause symptoms?
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #23 
Just listen at period you know you can tolerate without pain. Listen everyday not going over that limit. If you experience pain stop for that period. Then in a week try to listen a bit longer, maybe try just 10% longer. If it starts to hurt or cause you other problems stop.

Progress usually doesn’t have to hurt , but it may cause other symptoms ... tinnitus may get worse. But early on I did have to face pain at times to do more while getting ear protection off. I can’t advise you to do the same. I believe you can do more if you know how

Talk to your audiologist ...

Good luck

0
Margy

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #24 
Explorer said:

I don't strongly dislike the sounds that caused this setback, so saying I have an "aversion" to them is inaccurate. In fact, I really enjoy these sounds, and the fact that they cause symptoms makes me sad, because it limits my ability to hear more of them. I would love to be able to listen to these sounds all day, because I love these sounds. "Love" is the literal opposite of "aversion".

Thank you, Explorer. This is beautiful. I feel exactly the same way. I love music and being able to enjoy others’ voices. But these things are usually too painful and lead to lasting pain that adds up over time.
0
Margy

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #25 
AnthonyO said:
Thank you for posting the clear definition between "Love" and "Aversion"; indeed those two terms, in plain English, are worlds apart from one another.

I too, many times like you, have had great difficulty listening to the sound coming from television sets, radios, ceiling speakers in supermarkets, outdoor P.A. systems and any electronically induced sound...whether it is amplified little, what could be considered "normal', or loudly.

Thank you, AnthonyO, for remembering my symptoms and others and lifting us up. I’m still doing the same struggle I have been doing for the past three years. Partly it seems to have gotten a little better, but there are still many sounds that others can tune out while I need to go somewhere else
0
Explorer

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnloudb
Just listen at period you know you can tolerate without pain. Listen everyday not going over that limit. If you experience pain stop for that period. Then in a week try to listen a bit longer, maybe try just 10% longer. If it starts to hurt or cause you other problems stop.

I have been doing this already for years and have not improved, only stagnated and regressed.

We have been over this.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.