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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #1 
Greetings!

I'm a former musician (42 year old male) wondering about the recovery level specifics of other musicians. Have any of you been able to return to live play using hearing protection? Only acoustic?  Regretted playing again due to setback? If you made a successful return, how did you know  it was safe to play again? Method of recovery?

I'm going on 3 years with T and 1.5 years with H. My main goal is to be able to mow my lawn again with my second being able to play live music. As of now I can attend restaurants without hearing protection and movies with 20 bd cut plugs with no problems. However, if I try to mow my lawn or play my guitar (low volume) utilizing pugs + muffs I earn a set-back. My setbacks are becoming increasingly shorter...so this is good. A good two months used to associate setbacks whereas now I've recovered in as little as a week. My TTTS has even went from a 10 to a 2!

As I'm no spring chicken I'm wondering if an eventual attempt at a return to music is even worth the possibility of a major setback or worse, permanent situation.  

Anyway, I'd love to hear from you all.

Thanks!
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phacker

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome,

I solved the lawn mowing about three weeks ago, I got a push mower with no motor.  I was surprised how well it cut the lawn.  

I was a sound engineer and got my H from loud speakers, and I have never fully recovered and I going on 5 years with CAT 4 H. If I did recover, I would never go back into that sound environment.  
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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #3 
I made the mistake of mowing my lawn yesterday. I had been feeling a lot better and my ear pain due to H was way better for the past few weeks, so I thought id be fine mowing the lawn. I wore my best foam plugs, and my over the ear muffs as well. I really didn’t think anything would happen as I could barely even hear the mower. But today I’m in the middle of a burning/pain sensitivity H setback. Mild high pitched T is up a bit too. So I know know I can’t mow the lawn even with all the protection. As for going back to performing music. I don’t ever see that happening for me either. I was a trumpet player professionally for years, and was around music my whole life as my father was a conductor. I’m pretty sure that’s what caused my H. I’m actually jealous of my father he just went almost totally deaf, and only needs hearing aids. What a terrible ailment we have that can get so bad I often wish I was just totally deaf. Anyway, good luck.
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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #4 
Phacker and Phillychris1t thanks for the input. What have you guys done to recover...TRT, sound generators? I realize this may be too personal of a question, but how are you dealing emotionally after losing music? At times I'm ok, but for the most part I feel like I'm grieving a passed loved one. I know it sounds strange but I feel like I'm forced to morn the death of .5 of myself. 

I'm thinking of a battery powered mower but see that they are rather noisy as well, at least noisy enough to cause a set-back. Lawn is too large an rough for a reel mower.

What have you guys taken up for a new hobbies? As music satiates so many aspects of the human element I'm finding it hard to replace. Everything I explore hardly proves barely stimulating. 

I miss my friends and making music with others. Music is so much more than the music.

Phillychris1: Man, your father is one lucky man. Like you, give me hearing aids any day opposed to this stuff. I did the same as you. Was feeling like I had really improved and tried to mow the lawn. This stuff is very deceptive and sets you up for failure it seems. 

Have you guys come to sell all your gear? I'm finding it real hard to do so despite having way too much $ invested.....in dust collectors. 


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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #5 
I developed sound sensitivity many years ago where I basically only got a slight fluttery pain if the radio was on too loud, or had too much bass, or I was at a concert, or An unsually loud movie. It’s only gotten really bad in the last year or so. But I was also a DJ for many years as well as a trumpet player and music was a huge part of my life all around, and now I can’t even listen to music in the car. If I do, I keep only the back right speaker on and no bass. So the enjoyment isn’t there anymore. I was an audiophile and always had the best sounding systems and listened to and played music all the time so I feel your pain. And I have the same feeling of loss. And when at social events or bars. I always have in clear musicians earplugs and for some reason I can’t really act myself with them in. Like my senses are dulled just enough to throw off my whole personality. It really is like loosing a part of yourself.

Since mine has only Progressed to where it’s really affecting my life recently now I’ve just started trying to recover. But I’ve been using YouTube videos. Cranial Massages, I have a pink noise generator, and I take magnesium, NAC, and some other supplements that seem to help. Also I find that icing my ear at night helps me sleep. Mine is concentrated in my left ear. My right can act up, but no where near what I go thru with my left ear. I think if both of my ears were like my left, I would have lost it a while ago. Lol... funny but sad... for the most part I’ve been working I. It my self and I’ve seen a few doctors, but I’ve found if I’m careful, it gets a lot better, I just have to learn to be more vigilant. Complacency when I’m feeling good is what gets me.


How about you?
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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #6 
Pink noise, torque release chiropractic and have become a very clean eater. I honestly don't know if the aforementioned have helped or my progress is a result of the natural healing process. I may try auriculotherapy here soon, but part of me thinks to myself, "what for." Maybe our brains are simply permanently damaged. I live in MN and we have rather well known audiology group her in Edina dealing with T, H and TRT. I live about 20 minutes from them and will be making a visiting in a few months when my insurance kicks in. 

The toughest part of this is the not knowing part. Meaning, if I could be told, "nope, you'll never participate with music again," I think it would be easier to move on. But then I read of people recovering which provides some hope. Then again, these folks typically experience recovery in under a year. 

I look back to when I just had T (which I'm so over) thinking it was the pits. Man, those were the day.

Oddly, my setbacks have no impact on my T thus far. My TTTS used to be imputed as well but not as of late. I want to think this is progress, but I'm finding nothing makes sense in the world of T and H.

I hear you on the impact plugs can have on your personality in social situations. It's so interesting. When I used IEM it never even came close to having the same effect. 

It's all just so gross. 
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phacker

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Reply with quote  #7 
I did a year of TRT with no improvement.  The TRT just irritated my ears.  It was a daily grind and I had many set backs during the process.  It took me a year to just get to using the sound generators 5 hours a day, but there was no improvement with other sounds. I went back to the sound generators twice for about 6 weeks each time, but gave up again.  I am fine with no music.  The hardest part for me is the isolation and not having a normal life.  When I am around people, I need to wear the ear plugs and I have a hard time having a conversation.  
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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm sorry the TRT did not work for you. Although soothing, pink noise really doesn't have an impact on my situation..maybe I'm too impatient. Did you attend the associated counseling sessions? Worthwhile? 

BTW: I think I'm going to bite the bullet and get a used reel mower and mow a little bit each day. I can't afford a lawn service and the family members insisting to help me out are MIA....Ha!
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phacker

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yes, I did attend 3 months of associated counseling as part of the TRT program.  The bottom line of the counseling was I needed to learn to live with T and H as I was not making any progress with the sound generators after a year's use. I would recommend the TRT and counseling to anyone with H and T as it does work for some people, but there is a percentage of people that do not make any improvement.   


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cactus

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Reply with quote  #10 

Hyperacusis and other auditory symptoms are quite common among musicians, and many recover and return to playing. Of course you have to be more careful with your hearing (by wearing properly fitted hearing protection and letting your ears rest from time to time), but don't think too quickly that you should just 'give up and learn to live with it'. This mentality only makes symptoms worse as it makes you anxious and increases avoidance behavior. 

I can understand that you can get very demotivated by your symptoms. When that happens to me, I always read and reflect on the many success stories that I know, from people on this forum but also from musicians that I admire and of which I know that they have struggled with these issues as well. If they can do it and continue to tour and play and make millions with their music, then surely I can be active with music in my life as well.

Of course, if you really are considering if you could ever get back into music at a high professional level this might be another matter, as this can be very demanding on your ears even if you have normal hearing. But life is not just black and white, you will find a way to make music with maybe a few adjustments until you recover more.

It's promising that some of your symptoms have already recovered. I hope you find a knowledgeable specialist to help you. In my experience a lot of so called 'specialists' know very little and offer very little help (sometimes even exploiting the situation), so like many people here you might have to do the majority of it yourself. 

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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hey Stubbyj,

You might find some real encouragement and similarities in reading the success stories of musicians who have recovered and gotten back into music. Check out some of the success stories on this site: Rob, Andrew and Minor. I believe they are all musicians or deeply involved with music as a profession. And they all recovered! Heck, even Neil Young suffered a nasty bout of hyperacusis after touring with Sonic Youth in the 90s. He had to retreat to his Cali ranch for a period of time to recover. Guess what he wrote while there? Harvest Moon.

You may read on certain sites or certain discussions that hyperacusis is “easy to treat”. No so for many of us, especially those of us with ear pain, or Category 4, or whatever you want to call it. Hyperacusis can take a while to resolve, years even, but it can resolve. It takes a heck of a lot of patience and resilience to get through it, but it is possible. Try not to set timelines for yourself. Find ways to continually and gently desensitize your ears. Don’t give up on music.

Best,
EDogg
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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #12 
Cactus and Edogg

Thanks so much for the reply(s) and vote of confidence. This stuff is so confusing and stressful; like riding an emotional roller coaster. After every setback I think there's no possible way I can recover but then the recover time is a little less provided hope. Recovery happens, time passes making me feel comfortable until the next "test.".....time for another "loop." 

Again, thanks and take care!

Stubby
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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #13 
HI there

I just typed a big long reply but something happened and it disappeared or crashed! Heading out now, but I just want to say, it IS possible, others have done it. I know of two and here is another

https://www.chrissingletonmusic.com/faqs/

I am back playing music now having at one point not been able for very quiet spoken voice, and having been housebound for 5 months from h. I agree with Chis above - my recovery was when I stopped weearing ear protection oin normal daily life.

My audiologist who is very well respected in her profession said to me to presume I am going back to amplified gigging etc and was talking about what ear protection to use for that - as all musicians shoudl at amplified gigs.


My recovery was through gradual sound exposure - at one point I couldn’t take quiet speech and now it is totally normal because I hear it everyday so I apply this logic to all sounds and consciously expose myself to radio, traffic, music in the car etc as much as I can, (building it up from very quiet) so that it all becomes normal , which it has. I played in a very loud 20 person miced pub session the other day and was fine.

Started with singing on my own again, then acoustic instruments on my own, then playing acoustically with 2 friends and then the bigger session after that.

That’s all for now !

If others can do it, it is possible and you can do it. That is my view and the two very well respected audiologists I’ve seen think the same and both have dealt with thousands and thousands of people

I wish you well

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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #14 
Sorry about the typos! Typing really fast!!
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Stubbyj

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Reply with quote  #15 
Naomi

Thanks for your input and congratulations on your return to music. I'm really starting to think that not plugging in everyday situations is the they key and in my case even pushing it a little has proven beneficial. After my last setback I decided not to retreat to silence but to move ahead as mentioned and I know I made progress in doing so. 

This stuff (T and H) is so confusing. 

Take care!

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makarakam

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Reply with quote  #16 
I have H for 4 years now, when it began it was impossible for me even to speak since my voice was too loud. I used to gig regularly with a very loud hard rock band. Now I'm back to playing acoustic bass at the unplugged version of the band, and also I can do the full band rehearsals with ear plugs, but we do keep it at a lower volume because of my condition. I have no courage to try the full live show as of yet. 
The lawn mover problem had an easy and even fun solution, which is keeping me exercised and is almost meditative in its use:
https://www.bauhaus.hr/sklopiva-kosa-60-cm.html
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cactus

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Reply with quote  #17 

It's good to see so many people saying their hyperacusis improved! It is indeed such a slow process, often taking months or even years. I see to have done quite well after (only) a year and really hope my progress will not stagnate. 

Naomi how long did it take for you?

So far I've heard recovery stories of 9 months, 1 years, 1.5 year, 2 years, 2.5 years, and even 4 or 5 years before (full) recovery. 

Reminds me of the quote: "If you can't fly, then run. If you can't run, then walk. If you can't walk, then crawl. but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward."

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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #18 
I agree the success stories help so much. I’ve been car shopping lately, and am basing my whole search on what cars are quietest. And even with some of the quietest cars on the road. I still need a plug in my left ear to not wince in pain. It’s such a hard thing to deal with. And my wife is very supportive but has mentioned that on car rides we don’t really talk much since my H started to get bad, and I can’t have the radio on either as my Jeep is a very loud car and for the radio to be on and audible it has to be fairly loud. So it’s really boring for us both. So we are trying to find a new car. This issue affects so much if my life it’s a real PTA. I’ve also not been able to drive long at all with the top off the Jeep. Even with plugs the buffeting wind causes a setback for a few days. It’s not worth it.

Luckily I have an appointment today with a New specialist that I’ve been waiting forever to see. I’m hoping she’s more knowledgeable than the last audiologist/Doctor I’ll keep you guys posted. Good luck to all.
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Steve2017

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Reply with quote  #19 
Can I ask Chris, did your H sneak up on you like it did with me probably over 5+ years ago I expect, or did something happen, one moment when something happened to bring H on?
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s simpson
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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #20 
Mine snuck up on me. I can remember years ago having mild pain here and there from movies or a loud sound. But it was very minor and didn’t really bother me. It slowly progressed and got worse over time and then one day, the pain never went away. I was always around loud sounds and music so for me I think it was an accumulation of loud sounds, rather than a single event.
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #21 
Phillychris-

Hope your specialist appointment is helpful. Please keep us posted.

Funny thing, you mention car shopping. I endured this arduous process during the first few months after developing severe H. It’s amazing how so many salespeople want to crank the stereo or yack in your ear the whole test drive. I just told them at the get go- if you want the sale, please be quiet, I have sensitive hearing. It worked pretty well. I ended up getting a new Honda CRV. It is very well sound insulated and pretty comfortable. The engine is not too loud. You could always try electric too, but the high pitched electrical whine my Prius made would bother my ears, so maybe not. Best of luck!

EDogg
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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #22 
Hey all,


Really interesting to read everyone’s experience.

I got h symptoms in late Sep 2017. Sometime over Winter it became really bad, problems with conversation etc so if that was 100%, I’m now about 5%. So I guess 5 or 6 months it took.

The main problem was tinnitus - because of the extra sensitivity it was flaring it up madly and it scared me so I was retreating from sound more and more and creating a vicious circle. It was a bad time.

I worked with a CBT counselor on sound exposure. The premise was, are you willing to experience some discomfort (risk of making tinnitus slightly worse/temporarily worse) in the service of increasing your quality of life/getting your life back ( I was housebound). So each day, very slowly, incrementally I was braving a little more sound, starting with things like water in the tap, the fridge in the kitchen, leaving a window open a little.

My CBT coiunselor basically got me to write out the 10 sounds I found difficult and I worked up tolerance in each one, one by one, working for More than 2 weeks I think on each - like an extra few seconds each day, starting with 5 seconds etc. Very gentle, very incremental.

Eventually it got to the stage when it was impractical to do them individually and I just got braver about exposing myself to as much sound as I felt intuitively I was able for that day, and pushing myself to brave a little more than I was comfortable with sometimes.

My breakthrough was sitting through a long, pretty noisy storm one night, I was in the kitchen. I think the sustained sound of it over hours really helped desensitise me, even though I was scared the whole time of how it would affect the tinnitus.

The other breakthrough was talking to a very amazing psychiatrist who deals with ear problems/works supporting people with hearing loss and people with tinnitus. She herself is profoundly deaf and has an implant hearing aid. She’s one of the most amazing human beings I ever met. She said while we were talking, that It’s like going into the water if it’s cold or whatever - to just jump in has it’s risks but to go really really slowly has risks too. Neither is without risk.
This made me reconsider my very careful, very slow approach. It was a timing thing - I was also at a stage where I was able to do more. A day or two after she said that I spontaneously grabbed my trainers one day and went outside for the first time in 5 months, for 10 mins and I built it up from there. Shortly after that I went to try turning on my car, with a view to building up resistance by first sitting in it wth the engine on, with ear muffs if needed, and slowly build it up to being able for driving. I got there pretty fast considering where I was a few months previously. I was able to build up the tolerance over a couple of weeks and have no problem no with my car.

I did think I would have to get a quiet vacuum cleaner, car, etc but I built up tolerance and am okay with them all now, although I don’t love vacuuming. I totally stopped using earplugs, as I think that was what caused my h in the first place.

Hope that is of use to people. It’s a longer post than I planned but the more we share the more we can help each other possibly?

I recognise that everyone is differenct and that it works differently for everyone. Hope it’s of some use.

Whoever is reading this, others have been through it. You’re not alone and you can get through it. Have hope.

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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #23 
Also — get all the help you can would be my other advice. I literally wrote off to every available service anywhere near me. I was blessed to find a tinnitus group that operates out of the local deaf association. It’s a charity providing free help. THey did a house visit and through them I accesesed an audiologist and was visited by the psychiatrist I mentioned etc.

My GP was really helpful too. I didn’t have huge financial resources but it is worth the search and emailing any possible sources of help that you can I think of. You never know what will come back from that, was my experience. It was only through emailing a hearing service miles away from me that I learned about the one in my own city.

Just saying that to people in general really, rather than in response to specific questions in this thread but I hope it helps.
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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #24 
Tell me About it Edogg, and I also had a salesman try to tell me how good the bose radio was and I had to basically block his hand like a ninja when he went for the volume. Then I had to explain about my stupid ears. And also while car shopping over the weekend it was 95 degrees and I went on 3 different test drives with salesmen and kept the ac off and windows up. It was like 120 in the car. And the salesmen were dying, I felt so bad. But it is what it is.

And Naomi, thanks for the helpful tips, and I’m so glad your down to a 5%. That so encouraging. I have been seeking help and have seen several doctors, but yester was the most promising. The doc was very knowledgeable and actually knew all about my specific type of H, where the high pain associated with any type of loud low frequency sound or deep vibration causes sever pain, and that in turn causes the T for a few days while I’m healing. But I have a very short recovery time, and that’s a good thing she said. And it’s due mainly to this board that I’ve been trying my best to live my life and while I do not go anywhere without plugs. I always remind myself that I do heal, And every time I get set off, it’s only for a few days and then I tend to get back to normal fairly quickly. It’s amazing to me that I don’t think I’ve had a pain free day in about a year, but I’ve grown accustomed to living life with constant inner ear pain and things have been getting better for th most part,

Anyway, as for the visit, I’m finally getting an MRI next week as per her reccomendation, and she also referred me to a CBT counselor, and seems optimistic that as long as there isn’t a more serious underlying problem causing this, I should be able to get better. She was the most positive doctor I’ve seen and full of hope. One thing that I have going for me is that I’ve always been able to mentally reduce my T when it flares up, and can also focus on it and have it get unbelievably loud if I want to, and apparently that is a really good thing as I have a good starting point. She said some have a really hard time mentally adjusting the T volume so to speak. What a weird ailment we are all cursed with.

Sorry for the long post, but it really has been helping me discusssing this situation with people on this board. I’m not really one to talk about my problems but it definitely helps.
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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #25 
So, so sorry PhillyChris to hear about your constant pain. I hope that you will continue to heal and have less and less of it.

Did the doctor ever mention looking at using amitriptyline or something similar for that? I don't honestly know if it works for that, but my doctor tried it for over-sensitivity I was having to mad stuff like electricity cables, screens, tiny amounts of caffeine. It's prescribed for neural pain from back injuries and things like that, but he tried a small dose to try to help the over sensitivities I got with the h. I never had bad ear pain, just some when it was acute, but it did disappear when I took the amitriptyline . Still taking it every nite, it helps to make you sleepy also so it's doing two jobs for me.
Plan is to stop when things stabilise and improve further down the line.

Sounds like you have a good supportive doctor anyway, it is brilliant you found them. Doesn't it make just such a profoundly big difference to have positive help that you trust?

I don't know when or if it will become a possibility for you because of the pain you are dealing with, but I must say that the progress I made once I was able to put away the ear plugs was huge.
Are u trying any really, really low level incremental exposure to the sounds that are causing the pain? Like, so quiet at the start that you barely hear them? Or working down in frequency from sound you are comfortable with slowly towards the lower sounds etc?

I am uncomfortable asking that to be honest as I know what it's like fielding 'well meaning' advice from ppl who aren't living what you are living! But I decided to risk annoying u with the questions for the sake of any possible help it might be. So please forgive me if it's intrusive of me to ask.

Very best wishes to all reading this
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #26 
Hi Naomi,

Thank you for returning here and sharing your success story in detail. Perhaps, if you feel comfortable, you could have it posted on the “success stories” portion of the Hyperacusis Network. It means the world to have someone, who has been through it, to return and share their encouragement and tips with those of us who are really struggling. From the bottom of my heart, thank you!

I second the consideration for trying Amitriptyline. I also have severe H with ear pain, yet mine is from higher frequency sounds typically. It used to be near daily. Now it’s a week on a week off, so not gone but improved. I noticed improvement in pain symptoms (and anxiety and SLEEP) after starting Amitriptyline. I take a very low dose of 37.5 mg every night before bed. I also take lyrica, which helps as well. When I have a bad flare of
Ear pain, I’ll take an extra lyrica and it calms it down. Both are worthy of consideration.

EDogg
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Naomi

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Reply with quote  #27 
Hi EDogg 

I'm so sorry to hear you are suffering. I know it seems like it is endless, but it can turn around faster than you ever expect - that is my experience. And then you leave that darkness behind.

Actually my doctor prescribed Lustral (Seraltrine?) low dose as well and that really supported me in letting go I think, enough to be able to do the sound exposure and to be brave enough to drive to the sea when I started driving again, so that has been life changing for me also.

Once things improve, you never look back and you appreciate things like the freedom to just go places and be with people so much more, I have found, so that has been a blessing. 
In a very unexpected way, having to change from doing a lot of headphones/computer based music work has also been a blessing too, as I have more music and time with other people now and I am happier because of that. So, even though it's impossible to believe good can come of such bad, it can. Good things can come.

I will definitely post it in success stories, it's a great idea, thank you. They were they only things keeping me going at one point, for a good bit of time. It is truly an ordeal to experience h and it seems for many people, you feel like the only human to have ever been in that weird, scary situation, for some reason, which makes it tougher. 

It's great to see you saying that about Amitriptyline, as really I wasn't totally sure if it's a done thing or what, so it's great to see reaffirmation of it - means that is something that can definitely help others.

Strength, hope and healing to all reading 


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gvkk

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Reply with quote  #28 
I made a post in another thread, need help, am a music teacher. 

People do not believe me! The doctor thinks I'm schizophrenic, said only a schizophrenic would say what I do about noise and he's an ENT!

I wrote a long post in that other thread, stayed up late, need sleep. Seems to get worse when I don't sleep. I have tinnitus and hyperacusis. I was a nurse for 26 years and before I got this problem, I had no idea, not even a clue that it could be like this but for me when it's really bad I can't even stand to hear normal sounds and something like a fork dropping on the floor is horrible! 

But then too - I have other physical problems, and I outlined some of them in another post. I remember though that with migraine headaches, the sounds to noises are something that I can feel, same with this hyperacusis. I have PTSD and allergies, a long time ago neck injury and I'm 72. The allergies and sore throat seem to trigger it. Stress triggers it, work as a musician is unbearable.

Any common denominators that you folks notice?

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gvkk
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Phillychris1

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Reply with quote  #29 
Gvkk, I totally understand about the doctors not understanding or even believing how bad the symptoms can be. Took me 6 months if dowcotrs to find Rainer relief. I’ve been to 2 ENTs, an 2 audiologist, and my GP. No one in the Philly area seems to have much experience with H.

So far, The only thing that has helped me is Klonopin at bed time for sleep and stress, about an hour after Klonopin the pain and H seems to disappear and while it’s being held at bay my wife gives me cranial massages, when I wake up the next day I feel totally normal. For the first few hours of the day. Unfortunately the H comes back by nighttime. But it does seems to be getting slowly better with this routine. And I know it’s just masking the symptoms, but the few hours where it’s gone is like heaven for me. I can watch tv and talk to my wife in bed, etc.

Stress and allergies definitely trigger it for me, and I also know what you mean by feeling things rather than hearing them, low vibrations or low boom sounds like a car door slamming seem to reverberated right down into my middle ear and Cause much not pain than loud sounds. Even with plugs and earmuffs in these vibrations can set me off something fierce.


While I don’t recommend anyone taking klonopin as it’s a narcotic. It has really helped me tremendously in the short term. Like I said the hours of relief seem to heal me both physically and mentally.

Good luck!!!

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gvkk

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Reply with quote  #30 
Thanks Phillychris,
I'm going to the doctor this afternoon. I already take Klonapin. Developed quite a wine habit over the PTSD, and have to be very careful what I do and when because I also take Ambein, I am a serious insomniac. 

I need to go back to work, I know I'm old at age 72, but I'm still able to teach and I have a few students, most of them on vacation right now. I need to advertise but I cringe when I'm near a piano.

Today, I've been outside almost all day and the outside helps in the summertime, the gentle nature sounds I think. Tried pink noise and I hate it, but maybe there's other pink sounds?

I am glad that you find some relief with Klonapin, but you know the doctors are terrified to prescribe that stuff and if one of us died because we took Klonapin and some doctor got into trouble with it, then none of us would get any for the rest of our lives!

Without my medicine and occasional wine, I'm not sure what would be happening in my head right now, I hate the sound problems!

Thanks for writing!!! I'll report back.

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gvkk

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Doctor actually listened to me today!

They're going to start prednisone - a trial, thinking that if it works they'll give me maintenance doses. Also, at the end of the initial prednisone, I am to start Amitriptyline, it works with nerve/headaches. But, he said their drug of choice would be Cymbalta and I think I had it with some side effects a couple of years back.

I think sleep is very important, seems to be one big thing for me, I have insomnia and when I don't get enough good sleep the Hyperacusis and tinnitus gets worse plus those lightening flashes in my eyes that they call silent migraines. 

Thanks for helping me out!



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