The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Animagus11

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi everyone, I was diagnosed with mild (higher frequencies only) hyperacusis earlier this month after having experienced complications with sound sensitivity over the last two years or so, beginning in my first year of university and especially after I started working at a dog daycare. The symptoms were manageable until I started struggling to understand anything being said to me because I spent so much of my energy on bracing myself through the sounds of dogs constantly barking or people talking. Coming back to the world after quarantine was the last straw, and I feel my tolerance to sound becoming more limited every day- any background noise immediately drowns out "important" sounds, and a trip to the barber with all the clipper and dryer noises make my head pound and my ears ring. I am currently waiting for insurance to confirm TRT/"hearing aids" are on our list of covered expenses, but I am still really worried about returning to work, with or without a sound generator. I'm told I will be back on shift in the next couple weeks, but I don't know what I'm going to do about the sound exposure. I know excessive hearing protection makes things worse over time, but I don't think I can take TRT and all that barking at the same time, let alone individually. The headaches that come afterwards are crippling. Quitting my job and finding somewhere quieter is not an option, and I'm moving to the UK after this upcoming academic year, so there doesn't seem to be much point in trying to find a new job in such a short time frame relative to the rate of unemployment.

Does anybody have any strategies for dealing with the noise at work without making their H worse in the process? Is that even a thing? Obviously I'll ask my audiologist about it next time I see her, but that could be a ways off yet while I wait for insurance to get back to me. TIA [personals_heart]
0
beth61

Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi. 

I wish I had some really great tips for you.  I don't know if this is possible for you, or will help, but what I am able to do on my job, is escape the overwhelming loudness for 10-15 minutes intermittently by going to the bathroom, where it's more quiet.  There are only 1 or 2 other smaller spaces I can escape to in my building.  (I work in Hospitality, in a loud building, in a downtown location).  This way, I get a slight break from the continual droning I have to endure outside the building, which is now surrounded with construction, in addition to heavy traffic conditions.

Is that possible on your job - ?  Could you even sit in your car every so often, or ?

It seems that each person's Hyperacusis is unique to that person, and what helps one person, may not help the next.  For me, continuous droning of machines and traffic, air conditioning units, even my refrigerator, if I don't get a break, I literally feel like murdering someone.  It is SO stressful.  If I can find a small, enclosed room (a closet works!!) to sit in for as long as I can, offers some respite.  Luckily I can find some peace in my apt. building basement.  But even then, the sound of running water / toilet can irritate the crap out of me.  

__________________
Beth
0
Animagus11

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Beth,

I try to go to the quietest possible spot that I can find when I have my breaks (15 and 30 minutes respectively per 8 hour shift) but the daycare is basically a big concrete box because dogs wreck everything lol so the sound bounces all over the place and that makes it challenging to get away from it. Of course we also face a major road and I park right beside it too, so generally my best bet is the grooming studio and the bathroom which are both enclosed spaces. It definitely helps, but it's still not the greatest. Bathroom breaks need to be kept to a reasonable minimum just because it's tough to manage 30-40 dogs in a room by yourself and we usually have two people to a room. 

Fortunately my H isn't so bad that quieter droning noises become an issue (though the furnace/forced air in my house really gets to me on extra sensitive days) so going home and having a rest helps a lot, but it sucks coming home after 5 hours of uni and 5-8 hours of work feeling completely overloaded and ready to flop, but still having schoolwork to do. I will definitely talk to my boss about maybe having even an extra 10 minutes I can space out throughout the day where I can step out and breathe. I'll try anything at this point just to have enough energy to meet my obligations. The pain sucks, but I take comfort in knowing this is my last year here and I can look for a quieter job when I move.
0
Margy

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #4 
I would get some noise-canceling headphones. They won’t remove the barks, but they will deaden them somewhat. Try one out and see if it could work.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.