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ybbest

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi All
I'd like to thanks for the useful information. It help me to see the light through this ordeal. Comparing to a lot of people in this forum , I consider myself lucky. I only have a mild hyperacusis in my left ear only. However , the pain still make me suffered a lot both physically and psychologically.At some stage, I will so terrible that I do not know what to do. Until I read the stories on hyperacusis.net and the story  from American Tinnitus Association. You have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.

I now wean off ear plugs and ordered my pink noise flash drive. Now I feel much better now.  I do not feel constant ear fullness. I only feel itchy when hearing loud sound. 

Here is my story 

I have had an acoustic shock 1.5 years ago from a business seminar . Over the last 1.5 years , my left ear suffer from reduced ear pain , ear fullness and reduced sound tolerance.It did get better over time but upon hearing some loud sound , the symptoms return a couple of times.

Later in 2018 , it is getting worse again. I think the main reason for this is I overprotect my ears with ear protection in normal sound level environment. 
I also develop tinnitus in my left ear, although it is very mild , I can only hear at night. I think I think it is because I put myself in a completely silent environment 
  
Here are steps I took to get better

Follow instructions  from Adam' videos on youtube.

Instructions from my audiologist:
1. Don’t wear hearing protection (earplugs) in regular listening environments (i.e. those where volume level stays below 85 dB), even if being in those environments causes discomfort.
2. Avoid completely silent environments for long periods; instead, listen to white or pink noise—either through speakers or a white noise masker machine.
3. Just because you have hyperacusis, your ears are no more susceptible to damage from sound exposure than those of someone who does not have hyperacusis! - THIS IS CRUCIAL!
Instructions from rehab psychologist:
1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
2. Modify your lifestyle in order to get back to the things you did before you got hyperacusis. Ex. finding ways around doing certain things such as listening to music at a low volume, exercising outside or from home, going to restaurants during non-busy times, being seated in quieter areas, and educating loved ones about your condition
3. Stop researching and spending all your time browsing through hyperacusis forums and support groups. There is a lot of incorrect information floating around and the majority of the information is negative. Remember that the population of hyperacusis sufferers online only represent a small population of all the everyone who has hyperacusis/had hyperacusis and recovered.

Here is what I will do when I feel negative about my condition

1. Read the success story in hyperacusis.net
2. Read Rob's message in this forum
3. Watch the success story on youtube


4. I also like the story from American Tinnitus Association, you have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.
My Choice: A Concert Pianist’s Personal Story
https://www.ata.org/sites/default/files/my_choice_concert_pianist_personal_story_tobey_june_06.pdf
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tonyccc

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #2 
Well done.More stories like that please.

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ybbest

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks. Hope you will have speedy recovery.
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contrast

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Posts: 18
Reply with quote  #4 
> 1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
------------------------------------


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm.  We need to keep an open mind about different types of hyperacusis and why some people get better and others don't.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/joycecohen/noise-kills-when-everyday-sound-becomes-torture

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Aplomado

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Posts: 618
Reply with quote  #5 

Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm. 


Sometimes painful noise causes damage, and sometimes it doesn't.

I've experienced pain from a rustling plastic bag that was so bad it made me cry.

A rustling plastic bag does not cause ear damage.  It hurt because my ears were horribly sensitized.  They are aren't nearly that sensitive any more.

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