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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi All
I'd like to thanks for the useful information. It help me to see the light through this ordeal. Comparing to a lot of people in this forum , I consider myself lucky. I only have a mild hyperacusis in my left ear only. However , the pain still make me suffered a lot both physically and psychologically.At some stage, I will so terrible that I do not know what to do. Until I read the stories on hyperacusis.net and the story  from American Tinnitus Association. You have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.

I now wean off ear plugs and ordered my pink noise flash drive. Now I feel much better now.  I do not feel constant ear fullness. I only feel itchy when hearing loud sound. 

Here is my story 

I have had an acoustic shock 1.5 years ago from a business seminar . Over the last 1.5 years , my left ear suffer from reduced ear pain , ear fullness and reduced sound tolerance.It did get better over time but upon hearing some loud sound , the symptoms return a couple of times.

Later in 2018 , it is getting worse again. I think the main reason for this is I overprotect my ears with ear protection in normal sound level environment. 
I also develop tinnitus in my left ear, although it is very mild , I can only hear at night. I think I think it is because I put myself in a completely silent environment 
  
Here are steps I took to get better

Follow instructions  from Adam' videos on youtube.

Instructions from my audiologist:
1. Don’t wear hearing protection (earplugs) in regular listening environments (i.e. those where volume level stays below 85 dB), even if being in those environments causes discomfort.
2. Avoid completely silent environments for long periods; instead, listen to white or pink noise—either through speakers or a white noise masker machine.
3. Just because you have hyperacusis, your ears are no more susceptible to damage from sound exposure than those of someone who does not have hyperacusis! - THIS IS CRUCIAL!
Instructions from rehab psychologist:
1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
2. Modify your lifestyle in order to get back to the things you did before you got hyperacusis. Ex. finding ways around doing certain things such as listening to music at a low volume, exercising outside or from home, going to restaurants during non-busy times, being seated in quieter areas, and educating loved ones about your condition
3. Stop researching and spending all your time browsing through hyperacusis forums and support groups. There is a lot of incorrect information floating around and the majority of the information is negative. Remember that the population of hyperacusis sufferers online only represent a small population of all the everyone who has hyperacusis/had hyperacusis and recovered.

Here is what I will do when I feel negative about my condition

1. Read the success story in hyperacusis.net
2. Read Rob's message in this forum
3. Watch the success story on youtube


4. I also like the story from American Tinnitus Association, you have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.
My Choice: A Concert Pianist’s Personal Story
https://www.ata.org/sites/default/files/my_choice_concert_pianist_personal_story_tobey_june_06.pdf
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tonyccc

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Reply with quote  #2 
Well done.More stories like that please.

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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks. Hope you will have speedy recovery.
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contrast

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Reply with quote  #4 
> 1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
------------------------------------


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm.  We need to keep an open mind about different types of hyperacusis and why some people get better and others don't.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/joycecohen/noise-kills-when-everyday-sound-becomes-torture

25890890235.png 


__________________
cure noxacusis
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #5 

Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm. 


Sometimes painful noise causes damage, and sometimes it doesn't.

I've experienced pain from a rustling plastic bag that was so bad it made me cry.

A rustling plastic bag does not cause ear damage.  It hurt because my ears were horribly sensitized.  They are aren't nearly that sensitive any more.

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web

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #6 
>Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm.  We need to keep an open mind about different types of hyperacusis and why some people get better and others don't.

It is more logical to posit that an otherwise safe noise causing someone with hyperacusis pain is due to increased sensitivity and is not actually harming the person's ears. I would argue that habitually avoiding such noises is more dangerous than experiencing them, as avoidance seems to send one further and further down the hypersensitivity spiral. 

HOWEVER, being exposed to a genuinely dangerous noise >85db is likely the very worst thing you could do. Which is what makes hyperacusis so difficult to treat. We are constantly balancing between overprotection/increased sensitivity and leaving ourselves vulnerable to genuine injury and setbacks. I'd guess that the people who end up living indoors all day for a decade either experienced successive, genuine noise injuries over and over, or else drastically overprotected their ears for way too long. Or maybe some combination of the two.

There is also the psychological component. Some have suggested that worrying about noise damage causes the brain to release chemicals that essentially keep you in a permanent state of hyperacusis. And that 'knowing' that you are not actually harming your ears is the first step to recovery. Lots of accounts online support this theory.

I have had hyperacusis for at least 2 years and didn't even know it because I never changed my behavior or noise consumption patterns. I basically ignored it and it got better. However I suffered a severe noise injury this year and it got much worse! When I figured out that my sensitivity to loudness was due to hyperacusis I started plugging my ears nonstop and immediately began spiraling out of control within days. Now I know not to overprotect my ears. I'm lucky... I have moderate H but not severe. I can probably recover in a year with a bit of luck and discipline.

And yet that also means I have to risk a genuine noise injury. An alarm could go off right now and I'd be screwed perhaps for months or even years. The people who recover seem to have luck in that they don't get hit with any noise injuries. For me, all I can do is control my environment, remember to not overuse ear protection, and always have that protection wherever I go just in case I foresee a potential noise injury.
0
M

Registered:
Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest
Hi All
I'd like to thanks for the useful information. It help me to see the light through this ordeal. Comparing to a lot of people in this forum , I consider myself lucky. I only have a mild hyperacusis in my left ear only. However , the pain still make me suffered a lot both physically and psychologically.At some stage, I will so terrible that I do not know what to do. Until I read the stories on hyperacusis.net and the story  from American Tinnitus Association. You have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.

I now wean off ear plugs and ordered my pink noise flash drive. Now I feel much better now.  I do not feel constant ear fullness. I only feel itchy when hearing loud sound. 

Here is my story 

I have had an acoustic shock 1.5 years ago from a business seminar . Over the last 1.5 years , my left ear suffer from reduced ear pain , ear fullness and reduced sound tolerance.It did get better over time but upon hearing some loud sound , the symptoms return a couple of times.

Later in 2018 , it is getting worse again. I think the main reason for this is I overprotect my ears with ear protection in normal sound level environment. 
I also develop tinnitus in my left ear, although it is very mild , I can only hear at night. I think I think it is because I put myself in a completely silent environment 
  
Here are steps I took to get better

Follow instructions  from Adam' videos on youtube.

Instructions from my audiologist:
1. Don’t wear hearing protection (earplugs) in regular listening environments (i.e. those where volume level stays below 85 dB), even if being in those environments causes discomfort.
2. Avoid completely silent environments for long periods; instead, listen to white or pink noise—either through speakers or a white noise masker machine.
3. Just because you have hyperacusis, your ears are no more susceptible to damage from sound exposure than those of someone who does not have hyperacusis! - THIS IS CRUCIAL!
Instructions from rehab psychologist:
1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
2. Modify your lifestyle in order to get back to the things you did before you got hyperacusis. Ex. finding ways around doing certain things such as listening to music at a low volume, exercising outside or from home, going to restaurants during non-busy times, being seated in quieter areas, and educating loved ones about your condition
3. Stop researching and spending all your time browsing through hyperacusis forums and support groups. There is a lot of incorrect information floating around and the majority of the information is negative. Remember that the population of hyperacusis sufferers online only represent a small population of all the everyone who has hyperacusis/had hyperacusis and recovered.

Here is what I will do when I feel negative about my condition

1. Read the success story in hyperacusis.net
2. Read Rob's message in this forum
3. Watch the success story on youtube


4. I also like the story from American Tinnitus Association, you have a choice, to fight to live a normal life or suffer for the rest of life. I choose to live a normal life.
My Choice: A Concert Pianist’s Personal Story
https://www.ata.org/sites/default/files/my_choice_concert_pianist_personal_story_tobey_june_06.pdf


I also had an acoustic shock 1,5 years ago. How is it with the fullness ?
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #8 
it is all gone after 2 months pink noise therapy.
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast
> 1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
------------------------------------


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm.  We need to keep an open mind about different types of hyperacusis and why some people get better and others don't.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/joycecohen/noise-kills-when-everyday-sound-becomes-torture

25890890235.png 


I am not health professional , but I believe I am working with the right health professional I can trust and I do following these instructions and recover.  I am simply tell my story and how I recover from my condition. There is still so much unknown about human body and I just like to think all my treatment and my magic body heal itself.
0
M

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest
it is all gone after 2 months pink noise therapy.


Really ? Can u tell me more about it? I dont hve tinnitus or hyperacusis but i do have the blocked and fullness feeling ?
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #11 
You can find it here.
https://www.chat-hyperacusis.net/post/2-months-into-the-pink-noise-therapy-10190824?pid=1309038880

Have you checked by a health professional who understand the condition?
Mine is a mild case , it might explain once I follow the correct therapy , the recovery is quick.
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M

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest
You can find it here.
https://www.chat-hyperacusis.net/post/2-months-into-the-pink-noise-therapy-10190824?pid=1309038880

Have you checked by a health professional who understand the condition?
Mine is a mild case , it might explain once I follow the correct therapy , the recovery is quick.


Yeah i went to a lot of Ents and they say it should go away but dont know a lot of it i think...my ear also pops randomly sometimes... i will try the pink noise
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web

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest
it is all gone after 2 months pink noise therapy.


So you are completely pain free with no symptoms of hyperacusis? You can go into a noisy bar and be fine?
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by web


So you are completely pain free with no symptoms of hyperacusis? You can go into a noisy bar and be fine?

I am not a Bar Person , but I start going to seminar again. I will choose my seat carefully and I think my ear is fine but I am afraid it might cause my ear to hurt again. I have a 2 months old baby and so far I am doing fine and I have not used any ear plug for a long time but I do keep the around just in case. I still stick to the 8 hours pink noise every day.
Hope this helps you. Have you ordered the pink noise from the network and tried the pink noise therapy?
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by M


Yeah i went to a lot of Ents and they say it should go away but dont know a lot of it i think...my ear also pops randomly sometimes... i will try the pink noise

I totally understand , Have you ordered the pink noise from the network and tried the pink noise therapy?
0
M

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest

I totally understand , Have you ordered the pink noise from the network and tried the pink noise therapy?


Yes yesterday night i tried to listen to pink noise. Do u think my fulness has a chance of going away ? My ears dont hurt and i dont have tinnitus. Did your ear also pop sometimes ?
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web

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest
Have you ordered the pink noise from the network and tried the pink noise therapy?


I am using a spotify pink noise playlist. I've only been using it a few days but it seems like it's helping. I found out about hyperacusis last week trying to find out why my ears feel full and like they have a bad sunburn deep inside, and also why noises like dishes clinking are starting to hurt them.

Thankfully I seem to have found out about H before most people who get it do. It seems like a lot of people try to push through the pain and make it much worse. I would say mine is on the milder end of moderate, not truly mild, but not truly moderate. Also a lot of people struggle to find out what is wrong with their ears for many months whereas I almost immediately found the issue.

Once I get paid I'll order the pink noise therapy from the site just to have the proven therapy.

Did you gradually increase the volume of the pink noise? If so how often did you do that? Once a week? Once a month?

I'm also following Adam's advice and only protecting my ears in truly loud situations like concerts. I went to a bar with friends yesterday and it was very uncomfortable but I resisted the urge to use earplugs. My ears are worse today but I think that's part of the recovery process. In my opinion you have to push through regular noises even if they hurt you, because they are not really hurting your hearing they're just tricking your mind into incorrectly triggering a pain signal at too low a volume. If you avoid regular volumes too much I think your ears will get worse, which is why overprotecting with earplugs makes things worse. However today I'll rest my ears so as not to overexpose them and constantly hurt them. I think an approach of expose>heal until slightly more resistant>expose>heal until slightly even more resistant... all while doing 8 hours per day of pink noise... this might be optimal. But keep in mind when I say expose I just mean regular volumes. And progress will be gradual and very slow. I think it's like doing weight training, you lift, rest a day or two, then lift a little more.
0
JohnMarc

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Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by web


I am using a spotify pink noise playlist. I've only been using it a few days but it seems like it's helping. I found out about hyperacusis last week trying to find out why my ears feel full and like they have a bad sunburn deep inside, and also why noises like dishes clinking are starting to hurt them.

Thankfully I seem to have found out about H before most people who get it do. It seems like a lot of people try to push through the pain and make it much worse. I would say mine is on the milder end of moderate, not truly mild, but not truly moderate. Also a lot of people struggle to find out what is wrong with their ears for many months whereas I almost immediately found the issue.

Once I get paid I'll order the pink noise therapy from the site just to have the proven therapy.

Did you gradually increase the volume of the pink noise? If so how often did you do that? Once a week? Once a month?

I'm also following Adam's advice and only protecting my ears in truly loud situations like concerts. I went to a bar with friends yesterday and it was very uncomfortable but I resisted the urge to use earplugs. My ears are worse today but I think that's part of the recovery process. In my opinion you have to push through regular noises even if they hurt you, because they are not really hurting your hearing they're just tricking your mind into incorrectly triggering a pain signal at too low a volume. If you avoid regular volumes too much I think your ears will get worse, which is why overprotecting with earplugs makes things worse. However today I'll rest my ears so as not to overexpose them and constantly hurt them. I think an approach of expose>heal until slightly more resistant>expose>heal until slightly even more resistant... all while doing 8 hours per day of pink noise... this might be optimal. But keep in mind when I say expose I just mean regular volumes. And progress will be gradual and very slow. I think it's like doing weight training, you lift, rest a day or two, then lift a little more.



I like how you're approaching this i.e. the expose>heal>expose approach. I had a similar approach except I got my ears exposed just enough every day to need only a night's worth of rest.. and then back it at the next day.. occasionally I would overexpose and need a couple of days rest but that was unintended and I THINK slowed my recovery process.. I'm not saying my approach is better, I'm just saying it's what worked for me.. after a certain point I was also able to play a pink noise machine all night and wouldn't feel like my ears were tired from it in the morning, so that was an additional layer in my regimen.. but gotta be very careful playing pink or white noise overnight.. the reason being that listening to sounds during the day you are getting good feedback from your ears about when it might be getting too much etc so you can take a break.. but listening to sounds when asleep might not give the same kind of live feedback and you might not notice how it might have been "too much" until the next morning.
0
ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by web


I am using a spotify pink noise playlist. I've only been using it a few days but it seems like it's helping. I found out about hyperacusis last week trying to find out why my ears feel full and like they have a bad sunburn deep inside, and also why noises like dishes clinking are starting to hurt them.

Thankfully I seem to have found out about H before most people who get it do. It seems like a lot of people try to push through the pain and make it much worse. I would say mine is on the milder end of moderate, not truly mild, but not truly moderate. Also a lot of people struggle to find out what is wrong with their ears for many months whereas I almost immediately found the issue.

Once I get paid I'll order the pink noise therapy from the site just to have the proven therapy.

Did you gradually increase the volume of the pink noise? If so how often did you do that? Once a week? Once a month?

I'm also following Adam's advice and only protecting my ears in truly loud situations like concerts. I went to a bar with friends yesterday and it was very uncomfortable but I resisted the urge to use earplugs. My ears are worse today but I think that's part of the recovery process. In my opinion you have to push through regular noises even if they hurt you, because they are not really hurting your hearing they're just tricking your mind into incorrectly triggering a pain signal at too low a volume. If you avoid regular volumes too much I think your ears will get worse, which is why overprotecting with earplugs makes things worse. However today I'll rest my ears so as not to overexpose them and constantly hurt them. I think an approach of expose>heal until slightly more resistant>expose>heal until slightly even more resistant... all while doing 8 hours per day of pink noise... this might be optimal. But keep in mind when I say expose I just mean regular volumes. And progress will be gradual and very slow. I think it's like doing weight training, you lift, rest a day or two, then lift a little more.


I love your approach and I am happy for your progress. Regarding the Spotify pink noise , you might want to read this 
https://hyperacusisfocus.org/pink-noise/
That's the reason  I decide to purchase the network pink noise as I am not a scientist who can understand the difference. listening to pink noise 8 hours a day is a hard work, especially at the beginning so I want to make sure I got the real pink noise.
0
ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnMarc



I like how you're approaching this i.e. the expose>heal>expose approach. I had a similar approach except I got my ears exposed just enough every day to need only a night's worth of rest.. and then back it at the next day.. occasionally I would overexpose and need a couple of days rest but that was unintended and I THINK slowed my recovery process.. I'm not saying my approach is better, I'm just saying it's what worked for me.. after a certain point I was also able to play a pink noise machine all night and wouldn't feel like my ears were tired from it in the morning, so that was an additional layer in my regimen.. but gotta be very careful playing pink or white noise overnight.. the reason being that listening to sounds during the day you are getting good feedback from your ears about when it might be getting too much etc so you can take a break.. but listening to sounds when asleep might not give the same kind of live feedback and you might not notice how it might have been "too much" until the next morning.

Hi John , I have been reading a lot of your posts in the past , thanks for sharing your journey and it made a lot of difference to me. 
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by M


Yes yesterday night i tried to listen to pink noise. Do u think my fulness has a chance of going away ? My ears dont hurt and i dont have tinnitus. Did your ear also pop sometimes ?

Yes , it went away for me. I have the same doubt , what I did is what write in the post. Just always be positive and always read,listen and watch the positive thing and if in doubt asking your trusted health professional. Hope you will have a speedy recovery.
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JohnMarc

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Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ybbest

Hi John , I have been reading a lot of your posts in the past , thanks for sharing your journey and it made a lot of difference to me. 


Thank you. And I'm glad that it made a difference to you. Happy for you that you are doing better. And thank you also for sharing positive and helpful posts on this site for the benefit of everyone.
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web

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnMarc



I like how you're approaching this i.e. the expose>heal>expose approach. I had a similar approach except I got my ears exposed just enough every day to need only a night's worth of rest.. and then back it at the next day.. occasionally I would overexpose and need a couple of days rest but that was unintended and I THINK slowed my recovery process.. I'm not saying my approach is better, I'm just saying it's what worked for me.. after a certain point I was also able to play a pink noise machine all night and wouldn't feel like my ears were tired from it in the morning, so that was an additional layer in my regimen.. but gotta be very careful playing pink or white noise overnight.. the reason being that listening to sounds during the day you are getting good feedback from your ears about when it might be getting too much etc so you can take a break.. but listening to sounds when asleep might not give the same kind of live feedback and you might not notice how it might have been "too much" until the next morning.


If your ears are hurting/burning do you use pink noise? I’m not sure if I should rest them or if the pink noise will make them feel better. It’s almost like resting them hurts more than treating them with pink noise.
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ybbest

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by web


If your ears are hurting/burning do you use pink noise? I’m not sure if I should rest them or if the pink noise will make them feel better. It’s almost like resting them hurts more than treating them with pink noise.


I still listen to Pink noise even if my ear is feel uncomfortable. However , I made a mistake of not following the instructions that comes with the Pink noise from this site. Basically , the volume is too loud for me , it ends up making my ear uncomfortable. 

After I adjust the volume , I do not feel I was listening to pink noise. After 5-10mins , I will forget about there is pink noise in my ear. I am using open-air headset.
https://www.amazon.com/Sony-MDR110LP-Open-air-Stereo-Headphones/dp/B000EGLZU4
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MattR

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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast
> 1. Reduce hypervigilant behavior ex. Don't tease up/brace yourself for sound - take a deep breath if you're about to be exposed to a sudden abrupt noise. Learn to relax your body in normal sound environments below 85db
------------------------------------


Respectfully I disagree with this, if noise causes burning pain one could logically assume that  it is doing them harm.  We need to keep an open mind about different types of hyperacusis and why some people get better and others don't.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/joycecohen/noise-kills-when-everyday-sound-becomes-torture

25890890235.png 


The issue with this is we know hair cells can become damaged, but this in no way correlates to having actual pain. Hearing loss yes, but not hyperacusis. We don't know what the actual cause of hyperacusis is. If it was simply hair cells being damaged then why doesn't everyone with hearing loss and Tinnitus suffer from hyperacusis?
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattR


The issue with this is we know hair cells can become damaged, but this in no way correlates to having actual pain. Hearing loss yes, but not hyperacusis. We don't know what the actual cause of hyperacusis is. If it was simply hair cells being damaged then why doesn't everyone with hearing loss and Tinnitus suffer from hyperacusis?


We don't know what causes hyperacusis (there are undoubtedly multiple causes anyway).  One  hypothesis of "a" potential cause of hyperacusis is that there are several types of hair cells.  The large majority transmit sound to the brain.  A small percentage detect loudness levels.  When the first group is damaged, you get hearing loss.  When the second group is damaged, you get hyperacusis, due to abnormal loudness signals reaching the brain.

This is a theory I am leaning towards.

Sound therapy "works" in many patients by retraining the brain to respond to abnormal loudness signals in a healthy and appropriate way- ie, not too loud and painful.  Even if the signal is never corrected, brains can learn to compensate.

Undoubtedly, with hyperacusis pain there is a negative learning effect possible as well.  Once hyperacusis is induced the brain can "learn" to respond to sounds in an even more inappropriate way... pain and discomfort can make the brain generate even more pain and discomfort.

Avoidance of sound also can cause more extreme reactions in the brain to sound unfortunately.


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MattR

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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado


We don't know what causes hyperacusis (there are undoubtedly multiple causes anyway).  One  hypothesis of "a" potential cause of hyperacusis is that there are several types of hair cells.  The large majority transmit sound to the brain.  A small percentage detect loudness levels.  When the first group is damaged, you get hearing loss.  When the second group is damaged, you get hyperacusis, due to abnormal loudness signals reaching the brain.

This is a theory I am leaning towards.

Sound therapy "works" in many patients by retraining the brain to respond to abnormal loudness signals in a healthy and appropriate way- ie, not too loud and painful.  Even if the signal is never corrected, brains can learn to compensate.

Undoubtedly, with hyperacusis pain there is a negative learning effect possible as well.  Once hyperacusis is induced the brain can "learn" to respond to sounds in an even more inappropriate way... pain and discomfort can make the brain generate even more pain and discomfort.

Avoidance of sound also can cause more extreme reactions in the brain to sound unfortunately.




That somewhat makes sense, but doesn't explain why people have hyperacusis without being exposed to a loud event. Regardless the most important thing is that their is currently no evidence that shows hyperacusis is caused by some sort of permanent physical damage. Again, if that was the case, it seems highly likely that many more people would have hyperacusis, on a scale similar to Tinnitus at the very least. It is most likely the brains response to a physical problem.

I just think that's important for people dealing with hyperacusis to remember. I've seen posts on the Facebook group and message boards where it's non stop telling people it's permanent damage that can never be fixed and to literally where earplugs at the sound of leaves rustling. That's not healthy and is just reinforcing the problem.
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattR

I've seen posts on the Facebook group and message boards where it's non stop telling people it's permanent damage that can never be fixed and to literally where earplugs at the sound of leaves rustling. That's not healthy and is just reinforcing the problem.


I agree with you completely.  This a big problem, and this is message that the media tends to regurgitate on the rare occasions they actually mention hyperacusis.
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Ed

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Posts: 113
Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by web

There is also the psychological component. Some have suggested that worrying about noise damage causes the brain to release chemicals that essentially keep you in a permanent state of hyperacusis. And that 'knowing' that you are not actually harming your ears is the first step to recovery. Lots of accounts online support this theory.


I've had H over ten years, and this is the most important step you'll ever take. Sound, pain - all sensory experience is created in your brain. You can influence it because 'you' are your brain. Don't focus or worry about pain, it is never unbearable - you are bearing the pain by the very act of continuing to live.

Don't worry about it - you'll be amazed at how fast your life can change.
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MattR

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed


I've had H over ten years, and this is the most important step you'll ever take. Sound, pain - all sensory experience is created in your brain. You can influence it because 'you' are your brain. Don't focus or worry about pain, it is never unbearable - you are bearing the pain by the very act of continuing to live.

Don't worry about it - you'll be amazed at how fast your life can change.


I'm currently in the middle of this process. My ear certainly hurts, however I don't feel like it hurts more than it has previously despite wearing earplugs much less and exposing myself to louder sounds than I have. I'm hoping continuing this process of accepting the pain while also accepting that it is not normal nor should I be feeling this pain will lead to some improvement. I do believe the issue does stem from brain activity and perception, as opposed to something like a soft tissue injury where there is a legitimate cause for pain.
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed


I've had H over ten years, and this is the most important step you'll ever take. Sound, pain - all sensory experience is created in your brain. You can influence it because 'you' are your brain. Don't focus or worry about pain, it is never unbearable - you are bearing the pain by the very act of continuing to live.

Don't worry about it - you'll be amazed at how fast your life can change.


He is right.  Worrying about ear pain can actually cause it.  Stupid but true.  (This not the only cause of ear pain for hyperacusis patients, but this does indeed happen sometimes with me).
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M

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #32 
Yeah, i worry a lot about it.... and it's not really the pressure in my ears but more like the blocked and tight feeling around the ears and my jawline... I will try to worry less about it....
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