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DR

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,

Early thirties male in the UK. Unfortunately seem to have triggered a mixture of hyperacusis in one ear and constant tinnitus in the other after a bad accident with volume control while listening to orchestral music at night.

It began about three weeks ago, and it's come and gone, but it's not improving by itself. My GP has told me to give it another couple of weeks before they examine the ears as part of a referral to audiology. However I know the audiology services in my part of the country are still suspended as part of the COVID-19/Coronavirus lockdown, and may not re-open for some time.

In the meantime, I'd like to ask for any advice folks might want to give in dealing with this in its early stages. I'm not using earplugs/muffs, since I've already read that this can be entirely counter-intuitive. 

I'm actually already housebound because of a different condition, so I'm not going to be going out to concerts, going to the movies or mowing the lawn anytime soon anyway. I do want to find a way to mitigate my sensitivity and tinnitus to regular indoor sound, if possible, until I'm in a position to get a formal diagnosis and start treatment.
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Artman

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi DR,

The key to the treatment to your collapsed sound tolerance is surrounding yourself 24/7 with
low level noise. It can be white noise, pink noise or nature sounds. It looks like you have mild case so I think in 2-4 months you'll get back to normal. The tinnitus is probably form increased sensitivity, so as you treat this it should also fade. For now you need to stay away from loud sounds, as your ears heal, but absolutely the worst thing one can do is to overuse earplugs, this is road to hell leading to increased sensitivity. For the future I would forget about loud concerts, bars without protection, your ears will always be more vulnerable, 

be patient and start listening and you'll be good.
Artur
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DR

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artman
Hi DR,

The key to the treatment to your collapsed sound tolerance is surrounding yourself 24/7 with
low level noise. It can be white noise, pink noise or nature sounds. It looks like you have mild case so I think in 2-4 months you'll get back to normal. The tinnitus is probably form increased sensitivity, so as you treat this it should also fade. For now you need to stay away from loud sounds, as your ears heal, but absolutely the worst thing one can do is to overuse earplugs, this is road to hell leading to increased sensitivity. For the future I would forget about loud concerts, bars without protection, your ears will always be more vulnerable, 

be patient and start listening and you'll be good.
Artur


Thank you very much for the reply Artur, it's quite reassuring!

I'm just a bit intimidated at the moment. Advice concerning the conditions of hyperacusis and tinnitus seem quite, uh, mixed from what I've seen. I've already seen everything from "Nothing to worry about!" to "You're doomed!", and it's a bit difficult to parse what I should and shouldn't be doing since I'm in a bit of limbo before I can see an audiologist.

May I ask how your experience has been, broadly speaking? I noticed that you originally joined the forum a decade ago.
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Artman

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #4 
Don't read negative stories, those who don't improve usually do nothing to improve, they stay in silence etc. You're not doomed to this condition for life!

The mechanism behind H&T is that when the brain detects some insult in the auditory system (too loud music) it suddenly increases the gain that's why everything sounds too loud for you and you hear T. The goal of the H treatment is to bring that gain down (desensitize auditory sytem). Human auditory system is a self regulating mechanism that's why you need to avoid silence and bring that low level noise 24/7 so that it can tune down to normal again.

A decade ago I was like you. Everything was too loud, T was screeching, I could hear things that normally I wouldn't be able to hear like bats flying, somebody striking car keys 500 m away. It was a huge shock to my nervous system but I slowly managed back to normal with help of low level noise. I was better after 2.5mo and much better after 7 and after about 1.5 year to be frank I forgot about H and was back windsurfing, kitesurfing (with earplugs) etc.

Don't expect much from audiologists because they usually know next to nothing about H. Don't let them run at this stage any unnecessary loud test like MRI or otoe. The sooner you start low level noise the sooner you'll get back to normal.
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Cathu

Registered:
Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artman
Hi DR,

The key to the treatment to your collapsed sound tolerance is surrounding yourself 24/7 with
low level noise. It can be white noise, pink noise or nature sounds. It looks like you have mild case so I think in 2-4 months you'll get back to normal. The tinnitus is probably form increased sensitivity, so as you treat this it should also fade. For now you need to stay away from loud sounds, as your ears heal, but absolutely the worst thing one can do is to overuse earplugs, this is road to hell leading to increased sensitivity. For the future I would forget about loud concerts, bars without protection, your ears will always be more vulnerable, 

be patient and start listening and you'll be good.
Artur

Hi DR
How are you?
SO sorry  this happened.
Music  is  such a joy and to lose  the joy  is the absolute pits.  I am housebound too....due  to previous, like yourself.  Then I had my ears micro suctioned December 2018  and since them  screaming Tinnitus and Hyperacusis.  I haven't mown the lawn  since then or whipper snippered. I cut the lawn the other day with  scissors!...it s  a small courtyard ..  I cut it cause  I thought the Solar panel fellows would use the not too steep access  for the roof there, but they chose  the highest point  to carry up the panels. But the grass looks good that Cut.  I might get weed mat and then pebble it  and turn it into a Japanese  style courtyard  with big pots,  so I won;t ever have  t worry about mowing..
I have Ear defender molded ear plugs made and they are great at times  when in the city  .  I went into town last week and theres council mowing and slashimg! I couldn;t escape and had  to walk past.  It s hard sometimes. 
Be kind  to yourself and wear plugs when you want too. It s nice  to give your ears a rest from the outside  world noise.  Its noisy enough with our head noises.
What does yours  sound like?
Mine s like a noisy factory ,  there about 6 noises at once, and then random bipping  and pinging at times...
I used to loathe how quiet it was, but now I  pray for  quiet.
Have you had an MRI  yet? If you do take you ear plus too. They have over the ear muffs, but it is still   so loud.
I hear some peoples tinnitus is temporary. I hope that is for you. 
Do you have hyperacusis too?

Take care there
CATH


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LukaKorda

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #6 
I'm also new with hyperacusis, due to sound exposure.  Happened a couple months ago, but onset rolled out slowly.  Hopefully it has stopped progressing - I have even started to see some improvements; though also some setbacks (mild but high pitched tinnitus finally emerged a week ago).  My question for those who know, how low or high of sound exposure should I go?  It seems I have mild hyperacusis, with mild tinnitus. 

I've read a lot.  I am doing pink noise through a iPhone smartphone app, with the volume set at two clicks above 0 (off), using open earphones sitting on top of ears.  I've been doing that for 2-3 weeks.  Should I increase the volume eventually?  Every month?

I also have been listening to a classical/jazz radio station when I'm home (classical day/jazz evening), which is often (thanks COVID), to keep my ears busy.  According to my smartphone sound meter,I've been listening to this in the 45-55 dB range.  Is that too high? Should I go higher?  Should I gradually increase it?  It's not bothering me at current level, and it's helping to keep anxiety down. 

What bothers me most are the usuals - high pitched beeping (construction vehicles backing up), clanking dishes, motorcycle gangs out on a joy ride.  And generally sound that is perceived (for now) too loud - I estimate above 75-80dB.  

I also have a clicking sensation in my ears when swallowing and yawning.  Annoying.  I've been reducing stress and ignoring it and it has helped to lower the intensity.  Will that go away or greatly lessen as I treat hyperacusis?  

So if there is a (hopefully free) how to guide in self-treating with pink noise and sound exposure, please let me know.  I feel I have the anxiety component down.  I am not fearing noise and not protecting other than covering ears when extremely offending sounds approach (firetrucks!), and gently putting away dishes. My May was stressful, but I now feel confident.
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Artman

Registered:
Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukaKorda
I'm also new with hyperacusis, due to sound exposure.  Happened a couple months ago, but onset rolled out slowly.  Hopefully it has stopped progressing - I have even started to see some improvements; though also some setbacks (mild but high pitched tinnitus finally emerged a week ago).  My question for those who know, how low or high of sound exposure should I go?  It seems I have mild hyperacusis, with mild tinnitus. 

I've read a lot.  I am doing pink noise through a iPhone smartphone app, with the volume set at two clicks above 0 (off), using open earphones sitting on top of ears.  I've been doing that for 2-3 weeks.  Should I increase the volume eventually?  Every month?

I also have been listening to a classical/jazz radio station when I'm home (classical day/jazz evening), which is often (thanks COVID), to keep my ears busy.  According to my smartphone sound meter,I've been listening to this in the 45-55 dB range.  Is that too high? Should I go higher?  Should I gradually increase it?  It's not bothering me at current level, and it's helping to keep anxiety down. 

What bothers me most are the usuals - high pitched beeping (construction vehicles backing up), clanking dishes, motorcycle gangs out on a joy ride.  And generally sound that is perceived (for now) too loud - I estimate above 75-80dB.  

I also have a clicking sensation in my ears when swallowing and yawning.  Annoying.  I've been reducing stress and ignoring it and it has helped to lower the intensity.  Will that go away or greatly lessen as I treat hyperacusis?  

So if there is a (hopefully free) how to guide in self-treating with pink noise and sound exposure, please let me know.  I feel I have the anxiety component down.  I am not fearing noise and not protecting other than covering ears when extremely offending sounds approach (firetrucks!), and gently putting away dishes. My May was stressful, but I now feel confident.


Hi Luka,

Just set it at the comfortable level, I think that 55db might be too much, cause it may spike temporally your T. The idea is that the sound level should be set between barely audible and comfortable for you. You don’t have to increase and bombard your ears as this will get you setback. Your H is mild, just give them time to recover. Get some speaker in your bedroom and play nature sounds like waves or rain at night at comfortable level just as a background noise, not to loud. In time all H effect will slowly fade but always protect ears against loud sounds, concerts, bars should be now out of question and in the future even the best earplugs may not be enough to protect you. As for clicking when swallowing it’s normal for everyone even without H.

Take care,
Artur
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