The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Taylorslay

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #1 
I don't rarely come to Hyperacusis Net. I usually go to Tinnitus talk or Facebook groups for help with my H.

I'm 17 and I got my Hyperacusis when I was 16 from years of chronic loud headphone use. It use to be awfully severe. It has slowly gotten better over the past few months, every spike is never as bad as the last.

My family for months didn't care. Honestly they would patronize me and be intentional loud. That's abusive tbh. Now recently they have began to listen. But a parent I don't live with still doesn't care and thinks all this hearing loss, Tinnitus doesn't hyperacusis is a bunch of anxiety. They forced me to get a job. Which honestly isn't a bad thing. However, having Hyperacusis puts me in a position where I walk a fine line of either disabling myself or living life.

This job is in a convenience store. Music playing but not so loud it's over baring. At best, manageable. The part I fear for my safety is the walkie-talkie ear piece they require me to wear. I mentioned this to my soon to be manager, (because they did recently hire me) and they said that I am required to wear the ear bud piece looking walkie talkies but I can turn it down.

Now that wouldn't bother me except EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING SPIKES ME!! EVEN THINGS THAT DONT HURT ME OR CAUSE MY EARDRUM TO FLUTTER.

I either possibly disable myself more or be taunted and hurt by one of my parents for leaving the position.
0
DanMalcore

Avatar / Picture

Dan
Registered:
Posts: 1,456
Reply with quote  #2 
There are jobs everywhere these days.  I will get right to the point.  You need to find a job that does not require you to wear an ear piece.  The condition you have right now with your ears comes with a startle reflex response.  You need to make a change.

Getting a job at your age is a very good idea.  If I were you I would land a new job before quitting your current job.  That way your family doesn't see it as a fail.

Good luck...

Dan

__________________
"Yesterday is ashes, tomorrow is wood, only today does the fire burn brightly"
0
Taylorslay

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanMalcore
There are jobs everywhere these days.  I will get right to the point.  You need to find a job that does not require you to wear an ear piece.  The condition you have right now with your ears comes with a startle reflex response.  You need to make a change.

Getting a job at your age is a very good idea.  If I were you I would land a new job before quitting your current job.  That way your family doesn't see it as a fail.

Good luck...

Dan


What do you mean by "startle relfex response"? Everything comes off amplifying loud or pain or both.
0
EDogg

Registered:
Posts: 174
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Taylorslay,

I agree with Dan’s advice for you.. This job doesn’t sound like a healthy fit for someone who is trying to recover from significant hyperacusis.

Startle reflex response— What happens when you hear a very loud sudden sound? You jump. Your heart starts racing. You look for danger. Right? That is essentially the startle reflex response. It is unconsciously wired into everyone’s brain as a protective mechanism. For people with hyperacusis, we hear everyday normal sounds often as very loud, or very painful, when other people do not. This can cause us to over-engage this reflexive response, which in turn, can make our fear (and avoidance) of sound worse, leading to a vicious cycle of over protection, over-active nerves (anxiety, panic, irritability) and worsening hyperacusis. This is why Having to wear that ear piece, or even a walkie talkie, which randomly blares out harsh sounds all day, is not a good environment fir one trying to heal from this. My advice, for what it’s worth..

1) get a proper hearing evaluation and diagnosis, if not done already. Find an audiologist who is knowledgeable in hyperacusis and start treatment.

2) try to find another job where you don’t have to wear ear piece or headset and where you can tolerate the sounds in the background

Glad you reached out. Hope this helps.

Best,
EDogg
0
Ghirin11

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #5 
Hello,
I have been wearing my TRT generator for about 3 months. I have seen a little improvement. This thread caught my attention because it speaks about the startle response. Ironically, the uplift I realized when I found out I would be able to travel to a warmer climate for the winter turned into a potential casualty for my ears. I am teleworking and have been seated right next to metal door that slams open and closed all day long. I have literally become afraid of sound and brace for it. And considering space is tight and I was allowed to travel with my husband under a reasonable accommodation, I cannot ask for another desk. I fear this is setting me back and yet my Audiologist says to learn to tolerate everyday noises. The lovely weather has been great for my mental attitude but this door thing has me rattled. I am here for another 2 1/2 months. Should I be worrying?? The door is on my good ear side but to be honest, my good ear is starting to feel pressure and discomfort. Certainly, not to the degree of my bad ear.

Mona in Maine

__________________
Mona Ghirin
0
EDogg

Registered:
Posts: 174
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Mona,

Glad to hear you are making some improvements with TRT, first of all. That’s very encouraging!

That’s a tough spot to be in with the working situation you describe and door noise. I encounter probably what is a somewhat similar situation at my work, as well, and I have very little control over it, like you. I am happy to share my thoughts of how I work through it. I don’t claim to know the answers; this is just the way I happen to reason through something similar in my challenges with hyperacusis.

The startle response is really an important protective mechanism for survival. However, in folks like us, who have sustained some degree of physiologic injury to auditory system, it can become over engaged and fear/avoidance/anxiety of sound can really take a strong hold. It is, after all, wired directly into the most primitive and conserved brain stem regions. I struggle with fear and avoidance of sounds a lot. I think one of the best ways for to deal with it, quite honestly, it is to be aware of it, consciously. Being aware of your thoughts, in a sort of non judgemental way, can help deflate the fear response. I work in a laboratory in a large tertiary care hospital. I am around all sorts of beeps, and machine noises, overhead announcements, fire drills, loud co-workers, music.. many many sounds that are uncomfortable at times and very unpredictable. I often remind myself that: “Yes, while some of these sounds hurt, they are not harming me or causing worsening or physical damage”. “Yes, they may exacerbate my tinnitus or hyperacusis, but it’s not permanent.” I am assuming the door noises aren’t ear damagingly loud; if that’s the case, the company should do something about it! I know some folks may disagree with this approach, but that is how I see it, and what I have learned from those veterans who have successfully overcome this condition. When things get bad, and they do occasionally become unbearable, I just get up and go for a walk and remove myself for a bit. I also will put in my earplugs or Bose noise canceling headphones if I have to. I have found ear plugs seem to work better for the higher frequency sounds and the sound cancelling headphones work well for lower frequencies. It’s important to be kind to yourself. Also, you definitely have an end point here..2.5 months.. so even if you find the situation suboptimal, despite trying to work around it, you aren’t stuck there.

I hope you might find some of this helpful. Keep at the TRT and hopefully, in due time, you (and I) will be at a point where we don’t even give these sounds a second thought!

Best,
EDogg
0
Ghirin11

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #7 
Hello Edogg,

Thank you so much for your words of support and wisdom. This condition can really take over your life and make you feel isolated. I don’t even bother trying to explain it to people because #1 I cant take the energy to talk as it exacerbates vibration and fullness and #2 Folks don’t really understand and I struggle explaining it.

I have been dealing with this door situation pretty much by trying to ignore it and not focus on it but by the end of the day I am really sensitive. I tend to be a person that is extremely hard on myself so thanks for reminding me to be kind. I will try getting up from my desk and getting away from it to get my mind off it.

Today, I turned off the microphone to my hearing aid. Mine is a combination sound generator and hearing aid, but with the hyperacusis, it makes it very difficult. Even though my Audiologist set it up that way, he was focused on the Tinnitus and hearing loss. I don’t have Tinnitus all the time, it comes and goes. My Audiologist was trained in the Jastreboff method. I am not sure he truly understands hyperacusis. I am going to give it a try this way (without the hearing aid and just the white noise). We will see how it goes.

I do hope that someday soon, I will be able to live life the way it was, without some much tension and anxiety.

Sounds like you have lots os sounds to deal with on a regular basis. I don’t know if I could handle a hospital setting (lab). You should be proud of yourself for the progress you have made. I don’t know what I would do without the help of all the people on these boards. You are all my angels!!!!!!!

Thanks again,

Mona

__________________
Mona Ghirin
0
Margy

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #8 
Mona: I’m glad to hear that you got away from the Maine winter to go somewhere warm. I would love that because I get a lot of pleasure and feeding of my soul from being in nature and seeing birds and plants, etc.

The big trouble is the slamming metal door. I would seriously try to put something on the edges of the door or the latching mechanism that would keep it from slamming. Even just something soft between parts that clang together. It doesn’t seem too much to ask for the door to not cause you pain while you are trying to work. It’s just a door!

In the college building where I teach, there was a new wing, where every single door in the whole wing would just free-fall slam shut. So if a class of thirty students are leaving a room, you hear “Bam!” “Bam!””Bam!” Heavy metal doors all of them, with no control to slow down the doors.

I asked the secretary about it, and she said she could get workers to install devices to control each door so it won’t slam. Now the hallway of horrors is no longer a problem!
0
Ghirin11

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #9 
Hello Margy,

Unfortunately, it is a security door that goes to a security island so it cannot be changed whatsoever. But like you said, i am just so grateful to be in a warmer climate for the winter that I will deal with it. I turned off the microphone on my hearing aids and that seemed to take the extreme sharpness down a notch.

I am happy to hear that you were able to eleviate several doors slamming. That must have been very difficult.

When I return to Maine, it will be May, which it typically a beautiful month. Do you have any tidbits of info to share on how you cope with TTTS.

Mona

__________________
Mona Ghirin
0
Taylorslay

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #10 
I forgot to give an update.

I went through with the job. And it actually made my H better. First day it was bad but it forced my ears and brain to adapt.

I have yet to have the earpiece but I have been vocal to my manager about this and they said I can have it turned down. Also there is a fit that is not inside the ear, which will likely be less harmful. I'll update when I begin to use it and see how it turns out.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.