The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Bourdon8

Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #1 
I bought a simple decibel meter and tested the sound at the church where I perform as organist and choir director. The results were surprising.

When I am practicing organ by myself, I find that my ears hurt unless I practice at a very low volume. It turns out that if I use the full organ, it puts out around 87 dBA, but I never use that much sound. 

Meanwhile, I'm not conscious of pain or distortion when I am actually accompanying a church service. I am playing the organ at a moderate level of sound, accompanying a choir and congregation. Surprisingly, this peaks as high as 93 dBA on the meter.

It seems like the problem may be that specific frequencies irritate my tinnitus even when they are soft in volume. Does this seem reasonable to you?
0
Cheryl_K

Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #2 
I have similar expiences with frequencies, tones, overtones, and timbres. People who have beautiful, mellifluous speaking and singing voices are too much for my auditory system to handle. It's been getting better over time, with special desensitization exercises that I have devised for myself. It is not a question of decibel at all.

What I find interesting is that your experiences during the actual church service are not as dependent on decibel level as opposed to when you are only practicing.

Are you enjoying the experience? Do the spirituality and community prayer give you a sense of peace? Of joy? I have found that endorphins may play a role in my own reactions. I might be having such a good time that the endorphins block the pain, as much or better than pain medication or chocolate. I'm not up to being able to tolerate church organs and group prayer and singing yet (said the former choir singer), but I can tolerate most noises when my grandson comes to visit. And then the next few days, now just a mild setback. Oh well. It was worth it.

A defining question: If you are able to tolerate the church service without immediate signs of T, does this effect last, or do you have some sort of T response later in time that seems to be related to nothing in particular? How do you feel when you wake up the next morning? Some people have commented that they were doing fine for awhile, and then one day wake up with really bad T and H.

I hope that this does not apply to you, but could this be a delayed setback? Has this type of phenomenon ever been studied?

I've become interested in delayed setback based not only on my experiences, but on some careful readings I've been doing on this message board. For me, it's helped me to remember to pace myself, not overdue it so much when I am feeling really happy to be "well" again, feeling like I'm ready to get back into the swing of things. How long I can go depends on several variables, which include how well I have slept, how well my neck and jaw feel, etc. But if I overdue it without taking a "time out" from auditory stimulation, I will have the inevitable setback.

I don't count things like sudden loud or brash noises, or laughing and joking around the dinner table (which I used to love), as they usually bring on an immediate setback.  I mean the episodes that just kind of "hit" us, and we don't know where it came from.

That's where mindfulness training and CBT come in. And why decibel level is, for many of us, not the most important variable to obsess over.

Cheryl
0
Bourdon8

Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for your reply, Cheryl. I think that when I am performing, I am conscious of being "on the job" and am striving to pull off the performance as professionally as possible. So I probably do not notice any discomfort that I feel. In the practice room, I am going over passages again and again carefully and have more mental capacity to think about my own body's reaction to what is happening.
0
Cheryl_K

Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks. That is also important data in figuring out why, where, when, and how.

I don't want to be a pest, but I'm really curious about all aspects of H and T.

Do you ever have any experiences of T or H that seem to come out of the blue? Or are they strictly related to your practice sessions?
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Bourdon8,

When you play organ by yourself, you respond more strongly to the sound against the quiet background. We respond more strongly to sounds in the absence of background noise. That's one argument for the use of sound enrichment. Also, when you playing the organ in during a church service there is more distraction, so less focused on your ears. 

regards,
John
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.