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Lazyboy63

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello i'm new to Tinnitus and Hyperacusis problems in my left ear - 6 weeks ago following a very loud music rehearsal.

My job is music composition and mixing for TV and i need to get back to work after taking a break following the incident.

i have been to ENT for a hearing test and and my actual hearing is fine.... apart from the T and H. They were kind and helpful and are offering an in ear noise generator along with relaxation techniques. 

My problem is this - after experimenting going back to working with music for 1 - 3 hours i found that my right ear is fine but my left ear is very sensitive listening to music at even speaking volume levels - approx 60- 65 DB. The result is i end up with slight left ear pain and increased tinnitus volume that hangs about for days before lowering to a more acceptable level with a rest from noise.

My thinking is this - It seems my left ear is currently broken but i have successfully tried working for 30 mins at speaking volume with one massive set of ear defenders (30 db attenuation) covering only the left ear leaving my good ear free to listen.Do people think that this system is flawed or useful long term just for work?  i dont want to make things worse.

i am open to any suggestions or work arounds that would to allow me to return to work soon with my one good ear?

Many thanks



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BCX

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Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi, sorry that you are experiencing such tragic events. To be honest, I believe that it is best to find a job that is a lot quieter. I say this because you wouldn't want to damage your other ear as well. I have T and H for 2 years now on both ears and it's horrible. However, I am now 80-85% recovered but am not cured. I don't know if there is a cure to this madness.

What I did to improve my sound tolerance is doing sound therapy (pink noise). Same technique as noise generators. Took me 6 months to see improvements but 2 years to somewhat get my life back.

Don't forget to wear ear protection when you're at your workplace. Extremely helpful and reliable.
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #3 
I will say it is pretty common for hyperacusis to start in one ear, and spread to the other.

I think you need to address it with sound therapy as soon as you can.  
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florian_89

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Posts: 50
Reply with quote  #4 
Hello Lazyboy,

I had a similar event destroying my left ear as you.
I dont want to encurage you, but my accident was 4 years ago.

I was a hobby music producer and I tried many times to do some productions again.

And every time I tried  to produce music again, I felt terrible afterwards for hours and days.
I stopped my hobby.

I suggest you to stop work in loud environment for your own health.
It can get worse if you dont adjust your life to a quiet one, at least for a while.

Best hopes for you

Florian

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florian_89

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Reply with quote  #5 
I forgot your question.

I have been covering one ear only. Its not good at all. Either open both or close both.
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Lazyboy63

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by florian_89
I forgot your question.

I have been covering one ear only. Its not good at all. Either open both or close both.


Hi thanks for the reply’s folks I can see you are trying to be realistic on my behalf but I want to carry on with music composition if possible. I should stress that I normally work at low volume levels (speaking volume ) on music so I can totally control my environment and avoid the one off situation that caused injury to my left ear.

Florian 88 - thanks for your response - why do both my ears have to be protected or not in your experience?

Thanks



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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #7 
Low level music should be ok if it is not bugging you.

Please try sound therapy.
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florian_89

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Posts: 50
Reply with quote  #8 

Hello Lazyboy,


I just want to tell you my story. 

This is very valuable advice from my side, which I wished I would have had when I got my injury somebody telling me.


I first could not tolerate speakers, when I listen to music for about 20min. 
After trying again and again and exposing myself to loud sounds again and again I could not tolerate moderate sound a year later. 
 
Your left ear is damaged and it will never be normal again (sorry to tell you that), 
it needs special care or you will end up in a much worse szenario as you are in now.
You would love to be at this point where you are in now.

Maybe you use musician earplugs on both ears for your work, but in the long therm I really suggest you look for a job without music.

This is my advice to you: STOP with MIXING.

To the one ear cover topic:
When you cover only one ear over a extended period of time (days/weeks) your brain gets confused. When you take the earplug out from the damaged ear after covering, everything will sound very weird. 

Once I did this for about 1 week and my brain started to amplify the left side a lot. I got a hissing sound from covering only one ear. 



Hyperacusis is a tragedy, where we sufferers are challenged to adapt our life to be a quiet one.


Best regards

Florian


 



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Essiesn

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #9 
Seek an ENT who is familiar with H & T. I spent way too much time and money with two different specialists then found The One who has been really helpful. What helped? Getting the correct diagnosis, prescribed treatment with Gabapentin, working with audiologists who know the condition, using TRT, some CBT. With their help I have retrained my brain to tolerate more sound, have completely weaned myself from earplugs, and in a few short months have seen measurable improvement on the LDL scale. The key point is finding the right professions to help. Do not give up!!!
Best of luck,
Essie
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MattR

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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Essiesn
Seek an ENT who is familiar with H & T. I spent way too much time and money with two different specialists then found The One who has been really helpful. What helped? Getting the correct diagnosis, prescribed treatment with Gabapentin, working with audiologists who know the condition, using TRT, some CBT. With their help I have retrained my brain to tolerate more sound, have completely weaned myself from earplugs, and in a few short months have seen measurable improvement on the LDL scale. The key point is finding the right professions to help. Do not give up!!!
Best of luck,
Essie


How did you find a proper ENT? I haven't had much luck finding one that actually knows anything about H.

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AnthonyO

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #11 
MattR:

Just a thought...

An E.N.T. (aka, an Oto-Rhino-Laryng-Ologist) are excellent medical professionals who are rather good at diagnosing & fighting infections that are connected between the "E"ar, "N"ose & "T"hroat, but when it comes to more VERY intricate infirmities and dysfunctions in the middle ear space, inner ear and auditory nerve that connects such ossicles to the brain via the 7th & 8th cranial nerves (aka as, The Auditory Nerve), to put it bluntly, E.N.T.s have a big and clumsy tract record in "rolling-that-dice" in that area.

Make it a good point to do your best to seek out a Board Certified Doctor of Audiology, Neuro-Otologist or Oto-Neurologist.

AnthonyO
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Febrele

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Posts: 85
Reply with quote  #12 
As a musician, I can tell you hyperacusis is life changing.

It is possible to adapt, but I'm not doing a lot of mixing. And when I do, I always do it a very low volume.

Also, some speakers and guitar sounds my ears can't tolerate. I have to cut some frequencies.

If music is your passion, I say, find a way to do it as a hobby, not a job. It being a hobby, you will be able to control the environment much more.
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MattR

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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #13 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyO
MattR:

Just a thought...

An E.N.T. (aka, an Oto-Rhino-Laryng-Ologist) are excellent medical professionals who are rather good at diagnosing & fighting infections that are connected between the "E"ar, "N"ose & "T"hroat, but when it comes to more VERY intricate infirmities and dysfunctions in the middle ear space, inner ear and auditory nerve that connects such ossicles to the brain via the 7th & 8th cranial nerves (aka as, The Auditory Nerve), to put it bluntly, E.N.T.s have a big and clumsy tract record in "rolling-that-dice" in that area.

Make it a good point to do your best to seek out a Board Certified Doctor of Audiology, Neuro-Otologist or Oto-Neurologist.

AnthonyO


Thanks for the advice Anthony. I actually contacted Myriam Westcott regarding Acoustic Shock Disorder, as that is 100% what I am dealing with (incident was caused by a phone too). I've had hyperacusis in one ear for years and i've never had the same symptoms my newly effected ear is having (constant sharp pain is the main issue, I guess caused from TTTS). 

There seems to be so many different variables to this issue, where the cause of one persons ear pain could be totally different than another persons ear pain. It all just gets wrapped up in this "hyperacusis" blanket.

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Stubbyj

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #14 
We musicians just can't help ourselves. If would have put music on hold and ceased seeking treatment for unilateral T I would be back a playing without H at this time (4 years ago). Due to "pushing it" and electro-acupunture I earned bi-lateral T, H, TTTS and some other fun stuff. I've had experts tell me I would be ok but it just wasn't the case.

In regards to you, I would as mentioned either walk away from music or a few years or keep decibles below speaking level and never use headphones. It stinks, but walking away will ensure things don't get worse and may provide for a more productive future. At first for me it was about returning to music whilst now it's being productive in life and remaining around for my family. Walking away at this point will at least leave you with hope for the future whereas pushing it and blowing it all to h*ll you may not only lose music but the hope which keeps us going. 

You will have good and bad days; make sure you don't push it on the good days as this is what got me. Physical therapy regarding all the muscles of the jaw and neck may be something to explore as there's no chance of making things worse yet "eliminating" a possible muscular element to your H.

This stuff is truly a nightmare and negatively life changing. Yes, some make it through and I hope you're a member of the lucky club. I truly don't mean to be negative; I'm simply trying to save you my experienced heartbreak, anxiety and intermittent depression.  
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MattR

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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbyj
We musicians just can't help ourselves. If would have put music on hold and ceased seeking treatment for unilateral T I would be back a playing without H at this time (4 years ago). Due to "pushing it" and electro-acupunture I earned bi-lateral T, H, TTTS and some other fun stuff. I've had experts tell me I would be ok but it just wasn't the case.

In regards to you, I would as mentioned either walk away from music or a few years or keep decibles below speaking level and never use headphones. It stinks, but walking away will ensure things don't get worse and may provide for a more productive future. At first for me it was about returning to music whilst now it's being productive in life and remaining around for my family. Walking away at this point will at least leave you with hope for the future whereas pushing it and blowing it all to h*ll you may not only lose music but the hope which keeps us going. 

You will have good and bad days; make sure you don't push it on the good days as this is what got me. Physical therapy regarding all the muscles of the jaw and neck may be something to explore as there's no chance of making things worse yet "eliminating" a possible muscular element to your H.

This stuff is truly a nightmare and negatively life changing. Yes, some make it through and I hope you're a member of the lucky club. I truly don't mean to be negative; I'm simply trying to save you my experienced heartbreak, anxiety and intermittent depression.  


You don't know you would have any better had you put music on hold. Some people get better by returning to there normal lives (with moderation). Some get better with silence. Some get better for no reason. Some don't get better.
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Stubbyj

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #16 
There's most certainly truth to your statement. 
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Febrele

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Posts: 85
Reply with quote  #17 
It is possible to adapt yourself and keep doing what you love (music). You just have to accept things can't be like they were before. It is possible to play and record at low volumes. You have to surround yourself with people who are understanding. You have to be patient.

I'm living proof of this, after a pause of 2 years after an intense period of hyperacusis, I made music again. 

https://choon.co/artists/sidekick/

[cool]
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