The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Kupe

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #1 
Hey gang-

As a longtime hyperacusis sufferer, I don't attend movies that will obviously be loud.    And I wear earplugs for all of them, at least until we're past the previews and into the feature so I have a feel for the noise level.

With that said, the current very popular film "Inception"is about dreams.  Surely, a movie about dreams can't be all that terribly loud, right?

Wrong.   It is insanely loud- even my wife who has no hyperacusis agreed.   Basically 2 1/2 hours of explosions, gunshots, car/truck/train chase and crashes, and very loud music that drowned out the dialog.    I asked the manager repeatedly to lower the volume, but when they wouldn't do that I had to leave.   A shame because I thought it was an interesting film.

But again- I advise any T or H sufferer to avoid this film.

Kupe




0
June

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 34
Reply with quote  #2 
Interesting you should mention this.  This morning I received an e-mail of strong warning about this movie from a non-hyperacusic friend.  She said that the movie was SO LOUD that her ears were hurting !
I don't go out to movies, anyway. . .   

__________________
You are on the right path.
0
Kupe

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #3 
June-

Thanks- that's interesting.

Here's something I wish theaters would offer.   How about during one matinee each day, they play the movie at non-damaging noise levels.   Say 72db max or thereabouts.  I realize that prime-time viewers wouldn't like that, so that's why I suggest a matinee during the week.  

I know I'd spend a lot more at the theaters if they did that.

Kupe 
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #4 
I wonder if someone without these challenges. that goes
may use an iphone with the app  that allows one to take decibel readings,
and will perhaps  take some readings and let other know how loud it really is?
(sounds like a good use for an app such as that)
Though i imagine the sound levels  could and would vary a bit - depending on where it is being shown. ......and perhaps were one is sitting in the theater.


0
Kupe

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks for the iPhone suggestion!    I didn't even realize there were DB meters for iPhone, and turns out there are quite a few.   I picked a "pro" one with good ratings, and I'll start trying to sample movies and post here.

But alas, there is no way I'm going back to Inception.   

Kupe
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Kupe,

One thing that would be difficult with what you mentioned, is that the peaks of sound are sometimes much louder than the other parts of the movie.
So in order for it not to exceed what you mention, the rest of the move may have to be pretty quite --- how quiet, I would not know as i don't know how much variation in db there normally  is ---- I've not been to an indoor movie in many years  but do know that many theaters seem to revamp their sound systems periodically...
I wonder how many or what percentage of  theaters,  use sound systems with sub woofers these days?  (I'm just curious as i think they could make the sound more difficult to tolerate, and finding places that did not use those types of sound systems MAY at least in some cases - make the sound easier to tolerate - though overall volume would still be important )
0
Kupe

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #7 
QB-

Good technical point there.    I think what was so objectionable about Inception was that the volume only rarely seemed to back off from peak.    Simply like a firehose for most of 2 1/2 hours.    I also read now that there are limitations of the iPhone microphone that make measurements above 100db unreliable.    Well, I can tell you that Inception probably only briefly got below 100db at any time.

So, just my anecdotal advice- avoid this movie in theaters and wait for the DVD.

Kupe
0
adventurrre

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #8 

I saw this movie last week and it totally hurt my ears, so many jarring loud noise transitions from quiet... an amazing movie dampened by H

0
cbBen

Registered:
Posts: 1,378
Reply with quote  #9 
Per a post of Lynn's a while back, movies peak at 107db (and I believe previews are louder).  It wouldn't surprise me if movies today are even louder.

Despite advice that I would "never have a setback from which I would not recover," to this day I have not recovered from the setback I had from a movie, despite TRT.  That was two and a half years ago. 

Getting significantly better comes slow and with difficulty.  Getting significantly worse is easy and takes but an instant.

__________________
Please resist the temptation to pick apart my post by quoting it piece by piece.
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Ben,

Would you please explain what happened with that setback....
if I remember right you were using hearing protection, (earplugs?) and because you noticed your tinnitus more, and it was bothersome  - you removed then, or one of them  - (is that correct?)

I think people should be aware and understand that while using hearing protection people do generally notice their tinnitus more, and also our hearing/ears can be a bit more sensitive for a bit after it is removed ..... so i think  being careful/ aware of the sound levels around us - when removing hearing protection can be a good idea.
0
sucuqu

Registered:
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #11 
i stopped going to movies in the theater even before H hit me.  just too loud for comfort.  Ben you are right about the previews as well.  And I liked your sentence:

"Getting significantly better comes slow and with difficulty.  Getting significantly worse is easy and takes but an instant"

Well not that i like it  but it rings true for me.  we persevere through setbacks.  su
0
cbBen

Registered:
Posts: 1,378
Reply with quote  #12 
Yes aQB your recollection is accurate.  I was wearing ear plugs during the first part of the film, but I removed them as the noise of my tinnitus competed with that of the film itself.  The film was too much noise for me, with and without ear plugs. 

Whether I had done as I did above, or kept the ear plugs in, or foregone them altogether, I still would have exited the theater in the same very bad position -- one from which I never fully recovered. 

__________________
Please resist the temptation to pick apart my post by quoting it piece by piece.
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Ben,

Thanks for your reply.
I think it's important for people to realize, whether  they have these challenges or not  that if one goes somewhere  such as a movie, concert, or other loud venue, and it's too loud - leaving is a good idea.

(Though sometimes  getting more distance from the source of the sound may also be helpful.)

You mentioned -

I was wearing ear plugs during the first part of the film, but I removed them as the noise of my tinnitus competed with that of the film itself.  The film was too much noise for me, with and without ear plugs. 

Leaving a place like that would be a good idea.....

You also  mentioned-

Whether I had done as I did above, or kept the ear plugs in, or foregone them altogether, I still would have exited the theater in the same very bad position

Did you stay for the whole movie...or leave part way into it?
Also, IF  you had not used hearing protection at all, and it was too loud - do you think you would you have stayed anyway?

0
cbBen

Registered:
Posts: 1,378
Reply with quote  #14 
I stayed, as the I could not tell the effect it was having during the film itself.  Leaving early would have been a good idea.  A better idea would have been not going in the first place.


__________________
Please resist the temptation to pick apart my post by quoting it piece by piece.
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #15 
HI Ben,

Thanks again for your reply.
With these challenges and even for those without them, the amount of time spent around loud sound  -  can make a difference .

And with hyperacusis - it's not just the volume it can also be the duration of time spent in a loud environment or around loud sound ......so leaving a place or environment, that is too loud, or becomes that way, can be helpful..

Something else I think is helpful  when it comes to these challenges,  is not to kick ourselves too hard over mistakes we make .. or things we should have, or could have  done differently..... but to learn from situations and understand what may be more helpful if we are in the same or a similar situation in the future ......
Some things become clearer when looking back, but like other things - it is all a learning process. And learning from our mistakes -  as well our "steps forward"  - can make the paths we travel easier .

What you mention about the movie, and remaining in the theater even though it was loud -- makes me wonder about something.
You have mentioned the effects some specific medication you have taken, 
has had on you at times - (when it comes to sound)
seemingly leaving you not fully  aware of sound levels - or perhaps not as accurately able to determine / notice   if something is too loud For You or Not - 
(making it seem like sound levels that were too loud were ok, or more ok than they  actually were )
And perhaps because of that - sometimes find  you  over did it (soundwise) while on some specific medication -
(at least that is the way it seems,  by what you have written in some other threads )
And because you have mentioned that in other threads,  and also because you say you did not realize the sound was too difficult for you while being at the movie -
I wonder, were you on any of that type of medication at that time?

in another thread you mentioned - (about medication you  take)

You may feel better, more like you did before hyperacusis, but based on my experience I would not advise going to loud places (movies, concerts) just because you may feel much as you did pre-hyperacusis.  Again, based on my experience, you may in fact NOT be the same or near the same, and accordingly be best advised to raise your tolerances systematically before delving back into the world of loud noise.

0
cbBen

Registered:
Posts: 1,378
Reply with quote  #16 
Yes it is Lyrica that seems to calm down the "auditory gain" aspect of this condition for me.  Without it the movie may well have sounded louder to me, and perhaps I would have left.

__________________
Please resist the temptation to pick apart my post by quoting it piece by piece.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.