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ProfNITSUD

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, so I used to be around a lot last year, my Hyperacusis fluctuates good and bad month to month it seems like so I try to just not always be thinking about. It's kind of bad right now.

But my favorite band of all time is going to be here this month, Manchester Orchestra, and I really want to go to their concert. Ive missed out on so many concerts I've wanted to see in the last two years because of Hyperacusis.

So my question is, do you think it would be a good idea or a bad idea to go? I've got musicians earplugs that I can wear, but I'm not sure if they'd be enough. I don't want to relapse bad, but I really don't want to miss this show. It's an indoor venue also.
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ontario78

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Reply with quote  #2 
I feel for you and I am in same boat. I love Manchester too!

It's a risky thing, too bad it's not at least outdoor..

I have considered attending some outdoor fests this upcoming summer..my H is improving, (at the moment) but we all know it can change like the tide...

would I go to an indoor concert? probably not.

and if I did, I would prob wear real earplugs..not sure what the musician ones are like though?

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ProfNITSUD

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the reply!

I think I decided against it, not worth the risk at this point. Maybe sometime down the line when I know my improvement is becoming permanent.

And musicians earplugs are specially made to fit your ears and they fit different ranging filters on them so you can choose how many dBs you want to block out. 
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ontario78

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yea, I understand. It's risky. Are you doing any TRT or anything to treat your H?

I haven't listened to the new album yet, have you? is it any good? I am big fan of their older stuff.

Sorry to hear you can't go..it's hard, I know.
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ProfNITSUD

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Reply with quote  #5 
I did Neuromonics for about a year, my Hyperacusis had gotten a lot better from it but is now starting to get worse again so I am going to be starting that back up again. I don't know if there is any proof that it actually helps but it seemed to work for me, and they check my LDLs every few months and they were improving significantly for awhile.

The new album is nothing like their older stuff, its really hard rock so it might be a little hard to listen to with H, I like the music a lot but still haven't been able to fully enjoy music like I used to since all this started.
But if you are a fan of them at all, I would recommend it.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi, Neuromonics isn't really a treatment for hyperacusis, even says so on their website. Not that it can't help with sound sensitivity and it can be a part of exposure desensitization, and some audiologists do use it for hyperacusis, but it's not the best aproach in my opinion. Do you use pink noise?

That would be nice for you to go to the concert, but it really depends in what you're LDLs are right now and what level of ear protection you use, to know if it's a good idea or not.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #7 
Oh, yeah if music is a problem sound for ya, and you can't play it very loud on like your home stereo then a concert would likely be a bad idea. Desensitization needs to be done slowly.
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ProfNITSUD

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Reply with quote  #8 
I haven't done pink noise. I just use the Neuromonics and go a volume level up whenever I feel comfortable doing so. I don't know what the dBs are exactly, but I started at around volume 6 and now am able to listen to 10 so I thought that it was working for me. 

What do you suggest the best treatment is here?

And, is hyperacusis actually recoverable 100%? Or no, because it seems like some days I am pretty close to normal, while other day it's complete hell...

(I'm sorry if I sound rude, its just with the money I paid for this I am kind of worried, and the ups and downs are extremely discouraging.)
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ontario78

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Posts: 186
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
and, is hyperacusis actually recoverable 100%? Or no, because it seems like some days I am pretty close to normal, while other day it's complete hell...


That's a good question. It seems for some, total recovery is possible. I am up and down too. It's frustrating and discouraging at times.

One thing I have learned, is taking desensitization too quick will land you pretty quick in a setback. Recovering from H is a VERY long process from what I understand..however for a few, it comes and goes over mths..I was hoping to be so lucky!
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #10 
My opinion is that most people can completely recover from hyperacusis. I know of many who have. That doesn't mean that some don't have recurances later on but they are better able to recover again as they know how to help themselves or where to find help.

The pink noise helps linearize the ear and helps you tolerate sounds better when it's used properly. It's an important part of hyperacusis treatment and helps increase LDLs.

Though, treatment for decreased sound tolerance due to phonophobia/misophonia is different, and involves exposure desensitization. It's not easy to change beliefs about sound, it's a lot if work! And it does involve a lot of ups and downs often with changes in your emotional state.

So TRT is a combination of broadband noise generators and exposure desensitization along with directive counseling from a TRT trained clininian. Cognitive Behavior Therapy is VERY helpful too and many TRT providers use some CBT techniques in treating people. See TRT exercises at http://www.tinnitus.org

I never think of my ups and downs as setbacks. I know it's temporary ... And I keep focused on doing even more at a later date.

Getting your LDLs tested every month can help you monitor progress, by an audiologist who knows how to do it properly. My LDLs are pretty high now so I don't bother and just work at overcoming aversion to sounds which is my biggest problem ... with many sounds I can only listen for a period before they start to hurt (aversion).

Ears need practice with sounds (conditioned reflexes need practice), and exposure desensitization involves VERY gradually increasing the length of a sound exposure, number of sounds you exposure yourself to, and the frequency you expose yourself to sounds.

Basically it just means keep trying getting out in the world more as you can. It's all about relearning sounds. Music therapy is good exposure, and very helpful! Enjoyment and and distraction is helpful!

Treatment's not too complicated with the right help ... It can take time though I've taken some big steps forward in the past.

John
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