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Febrele

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Reply with quote  #1 
Is there anything we can do in this case?

Does pink noise can work when you hearing is fine?
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malo12

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Reply with quote  #2 
I think TRT (and thus pink noise) will work. I do not have significant hearing loss. However, I do have H. I am trying not to be too scared about noises.
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Febrele

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Reply with quote  #3 
I do not try to avoid sounds too much either, except when they can lead to setbacks or are really loud. I rarely wear my ear plugs.

But I still wonder if pink noise could help me gain more tolerance.
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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #4 
Pink noise, or a wide band noise like that used in the TRT wearable devices is usually helpful in treating hyperacusis, and it doesn't matter if you don't have hearing loss.

Exposing yourself to more sounds you tolerate well can only help. Seeking professional help from an experienced TRT doctor is a good idea, IMO.
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Febrele

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Reply with quote  #5 
But I already am exposing myself to sounds all day long... At work, in the bus... So I wonder when I would use pink sound? While I sleep?

Or is there a difference between being exposed to pink sound and everyday sounds? Maybe because pink sound as ALL frequencies?
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AudiologistJohnson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Actually to be precise, the use of pink noise is not part of the traditional hyperacusis treatment.  We use white noise, what is close to white noise, which is equal energy at all frequencies, or a very broad band of sound.

It sounds like a lovely waterfall or a river flowing.

The instruments made by General Hearing Instruments (the Tranquil) or by Amplisound (the Solace) are the units used for hyperacusis treatment in clinics by audiologists.

These are very well designed instruments that use sophisticated digital circuitry and are dependable and consistent. 

Both companies are wonderful and terrific support and staff and both Roger (GHI) and Ralph (Amplisound) are men of integrity and very kind.  Smart, too.

So, if you want to use the most common approach for helping yourself with hyperacusis, you might try finding some good white or broad band noise downloads, there are many free items out there in Internet Land.

Nature sound tapes or cds can be good, too, gentle and kind to your hearing and of course, you will want to use these at a comfortable level and build up your time to where you are listening to this as background sound for about 8 hours per day.  Just make this a part of your wardrobe and your regular habit and outfit and as you put on your glasses, put on your ears (iPod works pretty good!).

If you fall into the middle of the Bell curve, and most people do, happily, you will discover that in 6-12 months, your ears will be able to tolerate so much more and perhaps even approach normal again.  Now this does not happen for everyone, but for many, it is the normal pathway to recovery.

Thanks to Dr. Pawel Jastreboff, the creator of TRT and the intelligent observer along with Audiologist Susan Gold, who noted hyperacusis, reduced LDLs, and recovery using these devices.

MJ
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #7 

Actually to be precise, the use of pink noise is not part of the traditional hyperacusis treatment.  We use white noise, what is close to white noise, which is equal energy at all frequencies, or a very broad band of sound.  

 

In the interest of precision, Dr. Johnson, pink noise is broadband noise and the noise emitted by the wearable generators is also broadband noise.  In fact, the frequency range of the Network’s pink noise CD is considerably wider than any existing available presentation offered by GHI or Amplisound.  Additionally, the wearable generators do not emit equal energy at all frequencies.  That being said, one of the advantages of the wearable presentations, in my view, is that they provide bumps or increases in amplitude at specific frequencies which can be very advantageous for hyperacusics.  For my hyperacusis, I have worked with filtered pink noise – meaning that we purposely filtered the high-end so that I could tolerate the presentation and as my tolerance improved, we raised the high-end.  I also worked with a replica of the GHI NM presentation, which we also created in the studio using GHI's specifications as a guide, although the presentation I used is a little more ambitious on the high end because my tolerance continued to improve.  I am impressed with the GHI presentations and I have heard equally good things about Amplisound.     

 

So, if you want to use the most common approach for helping yourself with hyperacusis, you might try finding some good white or broad band noise downloads, there are many free items out there in Internet Land.

 

I strongly disagree with this suggestion.  Again, pink noise is broadband noise.  In addition, most hyperacusics cannot tolerate true white noise.   

 

Nature sound tapes or cds can be good, too, 

 

Very true.  There are some good ones out there.

 

Rob   

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AudiologistJohnson

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Reply with quote  #8 
Only 1 small contribution here, seems like when I post based on 14 years of full time clinical experience with T & H, there are often some comments, however, I would like to point out, that in those 14 years, I have encounted only a tiny handful of cases of hyperacusis where the use of broadband (formerly called white sound generators) sound generators could not be tolerated by the patient.  I cannot estimate for you precisely how many cases that might be, figure just half a dozen per month per year and you will have well over 800 cases or more, and that is a fact. 

So maybe 3-5 people, out of 800 plus, who found that the sound of the Solace or the Tranquil could not be tolerated....what does that tell you about probability? 

It is really a work of the heart to venture in here and try to contribute.

MJ
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #9 
Actually to be precise, the use of pink noise is not part of the traditional hyperacusis treatment.
 
Again, in the interest of precision, in an excellent book by Dr. Jack Vernon and Barbara Sanders called Tinnitus: Questions and Answers, when asked what an individual with hyperacusis could do to treat the condition, the authors wrote the following.  "He can try sound desensitization by wearing low-level, in -the-ear noise generators or by listening to a pink noise CD."  Pink noise is not part of hyperacusis treatment with TRT.
 
... in those 14 years, I have encounted only a tiny handful of cases of hyperacusis where the use of broadband (formerly called white sound generators) sound generators could not be tolerated by the patient.
 
That is excellent news for individuals with hyperacusis.  There is a way forward.   
 
We use white noise, what is close to white noise, which is equal energy at all frequencies, or a very broad band of sound. 
 
Equal energy at all frequencies and a very broad band of sound are two different things.  The wearable generators provide a broad band of noise.  The Network's pink noise CD also provides a broad band of noise.  Indeed, there are a number of sounds which provide a broad band.  However, the wearable generators do not provide "equal energy at all frequencies".  If they did, very few hyperacusics would be able to use them.  If you examine a readout of the broadband noise provided by the wearable generators, Dr. Johnson, you will find they do not provide equal energy at all frequencies - which is a good thing, because that is why the broadband noise presentations emitted by these excellent devices are easily tolerated by most hyperacusics.
 
Rob   
 

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