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Pamela

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #1 
Is there a connection between H and TMJ? I haven’t found anything definitive on the internet, but there seems to be a connection. My H was caused by music, however, I have TMJD and my H is worse on the side that my TMJD is worse on. My masseter muscle is swollen, and my SCM muscle is very tight, and I have forward head posture, so a lot of stuff is going on around the auditory area. When I clench my jaw, my H is worse. My TMJD doctor thinks an orthodontic splint might help (but I can’t do that until my posture improves). I’m seeing an ENT in February. Sound desensitization has helped only to a point. Thanks for any advice.

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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #2 
TMJ and jaw / tooth problems are cause of hyperacusis in a minority of people.  One person on here even had hyperacusis go away after having her wisdom teeth pulled!  If you have TMJ it would be a good idea to address it with a splint.  I developed bad TMJ disorder after getting hyperacusis (now pretty much resolved)- fixing it didn't change my hyperacusis though.

Once I had my jaw pop out of my socket for a moment when eating... and my hyperacusis went totally away for about a day.  I never figured that one out (my hyperacusis is noise induced I believe).  Coincidence???  I was not happy when it came back.  That did start about 6 months of TMJ hell though.
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Pamela

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado
TMJ and jaw / tooth problems are cause of hyperacusis in a minority of people.  One person on here even had hyperacusis go away after having her wisdom teeth pulled!  If you have TMJ it would be a good idea to address it with a splint.  I developed bad TMJ disorder after getting hyperacusis (now pretty much resolved)- fixing it didn't change my hyperacusis though.

Once I had my jaw pop out of my socket for a moment when eating... and my hyperacusis went totally away for about a day.  I never figured that one out (my hyperacusis is noise induced I believe).  Coincidence???  I was not happy when it came back.  That did start about 6 months of TMJ hell though.



Sorry to hear it came back [frown] thank you for the info!
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Margy

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Posts: 174
Reply with quote  #4 
There is a connection between TMJD and Hyperacusis. But it’s not well understood. There’s an article by Myriam Westcott on acoustic shock that mentions this connection.

It seems that the circumstances that cause Hyperacusis in some people can also cause TMJD. In my own experience, my jaw and neck muscles were extremely tight during the years that my Hyperacusis was also getting worse. Over time, I have been slowly able to get my muscles back mostly to normal, but my Hyperacusis is still a problem and still bothers my neck.

The Hyperacusis was due to a lot of noises coming on me during a time of pain and great tension, including dental work and jaw pain. The combination is what got me. The TMJD might be temporary. I would work on relaxing and massage and physical therapy.
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Pamela

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margy
There is a connection between TMJD and Hyperacusis. But it’s not well understood. There’s an article by Myriam Westcott on acoustic shock that mentions this connection.

It seems that the circumstances that cause Hyperacusis in some people can also cause TMJD. In my own experience, my jaw and neck muscles were extremely tight during the years that my Hyperacusis was also getting worse. Over time, I have been slowly able to get my muscles back mostly to normal, but my Hyperacusis is still a problem and still bothers my neck.

The Hyperacusis was due to a lot of noises coming on me during a time of pain and great tension, including dental work and jaw pain. The combination is what got me. The TMJD might be temporary. I would work on relaxing and massage and physical therapy.


Thank you for the information, this is very helpful!
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health

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Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #6 
icing my neck & bottom of skull, especially over night (with enough covering like a towel/fleece wrapped several times over ice pack to not get freezer burn) helps relieve everything more.  topicals like witch hazel, voltarin, diclofenac also help.  lying down, sleep important too.
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Pamela

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by health
icing my neck & bottom of skull, especially over night (with enough covering like a towel/fleece wrapped several times over ice pack to not get freezer burn) helps relieve everything more.  topicals like witch hazel, voltarin, diclofenac also help.  lying down, sleep important too.


Thank you!
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Kribu

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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #8 
It can definitely be related. (It can also be non-related, ie preexisting TMJ before hyperacusis-like my situation, but made worse after my injury).  This research paper : "An Integrative Model Accounting for the Symptom Cluster Triggered After an Acoustic Shock"  (apologies if I have been sharing this ad nauseum, but it's so important and new) https://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6156190  can tie it and more together for you.  In a nutshell (and my "gist") the trigeminal nerve (involved with the tensor tympani muscle, and stapedial muscle) also provides nerve connection to the "chewing muscles"--mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve.   Evolutionarily, they were connected.  Embryologically (sorry my words) they mature from the same area.   Head, neck, face, sinus, cerebral cortex, eyes....yup, all connected.
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Pamela

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kribu
It can definitely be related. (It can also be non-related, ie preexisting TMJ before hyperacusis-like my situation, but made worse after my injury).  This research paper : "An Integrative Model Accounting for the Symptom Cluster Triggered After an Acoustic Shock"  (apologies if I have been sharing this ad nauseum, but it's so important and new) https://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6156190  can tie it and more together for you.  In a nutshell (and my "gist") the trigeminal nerve (involved with the tensor tympani muscle, and stapedial muscle) also provides nerve connection to the "chewing muscles"--mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve.   Evolutionarily, they were connected.  Embryologically (sorry my words) they mature from the same area.   Head, neck, face, sinus, cerebral cortex, eyes....yup, all connected.


Thanks so much for this!
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