The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #1 
In addition to wearing my sound generators, I have been doing extra therapy where I listen to pink noise for 30 minutes a day.  I have been able to up the pink noise over time (fairly well) and now I am listening to it at 55 decibles.  I listen to pink noise at a low volume at work also.

 Unfortunately, so far I am still having a lot of trouble with engine noises, crowds of people etc.

How well does tolerance of pink noise correlate to tolerance of outside noises?  Like, when I a tolerate pink noise at 65 decibles, should I be able to tolerate noises of a bunch of people talking a lot better?

I am pretty tired of my ears getting sore from hearing engines, car horns, crowds, yelling kids etc.  I have had some unfortunate bad relapses out in public, and would like to be able to build up my tolerance "safely."  I have gotten a lot better, but my sound tolerances are still pretty poor in the real world.




0
Sadears

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #2 
Hey there Aplomado,

By no means am I an expert on this, but I would guess that the Pink Noise is not so much  used to correlate to outside environmental noise but to help brace your ears to become accustomed to constant sound. The frequency in which it uses is more gentle than white noise, and is similar to a real environmental noise or frequency like a waterfall, fan, rain, etc. In the pink noise pamphlet that's included with the CD from the network, it says to never have the pink noise at such a level that it blocks out the outside sound. You also never want it to be hostile- always have it at a sound that you can tolerate all the time. By leaving this on as much as possible, your ears and perhaps your auditory system subconsciously become used to the constant sound, as that is why it is used for Tinnitus; it cancels out the ringing with the constant noise. The goal of the Pink Noise treatment is to have the pink noise on at a tolerable volume while also being able to hear environmental sounds, as they are part of the "natural" world and in the end will help you develop more tolerance. I have read stories of people using other things to build tolerance like soft music or nature sounds. Hyperacusis recovery is a tricky journey..it's about turning your enemy into your ally; sound.

I hope this helped. Good luck to you, I hope you feel better soon.

-Adam
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #3 
I only do the "louder" pink noise for 30 minutes a day.  I play it on low volume at work, and wear my earpieces.

I am "hoping" that when I get where I don't mind the pink noise at louder volumes (65-70 db) my ears won't hurt so much in the real world...

Unfortunately, I have been become pretty phonophobic.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado
I only do the "louder" pink noise for 30 minutes a day.  I play it on low volume at work, and wear my earpieces.

I am "hoping" that when I get where I don't mind the pink noise at louder volumes (65-70 db) my ears won't hurt so much in the real world...

Unfortunately, I have been become pretty phonophobic.


Aplomado, playing the pink noise that loud is not helpful. Desensitization is a lot more than pink noise or ear devices. I understand what you are trying to do, but that is not the way to go. Have you had your LDL's testing recently? Do you know what they are?
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #5 

No, I haven't had them tested recently.  My ears hurt every day though, so I know I am not cured.


The first time I was cured of hyperacusis, I followed a similar protocol, though with water noise instead.  For this reason, I don't think this is harmful.


0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado

No, I haven't had them tested recently.  My ears hurt every day though, so I know I am not cured.


The first time I was cured of hyperacusis, I followed a similar protocol, though with water noise instead.  For this reason, I don't think this is harmful.




You can have LDL's of 100dB, that is normal LDLs, and still be in pain with normal everyday sounds. It is due to misophonia ... Treatment for that is different, and pink noise won't fix misophonia ... though it can be part of treatment. I know people have commented on the message board that they have Notmal LDLs but still don't feel any better.

I didn't say it is harmful, just not helpful in my opinion. But if you feel it helps I won't argue with you.
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #7 

Hello John,

Thanks for your thoughts.  While I am sure I have hyperacusis, I don't know to what extent my phonophobia is making the problem worse.  Do you have any suggestions?

0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado

Hello John,

Thanks for your thoughts.  While I am sure I have hyperacusis, I don't know to what extent my phonophobia is making the problem worse.  Do you have any suggestions?



I'd just suggest listening to music a period everyday. Also listen more to loud sounds that you can tolerate well, that don't cause pain.

Have you done TRT? If not, that's the place to start. Hard to suggest too much without knowing your LDLs ...

Just very gradually put more sound in your world.
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #9 
I have been doing TRT for about 3 years.

It worked beautifully at first- "cured" me in 6 months.  Bagpipes gave me a relapse.  In a few months I was mostly better again.  A car horn in my ear relapsed me again.  I worked back up again, then had another relapse.  I've been struggling for about a a year and half since.  While I have improved a lot, I'm still pretty poor and my ears hurt a lot.
0
Rob

Registered:
Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #10 
Aplomado -

I'm sorry you are having a rough time. 

Have you contacted your therapist about your relapses?  

Rob 
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #11 
Yes, she doesn't know what do.  Apparently I am the only one of her patients that have had relapses.  It worked really well at first.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplomado
Yes, she doesn't know what do.  Apparently I am the only one of her patients that have had relapses.  It worked really well at first.


Aplomado,
Do you know what caused your hyperacusis at first?

Lots of people have setbacks/relapses. I used to have them a lot, some big ones.

There are lots of things you can do, but it is hard to give advice without knowing what's causing your sensitivity ...

Like, do you have aversion to some sounds? If you can listen to a sound for a period of time before experiencing discomfort or pain, then it is aversion, not hyperacusis.

Can drive okay? If you where to get in the car and take a 4 - 6 hour drive, and listen to the car stereo, what would happen?

I'm not suggesting you do that yet, but it is something Jastreboff has suggested to his patients that can do that.

Are there quiet sounds that cause you problems?
0
Aplomado

Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #13 
I got hyperacusis from a gunshot noise.

Well, I hate car horns and bagpipes with a holy passion.  I don't tolerate music well.

No I can't drive with the stereo on.  I drive with cut down musicians earplugs.  I only started wearing them because I was terrified of car horns when driving.  Unfortunately, then I senstized to engine noise, which I wasn't before.  Big mistake.  I want to wean myself off them, but when I try my ears start hurting and my hyperacusis spikes.  I don't know what to do.

Quiet sounds don't generally cause me problems unless my ears are feeling sore.

I'm trying to build up my sound tolerance via sound therapy (trt, pink noise), but it is not going as well as I would like.

I am so sick of this.
0
Johnloudb

Registered:
Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #14 
Hi, when getting off ear protection tinnitus will get worse and ears will be more sensitive at times, that's where cognitive behavior therapy and mindfulness come in. You just have to do it gradually. You don't have have to start with the car ... What about nature walks? Music listening? The more sound you are habituated to the stronger your ears will be. Learn about exposure desensization and CBT and mindfulness.

Yeah, I know it is frustrating and difficult ... Takes time.

Just really busy right now with school, but have more to say.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.