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geg1992

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #1 
Am I right in thinking a lot of H is as a result of hearing loss meaning that the brain tries to over amplify sounds to make up for this?

If this is the case, how is it possible to reduce sensitivity? As hearing losss will always be there, and get worse, so surely he brain will always over amplify sounds?

Do I just avoid wearing ear plugs at any time over 85db? My tolerancd seems to be about 60-65db with higher pitched sounds and seems to be getting worse by the day. I don't know what to do.

Thanks
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Rob

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Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #2 
Hyperacusis has nothing whatsoever to do with hearing loss.  You can have great hearing and still have hyperacusis.

Reducing sensitivity to sound is absolutely doable.   

I suggest you get some professional help with this.  Also, try not to take seriously a lot of what you read on the Internet about hyperacusis.     

Rob
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geg1992

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #3 
That's great, thanks rob!

Do most people improve? And do quite a lot of people get rid of it completely?

Mines come out of the blue, 3 months after noise exposure and tinnitus from a loud concert.

Thanks.
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Rob

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Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #4 
Many people who get into desensitization therapy to treat hyperacusis improve. 

Sometimes, mild to moderate hyperacusis accompanies tinnitus - and it can resolve over time.

Rob
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Aplomado

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Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #5 
"Recruitment" is associated with hearing loss.... it's not quite the same as hyperacusis.  

http://hyperacusis.net/hyperacusis/hyperacusis+or+recruitment/default.asp
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StringBean

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #6 
People who defeat hyperacusis do so by listening to pink noise all day every day for at least 12 months.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy is the only way to fix hyperacusis. There is no surgery, no pill. You must re-train your brain to accept sound. This takes continuous pink noise for at least 12 months.

I did it for 15 months and I am 95% cured. If you want an easy answer, there is none. If you want to slay the dragon that haunts you, this is what it takes.

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Aplomado

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Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #7 
Stringbean is right.

It doesn't always take a year.  My dr said her average patient takes six months.

I'm a really bad patient though!
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Tram

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #8 
You don't need to do TRT or pink noise for 12 months continuously. You should definitely do it as much as you're comfortable with, because it can help you get back out into the world and start slowly increasing your tolerance to sound. But if, like me five-six years ago, you don't have health insurance and can't afford to go to a doctor, take comfort in the fact that you can do it on your own, without listening to pink noise all day (which is pretty disruptive, though far less disruptive than hyperacusis, obviously), since the severity of tinnitus and hyperacusis is so intimately related with your mental health, mood, and outlook.

Don't force yourself to jump right back to normalcy, but don't coddle yourself either. I set myself and my music back several years by wearing earplugs all the time. One day, I said f*ck it, I'm gonna force myself to go to band practice and concerts and class and everything else. It was brutal at times, but I listened to the pink noise cd for 30 mins to an hour every day, which was as much as I had time for, and that really helped. Filling my life with new, often scary-but-positive opportunities, and retraining my automatic negative thoughts about certain situations, got me to 90 percent normal. When I graduated college, moved into my own apartment, finished my band's full-length album, and finally got a job w/ health insurance that allowed me to go to therapy and receive medication, I hammered the nail into my hyperacusis (which used to hammer nails into me) for good.

I've gone from constant earplug usage and startling at the sound of a fork clinking on a plate in another room (and the attendant depression & suicidal thoughts), to no hyperacusis at all and tinnitus that is only noticeable at night or if I try hard to focus on it. I've gone from listening to music on the lowest possible setting to playing it loud enough that my girlfriend, who has no hearing damage whatsoever, has to ask me to turn it down. I still protect my ears at concerts and loud movies, but if I forget my earplugs when going to a bar, I no longer cancel my plans.

Hang in there. You can totally do it.

__________________
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@TramMcDooley
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Tram

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #9 
Haha I realize I wrote "don't force yourself..." and then in the next sentence said "I forced myself..." What I mean is that I'd taken small steps forward over several years, w/ intermittent improvements, until I got impatient and started taking much larger steps. I had like ten times the improvement in 1/3 the time after making that decision and doing it. In retrospect it seems so much easier than it actually was. But that's good news, b/c it means you can move on w/ your life. If you have the means and the time to do full-on TRT w/ a specialist, though, do it.
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@TramMcDooley
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chuff

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #10 
Tram,do you have any hearing loss? I lost all hearing in my left ear in 2013 and I have tinnitus and hyperacusis. I used to play in musical groups but I am not able to do that now. I know this because I have tried. My motivation to deal with hyperacusis was music.

For several months I wore earplugs (in my case, just one) everywhere. I taped my dog's tags together so I would not have to hear them clinking against each other. But then I began to force myself to allow sound back in my life. I just kept pushing past my comfort zone a little each day. The good news is that I can stand to go to birthday parties now, and restaurants,grocery stores,etc. I do experience some discomfort in these settings though and I often cannot hear well.
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saab1216

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Posts: 400
Reply with quote  #11 
Tram, same thing here. I took bigger and bigger steps and slayred the dragon too. You can see my posts here from 2009. It was a time when simply chewing food was painfully loud to me. Now Im feeling 99 percent. I just dont go to loud events so, cant tell if Im 100 percent yet. I put my guitars away for good too.
Your story is inspirational to those who are new to this. Its just the  thing we all need to hear. There's too much negativity everywhere else online. Hyperacusis can be beat but it ever so slowly it fades away. The problem is that most people give up because of the pain you must endure whle using good sound exposure. . Just like exercise..it can be painful but the rewards are worth it huh?.  Anyway take care   
                                                                                                                                                   Paul
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