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ariel

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,

So, I travelled Yesterday for a conference in Prague, and...

The conference hotel is awfully too noisy for me [frown]

There place is surrounded by roads, and for sure the windows do not block the noise. Also, I can here footsteps (and other actions) from the nearby rooms.

Of course I asked to change a room. They just suggested a different room with roughly the same noise level.

What would you do? How can you tell a hotel would be quite enough?

Ariel



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Margy

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Posts: 175
Reply with quote  #2 
I would use earplugs, which you can buy. Next time, I would also take along some noise canceling headphones. In a hotel, I use the headphones when I’m awake and need to shut out noises like air conditioning. Then I use the earplugs to help me sleep. I cut them to make them shorter so they do not feel bad on my pillow.
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bananacupcakes

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #3 
It will never cease to amaze me how the little things no one else thinks twice about rule over our lives. Also amazing at how messed up our ears can get. There's no end to this, right?

Anyway, I had the misfortune of being placed in a noisy hotel room back in December. The AC was too loud, for one. I could also hear the footsteps in the room above, also the bang of the closet door in the room either side. I could hear the honk of vehicles from the road below. The management was gracious enough to present three other rooms to me. I picked the least noisy one, but even that wasn't quiet enough me in spite of the fact that I was wearing ear plugs for most of the time, and earmuffs for a bit. It was a miserable stay. It is a miserable life.
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ariel

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Reply with quote  #4 
I am in Prague... graciousness is not a common trait here. A different room was offered to me after insisting... but it wasn't any better.

I carry noise cancelling headphones as well as earplug with me basically everywhere. They help, sometimes. However, I cannot use any of them for a long period (more than an hour) without getting an headache. None of them is able to mask footsteps and "hitting" noise.

It is the first time such thing happens to me. I am not sure what change. Did I become more sensitive or this hotel is more is more noisy than the average?

As for the miserableness... I guess you are right. I hope you are wrong.


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ariel

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #5 
What I really really want is actually a Hyperacusis oriented review sites for hotels (like tripadvisor). I want to know if the place is quite before I find myself in it.


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bananacupcakes

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #6 
I've found that we can't really rely on anyone but ourselves. That means you wear ear protection or leave the place causing you pain.

The hotel can move you to other rooms, but they won't understand how loud the noise is because they don't have hyperacusis. But it really isn't their fault. Most likely, they think the new room they're offering you is quiet enough (and I bet that it is quiet enough for normal ears). And because hyperacusis is invisible, they don't have any indication that you're truly suffering. Even if you cry and break down in pain, they'll just think you're a prissy overacting diva, or a totally crazy lunatic.

Other disabilities can be accommodated but it's next to impossible to accommodate hyperacusis simply because sound is everywhere like air.

It's for this reason why most hyperacusis sufferers choose to live isolated lives. For now, it's the best solution for improving the pain.
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rodmccain

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Posts: 214
Reply with quote  #7 
I wish you all the very best, and I don't want to come across as bitter, or making light of your issues,  but you are fortunate, even though you are faced with some challenges and some discomfort, to be able to travel and engage in life.  Keep your mind focused on all of the activities you CAN DO.  There are people that are just about housebound.....literally. 

I do believe that it will get better for you!!

God bless,
Kathy Mccain
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bananacupcakes

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
What I really really want is actually a Hyperacusis oriented review sites for hotels (like tripadvisor). I want to know if the place is quite before I find myself in it.

This is going to be a challenge. First, very few people have hyperacusis compared to the rest of the general population so there won't be enough data for such a site or app. Second, a significant number of H sufferers can't travel and are housebound, so they have no need for travel guides. Three, what's quiet for people with healthy ears may not be quiet for us, so their advice will not help.

The best you can do is go to a place and check it out yourself, but make sure to have an escape plan if it's too much for your ears. Don't force yourself to endure it because you're going to risk worsening.
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ariel

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #9 
bananacupcakes, I suspect you are wrong about the prevalence of hyperacusis.

I spent some time reading a book about hyperacusis by Baguely and Andersson-

https://www.amazon.com/Hyperacusis-David-Baguely-Gerhard-Andersson/dp/1597561045 

Luckily, I was able to access it for free using the academic library subscription of my university.

It seems that hyperacusis is pretty common- 5-10% of the population, depends of the definition and the survey. However, I also wonder, where are all the others? I guess many people live with some intolerance for noise, and just consider themselves as "spoiled" or crazy. This is basically how I considered myself for a long period (7-8 years), until the tinnitus started and I read about H while reading about T.

If there are so many people, or at even a fraction of this amount... we can build some network.


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cactus

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Posts: 87
Reply with quote  #10 

The more you stay away from ordinary noises, the worse your symptoms will get in the long run. I can understand that it is tempting to retreat to quiet rooms and wear earplugs, but this will only make your auditory system more sensitive.

Try to live your life, embrace sound, and not let this define you. I know how difficult it is, and I know all too well that feeling of anxiety lingering in the back of your head each and every day in anticipation of all the unexpected and bothersome noises that you might face.  But the more you give into that, the worse it will get (both the symptoms as well as the anxiety).

The world will not change to accommodate our needs, so we will have to change to it. Use high quality earplugs in case you are around sounds which reach actually damaging levels. There is no shame in doing so and earplugs are getting more and more common at loud events, as many people nowadays have some issues with the hearing (tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss etc.- It's surprisingly common, especially in the age of constant headphone use and loud entertainment. )

But don't shy away from normal noises such as those in a hotel, try not to isolate yourself from daily life, as this becomes a self-perpetuating road.  

 

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ariel

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #11 

"
The more you stay away from ordinary noises, the worse your symptoms will get in the long run
"

I heard this claim more than once. Can you trace it to some research?

As I read more and more, I get the feeling there are multiple "beliefs" in the field, and only few notions which are evidence based.

For years I tried to "live" with the noise. I think it only made things worse from the psychological point of you. I was miserable . Physically, I tend to believe this avoidance of the problem was simply meaningless. It did not lead to any improvement, but did not cause any deterioration.
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cactus

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Posts: 87
Reply with quote  #12 

This field of research into hyperacusis treatment was pioneered by Jastreboff, Hazel and Sheldrake, who also were the first to develop the well known TRT therapy, that uses ear level noise generators to aid the desensitization process. 

Although subsequent research results do not always agree on the exact details of treatment of hyperacusis, almost all of them have the common conclusion that in order for the auditory system to desensitize, it should be exposed to sound (within normal limits) rather than keeping away from sound.

A random placebo-controlled trial study can be found here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4906300/ which concludes, like many other studies, that the best results are obtained by using broadband noise as well as counseling to help the patient understand that he or she should not keep away from every-day sounds.

There are many studies like this and also many success stories on this website and elsewhere online. Although details differ, they all revolve around the following:
- desensitize the auditory system by continuing to expose yourself to (safe levels of) sound, including broadband noise, music and everyday sounds.
- protect your hearing by using earplugs but only do so when sound levels are actually dangerous. Try to avoid using earplugs in everyday situations.
- work slowly but consistently and structured towards sound exposure to increase your tolerances
- keep your anxiety under control, be careful but not fearful, engage in life and don't let your symptoms control it.

Progress really is possible. I wish you all the best.

 

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