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rodmccain

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Posts: 225
Reply with quote  #1 
Friends, My wife suffers from Hyperacusis and Category 4 Tinnitus.  In January she will be having laproscopic colon surgery that will take about 2-3 hours to complete. The Question is:
Should she use hearing protection during the surgery?
Does anyone have any experience with having to have surgery while dealing with Hyperacusis and/or Tinnitus?

Any input would be greatly appreciated,   she is having a immense amount of anxiety about what to do and what setbacks might occur.
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #2 
Rod -

Your wife should address these questions with her doctor.  That may help her feel less stress about the surgery. 

Rob 
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brianbrain

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Reply with quote  #3 
Rod,

Your wife should consult with her neurologist and the surgeon either together or have the neurologist speak with the surgeon.  The surgeon doesn't work on the brain but the gut and would not have knowledge about brain issues.

Even when knocked out a person with Hyperacusis needs to be protected during surgery.  It is no difference than if a person went into surgery and had their eyes taped open looking at the lights in the OR.  Even eyes are taped shut during most surgery's yet the ears (the auditory nerves) are never protected as must MDs don't understand about Hyperacusis.

When I had my TBI I was already in agony with Hyperacusis before my brain surgery and the MD who did the surgery did nothing to protect my ears (auditory nerves).  Picture having Hyperacusis and having your skull drilled on right above your ear during surgery that lasted 4 1/2 hours.  Imagine walking up with what my Hyperacusis was after.

Even MD's will say it won't hurt because you are unconscious, but it would be no different than if while knocked out your hand received 3rd degree burns.  It wouldn't hurt when you were unconscious but it would when you wake up. 

Even then there is pain medicine for someone with an injury from the neck down inside and out but their is nothing for pain for Hyperacusis.

Contact your wife's Hyperacusis MD first and foremost. 

Brian

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #4 
Even when knocked out a person with Hyperacusis needs to be protected during surgery.

That depends on the type of surgery, no?  If a procedure is performed that doesn't exceed the person's sound tolerance, wearing hearing protection is unnecessary.  

Rob




 
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brianbrain

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #5 

"That depends on the type of surgery, no?  If a procedure is performed that doesn't exceed the person's sound tolerance, wearing hearing protection is unnecessary". 

Rob,

If that was the case seat belts are unnecessary then by extension.  It depends on what type of car accident one has before using a seat belt. 

All it takes is one dropped instrument on the floor to set back a Hyperacusis sufferer for days, weeks or longer.  What if the whole tray fell to the floor?  Plus every surgery has a lot of noise; it's the nature of the beast.

Think of this, the gowns and masks everyone wears in the OR.  For me they sound no different than a rustling newspaper or the sound of the plastic bags with candy in them at the movie.  All it takes is one second to undue years of rehabilitation, can you imaging hour after hour of noise to an unprotected ear?

There are quite a few surgeons who play music during the procedure itself.  There is also the conversation themselves between the Gas Passers and the Nurses also, plus the noise of the OR itself.  If the room has a tall ceiling that affects a majority of Hyperacusis sufferers in any situation. 

Even a normal hearing person who listens to 2-8 hours or more of surgery might have ringing in their ears after the procedure.  Unconscious patients can’t react to a potential hazard the way a conscious person can.  The other night I watched an old 30 Rock episode and a klieg was falling to the ground and Liz Lemon (Tina Fey) looked away and covered her ears.  An unconscious person can’t protect themselves when that occurs, just as a person who is sleeping can’t.  The sleeping person will react and try and prevent the noise from happening again, whereas an unconscious person can’t.      

Better safe than sorry.

Brian

 

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #6 
Better safe that sorry.

The way I see it, it is better to be informed.

Rob 
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rodmccain

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Posts: 225
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks folks for your input! 
Kathy - just wanted to add that she currently has to use ear plugs for CT Scans, Mammograms, and Xrays.  These sounds are too loud and seem very distorted.

Any advice on specific hearing protection or type of ear plugs?
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Paulbe

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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #8 
I have worked in theatres, Recovery and ICU.  The procedure itself is irrelevant, its the noise the people around you make when you are knocked out.  The clanking of metal trays and implements, the unnecessary chatter, the loud talking and giggling, the scraping of things across the floor, the banging of things into other things etc etc.  They think the whole human machine shuts down, including hearing.  They are (generalizing here) quite thoughtless and insensitive on the whole in these environments.  Years of experience has shown me this.  She should plug her ears, and you both should make it known firmly that she requires considerate management of unneeded noise.  It can be done if they know.
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