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chuff

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Reply with quote  #1 
I lost all hearing in my left ear....sudden sensorineural loss. Hearing in my right ear is normal. Every sound I hear in my good ear (clock ticking,bird chirping,etc) causes a sort of feedback in my bad ear which I can also feel. I have been learning to live with this for about a year and a half now. Essentially, I hear everything twice....once as sound and once as noise. Just wondering if others experience this also.
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AnthonyO

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Reply with quote  #2 
What I can say is this, when hyperacusis was coming onto me in Summer of '13, one day at church, one of the singers (female) came up to my right side and began speaking to me, softly, not even loudly and lo & behold, I started to hear that very same thing, an echo in my left ear...it wasn't her voice that I heard double in my left ear, but sort of a "response" to that sound...and I heard is a micro few milliseconds later...almost immediate. Odd, very odd.  I don't hear that much anymore, since hyperacusis came on full in Fall of '13.  Oh, BTW, I do not have hearing loss in any of my ears.
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #3 
Chuff, do you have hyperacusis?
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chuff

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Reply with quote  #4 
The audiologist called it hyperacusis but my situation seems different from what others describe here. I don't react to a certain range of sounds. I react to ALL sounds. I have profound hearing loss in my left ear,constant tinnitus and ear fullness, and this disturbing reaction to all sound. This has gone on for 20 months now. My right ear works just fine but the noise in my left ear competes.
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #5 
Is the sound "louder" or painful?  Just trying to find out if it is really hyperacusis.  I have not heard of your symptoms before.
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chuff

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Reply with quote  #6 
It is not an intense pain, more of a constantly uncomfortable hot sensation. It's like a fire is burning all of the time. There is some sound going on always, like the sound of a furnace or a sizzling pan. On top of this, when I hear my own voice in my good ear, I also hear a buzzing in my deaf ear. Syllable for syllable, this what I hear. Every foostep, every clap, etc.

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briann

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Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Chuff,

It does sound like you have hyperacusis. In your case, it seems the damage was isolated to one side which resulted in hyperactivity on that path. Given all of the crossing from left to right and right to left in the auditory system I guess it's not too shocking that this sort of thing can happen. It sounds like the sound-induced tinnitus that some people have is being triggered by sound on the opposite side. You may want to go on hearing loss forums and look up people with sudden hearing loss. I did a quick search and the first one I found had some symptoms similar to yours, although she had a little bit of hearing left in her bad ear so that was the dominant source. 

http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/community/forums/deafness-and-hearing-loss.aspx?g=search

I have a few questions. I hope there are not too many,
  1. Does any of this discomfort ever present itself in your good ear?
  2. When did burning and feeling sound in you bad ear from your good ear develop?
  3. When you first had your sudden hearing loss, did you experience these sensations? Did you experience vertigo?
  4. You initially said you feel the sound in your bad ear that is coming to your good ear. Is this the burning you are talking about or something else? 
  5. Does protecting your bad ear prevent any of the burning or buzzing symptoms? It might take a few days of wearing an earplug in the bad ear to see if that helps with the burning. Just an experiment.
A note on burning. From what i've read, burning is a common sensation after amputees have surgery. They can experience a burning sensation for quite a while due to pain receptors being severed although for most of them I believe it goes away in time. 

-Brian
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chuff

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #8 
Briann
I had serious vertigo at onset. The pain is not present in my good ear. I had some of these feedback issues right away but they increased after steroid treatment, which was about a month after onset. Wearing an earplug in my good ear does decrease the noise and discomfort that I experience in my bad ear somewhat. An earplug was an important part of my survival kit for many months, but I try to include more sound in my life now. I am hoping to desensitize. ENT made comparison to phantom limb syndrome.
Thank you for suggesting hearing loss forums. I will check things out.
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briann

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Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #9 
I see. Are you 100% certain that sound entering your bad ear is not also contributing to any of these symptoms? I understand plugging the good ear helps but wondering if plugging the bad ear also helps. I'm trying to understand why the steroids would have made it worse if they were only injected in the bad ear.

I think desensitization is definitely worth trying. Hopefully soon we will have progress with tinnitus medication that can also help.

Brian
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chuff

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Reply with quote  #10 
Briann

Sound is introduced in my right ear only. I react negatively in my deaf, left ear to the sound that is introduced in my hearing, right ear. I know this is so because it happens when I speak or listen on the phone. I did try using earplugs in both ears initially, but I discovered that the plug in my left ear made no difference.
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #11 
The doubling effect is called diplacusis. 

That may be what you are describing.

Rob
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briann

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Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #12 
Found this to be somewhat relevant so i'll post here. Cochlear implants in cases of unilateral hearing loss shown to reduce tinnitus and hyperacusis symptoms in qualified patients. Seems like a reasonable idea for intolerable tinnitus and hyperacusis triggered by severe, unilateral hearing loss. Don't see it as a useful solution otherwise though. 

Cochlear Implants as a Treatment Option for Unilateral Hearing Loss, Severe Tinnitus and Hyperacusis 

http://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/380750

5/7 showed significant improvement in sound tolerance. 1/7 showed significantly worse sound tolerance. 1/7 got just slightly better. Looks like report will be updated in the future when more patients have had their 12 month follow up.

Screen Shot 2015-05-29 at 11.33.24 AM.jpg 

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