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BriGuy

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

I’m new(ish) to the forum and have been dealing with T and H for 14 years. I’ve seen about 4 different ENTs and have been given different diagnoses. The most common one is atypical menieres. I do not have vertigo, but do get dizziness as if I were on a boat. I have hearing loss in my right heat at high frequencies as well.

My sound tolerance has gotten worse and I’m now coming to the conclusion as to how much this is affecting my life. I’m an extremely outgoing individual that has become an introvert out of necessity. I am 34 and I avoid concerts, bars, etc. and have for many years. I cringe at the thought of loud noises and would rather avoid the long amount of pain, anxiety, and sensitivity that come with such exposure.

When I found out Dr. Jastreboff was somewhat close to where I live, I got very excited! Turns out the costs are quite high to see him and I am trying to determine if I should. I do not doubt his expertise, he is obviously an industry leader in T and H, but it is very unclear to me how much it will cost. That said, I do understand that costs depend on what is required. Additionally, TRT is very specialized, which probably attributes to the cost. I am wondering if anyone has seen him and can talk to their experience and results. I am leaning toward working with him, but just want to do my research. I’ve also started my own pink noise therapy per hearing success stories from this site :).

If no one can talk to his work, the are there any other Doctors in the Washington, DC area that you recommend?

Any feedback is much appreciated!
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Lazyboy63

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi I’m new to all this but Jastreboff’s name and work seem to be quite important in the field of hyperacusis and tinnitus rehabilitation.

Perhaps see him at least for an intital consultation to get a feel for how he can help your particular condition and take it from there.




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contrast

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Before making this post I understand I am in the unpopular minority of people who don't trust Professor Jastreboff's treatment for all cases of hyperacusis. It's only fair that we allow the controversy about TRT to be public instead of having a biased community centric around the TRT model.


I consider TRT to be a monopoly in the field, not because of Jastreboff himself or conspiracy theory but because hyperacusis is rare and pain hyperacusis is even rarer and due to these condition being rare they do not get much clinical attention and Jastreboff just happens to be the only game in town with some evidence he can help. The monopoly on TRT is completely centric to lack of academic research on hyperacusis. Once more research happens TRT will either be limited or obsolete. 

I believe Jastreboff's treatment to an extent is dogmatic and needs to be challenged by respectable scientist who study the mechanisms of hyperacusis, and a damaged cochlea. There isn't enough research to see how TRT fairs for hyperacusis defined as "noise induced pain.

According to a Ph.D Otologist, Charles Liberman, Hyperacusis defined as noises sounding too loud is not the same thing as hyperacusis with pain and TRT probably won't help.
source:
   https://web.archive.org/web/20150906013331/http://deafness.about.com/od/Sound-Sensitivity/fl/A-Step-Forward-in-Understanding-Hyperacusis-with-Pain.htm


No one challenges the status quo, why is this?


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contrast

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazyboy63
Hi I’m new to all this but Jastreboff’s name and work seem to be quite important in the field of hyperacusis and tinnitus rehabilitation.

Perhaps see him at least for an intital consultation to get a feel for how he can help your particular condition and take it from there.






I am begging you to look at the full picture regarding TRT. Jastreboff may not be the answer.


You are free to make up your own mind, but I encourage you to watch Mr. Pollard speech on hyperacusis and how the clinical treatments are failing.

I personally believe the whole concept of desensitizing noise induced pain through sound therapy is flawed.

It helps the same reason massage therapy helps peripheral neuropathy but it isn't a cure or even effective treatment.

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YellowFlowers

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Reply with quote  #5 
Jastreboff really isn't being held to a high regard anymore in the tinnitus and hyperacusis field. TRT is usually being looked down on by many researchers, instead they focus on CBT. 
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contrast

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Reply with quote  #6 
Why not focus on regenerating cochlear nerve fibers, cochlear synapses and sensory hair cells like these guys?
https://www.masseyeandear.org/research/otolaryngology/investigators/laboratories/eaton-peabody-laboratories

We need to be pro-science and have a progressive mindset if we want to see a cure for pain hyperacusis.

Pallative medicine holds back bio-medical research and has monopoly like tendencies.

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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #7 
Sound desensitization has helped many improve with hyperacusis. It is effective for a subset of patients and is a good treatment for them. The challenge is to better subclassify hyperacusis patients into those who will likely respond to sound therapy, versus those who may need other approaches. I think that research is en route, it just takes time and funding. NIH is notorious for poorly funding rare conditions such as this. We are not alone in this battle for the coin. It may require a crowd funding approach, like what has been successful in ME/CFS (another cruelly neglected illness).

Stem cell therapy to regenerate hair cells would be great if that was the actual pathology. For many of us, I don’t believe it is. Again, we need to understand the condition better.

To the original poster - I see very little downside to being evaluated by Dr. J. I think it would be helpful information and evaluation, regardless of whether you decide to pursue further treatment.

Best,
EDogg
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DanMalcore

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Jastreboff really isn't being held to a high regard anymore in the tinnitus and hyperacusis field. TRT is usually being looked down on by many researchers, instead they focus on CBT. 


Always frustrating when statements like this are made.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can be helpful but TRT by and large is the path to dramatically improving decreased sound tolerance.  Those who are critical of TRT by and large come from a camp who never did it, never completed it under the guidance of a qualified clinician and have never read Pawel Jastreboffs or David Baguleys books.  Is TRT costly - yes.  But how much is it worth for you to get your life back and live in the mainstream of life and being able to provide for your family.

Bryan Pollard's website never even mentions TRT which is a huge disservice to patients desperate to recover.  This message board has been a forum to discuss all forms of treatment.  TRT is by far the most effective.  It is so discouraging when some individuals try to divert people to alternative treatments that do not work.

Again, the best approach is to make an appointment with a clinician who is qualified to diagnose and treat hyperacusis.

Dan



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Aplomado

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Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast

According to a Ph.D Otologist, Charles Liberman, Hyperacusis defined as noises sounding too loud is not the same thing as hyperacusis with pain and TRT probably won't help.



TRT / Sound therapy makes my pain go down / go away.  Charles Liberman's statement is does not describe my experience at all.
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contrast

I personally believe the whole concept of desensitizing noise induced pain through sound therapy is flawed.


Well, true, it may be flawed in that it doesn't work for everybody apparently, and is far from perfect, but it is the only thing I have found that makes my ears stop hurting!  
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DanMalcore

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Quote:
According to a Ph.D Otologist, Charles Liberman, Hyperacusis defined as noises sounding too loud is not the same thing as hyperacusis with pain and TRT probably won't help...I personally believe the whole concept of desensitizing noise induced pain through sound therapy is flawed. 


From my own personal experience and that of many others that is totally and completely FALSE.  'Probably' is your wrongful misguided suggestion and you are one of the reasons message boards get a bad reputation and often qualified clinicians discourage new hyperacusis patients from visiting one.  Please stop this.  I and many others with pain have done TRT and all have improved greatly.  

Dan

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contrast

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Reply with quote  #12 
I'm glad TRT helped you,  I am just waiting to see what further research has to say about hyperacusis. Strories on the internet regarding hyperacusis filled with mixed results. Some people just don't get better with it. We just need more research.
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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanMalcore


TRT is by far the most effective.  It is so discouraging when some individuals try to divert people to alternative treatments that do not work.

Again, the best approach is to make an appointment with a clinician who is qualified to diagnose and treat hyperacusis.

Dan



We need to find out what aspect of TRT is the most effective. Such as Pink noise therapy.

Due to people complaining about the cost of TRT we need to brainstorm.  Can't speakers and headphones one has replace white noise/pink noise machines?  There's plenty of videos on the Internet of Pink Noise and resources to mask one can play through their own speakers, phone and TV.  An audiologist can still guide a patient through the process of course.

Then TRT can be modernized and will still help people who will benefit from it.


We obviously hold disagreements, we can keep respectful about it.



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Rob

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In the clip posted earlier in this thread, Mr. Pollard says his “agenda is to talk about the patient’s reality … and the patient’s future.”  He describes the experience of a fictional patient “developed from the hundreds of real stories” he has heard.  Mr. Pollard’s representational patient has not been helped by TRT, experiences ear pain independent of sound, indicates no audiologist ever “mentioned the risk of sound at 70 dB or above”, and is more knowledgeable about the latest hyperacusis research than his clinician.  

I see the hyperacusis patient's reality and future differently than Mr. Pollard.  TRT and other forms of broadband noise therapy is not helpful to all hyperacusis patients, but it is extremely helpful to many as part of a strategy to manage hyperacusis. 

Some patients experience ear pain independent of sound, but many do not. 

Exposure to 70 dB can be uncomfortable or painful to a hyperacusic, but exposure to sound at 70 dB is not dangerous to one’s auditory health.  Hyperacusics are not “more at risk” for auditory damage than non-hyperacusics with regard to exposure to sound.  

Patients are not more knowledgeable about hyperacusis than a hearing healthcare clinician experienced in diagnosing and treating patients with hyperacusis.
  

Effective management strategies already exist to treat the knifelike pain Mr. Pollard describes in his presentation, and it is not necessary to wait for hearing scientists to determine the likely mechanisms before this form of decreased sound tolerance can be effectively treated.

Rob 

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contrast

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thanks for everyone's feedback in defense of TRT and  Dr. Jastreboff's model. I will of course keep an open mind to the feed back everyone here is giving me and try to shy away from my earlier views of being in dogmatic opposition to TRT.

The way I see things is that massage therapy can help peripheral neuropathy the same reason TRT can help pain hyperacusis. I just want to learn more about it's effective and shortcomings and weight in the evidence objectively, because at the end of the day it's about getting people help not laymen's like myself arguing on a hyperacusis forum.


I do hold the view that pain from sound can be peripheral neuropathy and or the outer hair cell pain fibers malfunctioning in the cochlea,In most cases. I understand some of you don't subscribe to this model and treat hyperacusis pain as entirely in the audiotory pathways in the brain.

You can learn more about massage therapist helping peripheral neuropathy patients below.
https://www.foundationforpn.org/living-well/integrative-therapies/massage/
https://www.suzanneschaper.com/blog/can-massage-relieve-neuropathy/


The field of hyperacusis research is young, as all sciences really are. We don't know what is going to be discovered 10 years down the road. Let's never assume we have it all figured out.

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #16 

I don’t believe the pain you are describing is “entirely in the auditory pathways in the brain” as you put it.  Also, while the use of broadband noise may be helpful for some hyperacusics to improve their LDLs and diminish their pain response, for others, the use of broadband noise may be helpful in the first case, but not to manage the pain.   

It is important to define what “pain” means in the context of decreased sound tolerance.  Some hyperacusics feel pain when exposed to sound that exceeds their LDLs.  Other hyperacusics feel pain that is independent of exposure to sound.  Some hyperacusics experience both types of pain.  When patients refer to “pain hyperacusis” they usually do not mean “pain from sound” as you put it; they often mean pain that is independent of sound.

Second, knifelike pain can be treated and cured today.   

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contrast

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob



It is important to define what “pain” means in the context of decreased sound tolerance.  Some hyperacusics feel pain when exposed to sound that exceeds their LDLs.  Other hyperacusics feel pain that is independent of exposure to sound.  Some hyperacusics experience both types of pain.  When patients refer to “pain hyperacusis” they usually do not mean “pain from sound” as you put it; they often mean pain that is independent of sound.



Yes, I agree it's not just peripheral neuropathy. I have heard stories of different types of pain hyperacusis/ear pain that aren't even medically classified and recognized.  Patients are described so many different things in terms of pain. Burning ears triggered with or without sound.   Pain to the touch around their ears. Headaches from sound, Electrical shocks in the face, facial paraylsis from sound.

I hope hyperacusis diagnosis can be better defined instead of such a generic term for all patients.





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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hello,

Sound therapy has not worked for me unfortunately.

The first year onset of my sound injury induced H and T,  I had a burning pain all the time.  It slowly went away after a year.

I very seldom get pain now, but it has left me functionally disabled. I  hear all environmental noise much louder than it really is, including frequencies.  People's voices are still too loud to me, so they must speak more softly. I also have several T signals which are chronic, and worse with environmental sound. 

I have been diagnosed with severe T and H.  I am disabled by this, and currently no one has been able to help.  I was once an active woman...no more. 

Perhaps, people who experience PAIN  ONLY are being misdiagnosed, or self diagnosing?  Could this possibly be a reason why TRT has not helped them?   To get the right treatments/help, you need to have a correct diagnosis.  

I do believe that the term "Hyperacusis" has become an "umbrella term" for all types of audiological issues and abnormalities, which is confusing.

I do hope everyone here finds a path to move forward.

God bless,
Kathy Mc
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Lapidus

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Reply with quote  #19 

Yes, Kathy. "Hyperacusis" is no longer a legit diagnosis and we should take that into account when discussing on this forum, especially those who vouch for TRT as a legit treatment for "hyperacusis" when the probable truth is that there are many different types of "hyperacusis" with entirely different pathologies. TRT might work for one specific pathology but not another. Until we can properly diagnose and differentiate between these types of decreased sound tolerances we won't know who's gonna benefit from what.

Just for the record, I've also done TRT with a Jastreboff-trained clinican with no positive effect.


Dan. It's not true that Hyperacusis Research doesn't mention TRT anywhere on there website. It's mentioned here and there. For example, there is one patient story on the site with a guy who had success doing TRT. There's also the "Hyperacusis Device" project which is a new form of sound therapy/TRT being researched by Dr. Formby with help from Hyperacusis Research. However, their website is first and foremost about current medical research so it wouldn't be that odd if TRT isn't mentioned much.

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #20 

Quotes are from the previous post.

"Hyperacusis" is no longer a legit diagnosis."


Hyperacusis is a valid diagnosis. 

"... there are many different types of "hyperacusis" with entirely different pathologies."

Many clinicians do not subscribe to the view (from Dr. Tyler and others) that there are many different types of hyperacusis.  See this link to a book about hyperacusis and other disorders of sound intolerance published last year that does a good job characterizing this issue from both perspectives.  The book also does an excellent job discussing current research on decreased sound tolerance. 

https://www.amazon.com/Hyperacusis-Disorders-Sound-Intolerance-Perspectives/dp/1944883282

"... those who vouch for TRT as a legit treatment for "hyperacusis""

Most hyperacusics benefit greatly from a sound therapy program to increase their loudness discomfort levels whether the program is TRT or another form of sound therapy. 

Rob     

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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #21 
This is an interesting discussion, perhaps a bit beyond what the original poster BriGuy, intended. So BrIGuy, if you are still following, which I’m hopeful that you are, I continue to recommend you be evaluated by Dr. Jastreboff and learn from that experience.

My two cents. Hyperacusis is a valid diagnosis of a symptom, not a disease. It is a shared symptom of many underlying pathologies, and this is undeniable, in my view, if one reads through countless patient stories here and elsewhere, or peruses through medical literature, or spends time discussing with audiologists who treat and research this. The source of the underlying anatomical, or physiologic pathologies likely span from the outer ear to the cerebral cortex. Acoustic shock, traumatic brain injury, medication withdrawal, Lyme disease, ME/CFS, neck injury/whiplash, spinal cord injury, mast cell activation disorder, TMJ dysfunction, environmental chemical exposure, multiple sclerosis, amongst probably many more. All can share the symptom of hyperacusis yet have completely different pathology.

Although sound therapy has not helped me, it clearly has helped many and is a valid treatment modality. It has saved peoples lives. It does not work for everyone unfortunately. I also reflect the need for better stratification of patients with the symptom of hyperacusis who are likely to respond to sound therapy and those who may have less success, or perhaps may need a multifaceted approach where sound desensitization is one part of the strategy.

Best,
EDogg
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dave2

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Reply with quote  #22 
I share much of EDogg's perspectives and experience. I too tried sound therapy, and did it not just a Jastreboff-trained TRT clinician, but under the care of Dr. J himself, because I live near his clinic in Maryland.

Unfortunately, I fall into the Dr. J category 4 group, that is very difficult to treat. During the course of my TRT treatment my LDLs worsened quite dramatically, from about 85 to 65, which was incredibly discouraging, to say the least. We were forced to discontinue treatment altogether when the sound generators began to cause pain even at the lowest setting for about 15 minutes. At the start of treatment, the sound generators were perfectly fine, no pain, and I was very excited to be on the road of progress.

So I fit in the group of folks who just does not know how to proceed, since the standard TRT treatment did not pan out, and in fact I went in the wrong direction.

I do hope future treatments may be developed for people like me who have not responded to what is currently available.
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #23 
dave2 -

When I developed hyperacusis and began to explore my treatment options, the company that provided the broadband noise used in TRT, General Hearing Instruments, provided information on its website about its presentation.  This information, called a readout, helped me create a replica of the broadband noise with the same spectral characteristics used in TRT at that time, which I did in a recording studio, and to audition it to see if I could tolerate it.  I was unable to tolerate this broadband noise presentation for even five seconds without feeling pain and discomfort.  I had no doubt that had I done TRT at that time, it would have exacerbated my symptoms and further decreased my sound tolerance. 

Instead of doing TRT, I went in my own direction.  I applied some of the principles of TRT Dr. Jastreboff described in his book, but initially and for quite some time I used considerably less ambitious broadband noise than the presentation used in TRT.  Every three months, I increased the high end frequency of the presentation.  Eventually, I was easily able to tolerate the presentation used in TRT and to exceed it in terms of frequency and amplitude. 

In my opinion, the broadband noise emitted by the generators was too ambitious for you and while this wasn't clear at first, over time your LDLs worsened and you experienced pain when exposed to the presentation for a few minutes.  My situation was similar to yours, but I was able to move forward by building on an approach that seemed sensible to me, in part, and figuring out a way to apply it that was helpful to me while working with broadband noise I could tolerate. 

Rob

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dave2

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Reply with quote  #24 
Thanks, Rob, I think you are probably right, the noise emitted by the sound gens following the TRT approach was just not right for my case. I feel like it goes back to EDogg's comments about pathology. I don't know what my underlying pathology is, but I worry that if the TRT approach was not right, other sound therapies might not be right either. I will go back and review the approach you suggest, I remember having seen your posts explaining it. 
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #25 
Dave -

The first time I listened to broadband noise was when I put on the broadband pink noise presentation known as the Moses/Lang pink noise and listened to it through headphones.  Here is what happened next.  Several seconds after putting it on, I felt incredibly dizzy, almost to the point of passing out.  The next time I listened to broadband noise, we had recreated the presentation emitted by the GHI generators used in TRT and I felt pain and discomfort within several seconds.  I remember how frustrated I felt at the time when just a few seconds exposure to the TRT presentation was too much for me.  The bottom line, for me, is that, thru trial and error, I found broadband noise I could tolerate and moved forward from there.   

All you know right now, all you have experienced, is one broadband noise presentation.  We simply don't know at this point if a less ambitious presentation will have the same impact on you or not. 

Rob

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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #26 
I have been told I am a category 4 , which is the most difficult to treat using TRT.

As I posted, my main issues are amplified hearing perception, (environmental sound, sounds much louder that it really is) and multiple T signals that seem to emanate from my head.   I have tried sound therapy, and music as well.  I can only get so far, without much exacerbated T signals, an inflammation feeling in my left ear, and it has done nothing for my hearing perception.  Everything is still TOO LOUD.

I feel like I am going round and round in circles.  Just looking for some kind of way to move forward, so I can get out of my house, without the severe symptoms. I did try no protection for 2 1/2 yrs (per audiologists)  as well....did not work. When I do venture out in town, I wear Peltor muffs.

All the best
Kathy Mc  
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cozo

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodmccain
I have been told I am a category 4 , which is the most difficult to treat using TRT.

As I posted, my main issues are amplified hearing perception, (environmental sound, sounds much louder that it really is) and multiple T signals that seem to emanate from my head.   I have tried sound therapy, and music as well.  I can only get so far, without much exacerbated T signals, an inflammation feeling in my left ear, and it has done nothing for my hearing perception.  Everything is still TOO LOUD.

I feel like I am going round and round in circles.  Just looking for some kind of way to move forward, so I can get out of my house, without the severe symptoms. I did try no protection for 2 1/2 yrs (per audiologists)  as well....did not work. When I do venture out in town, I wear Peltor muffs.

All the best
Kathy Mc  

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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #28 
Hello, 

Whys is Dean Cosnetts name at the end of my post?  Also Rod McCain should be the registered member on the left. 

I also see that you have posted my comment twice.  I believe the first one #26 is correct.

Thanks
Kathy Mc
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #29 
It looks like cozo reposted what you wrote.  That would explain why his name is on the left and his signature is on the bottom. 
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BA

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Reply with quote  #30 
hi Briguy

sorry to hear. ( no pun intended )

If you can't get an idea, any idea of costs, my suggestion, find someone else.

I absolutely hate when you turn to a specialist or anyone and they 'can't quite give you a figure' even ball park number, even with caveats.

Our lives are stressful enough, and when we turn to specialists it isn't because ' that would be nice' . as we know it's because our lives are dramatically affected by our condition.

I have a rule, and it is a rule I learned the hard way, as I am a trusting person, and treat people like I want to be treated.  Always sad when it isn't reciprocated.
My rule, if it helps,  'explain your needs etc and state " I don't like surprises, please be clear on that".   if I get the right response, good to go, if I get hesitation, I walk.   Life got a lot simpler and less stressful when I started doing this.

I hope you can get someone to help, I just live with yellow squidgy ear plugs, made to measure silicon earplugs,  peltior shooting protectors, top end peltior protectors, and Sony Wx10003 headphones with awesome noise cancelling.

I pick the right tools for the day/visit/trip.  Trying to control my environment just got too hard, and as we know daily grind sometimes.

good luck, and hope this helps.

BA


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AnthonyO

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Reply with quote  #31 
Hyperacusis, Misophonia, Phonophobia, Tonic Tensor Tympanic Syndrome, Acoustic Shock Disorder, Recruitment and Meniere's disease aren't no laughing matters to "hear" about, but to many of us, this has become "The Road Less Traveled" that we have to walk upon.

I will keep my comments, short, concise & brief...mainly on my experience regarding the treatment offered by Dr. Pawel Jastreboff and the superior research of others, which this post was originally based upon.

1) You can be patient...for time unknown...to see what the great Dr. Charles Liberman's research will continue to successfully uncover and then see it implemented clinically.
2) You can continue to subscribe to and gleam from the great research work of Mr. Bryan Pollard.
... or ...
3) You can travel to the Baltimore area and consult with Dr. Jastreboff and consider his treatment utilizing the TRT protocol.

I...have done...and continue to do them all...but completed the 18 month course of the TRT treatment a few years back.

I will say this though, that I hold NO higher on the ladder, ANY of these great gentlemen's findings, accomplishments & years of scientific research or protocols. To do so...again, in my opinion...would be ill consideration with flawed conclusion.

AnthonyO

----------------------

Photo: Dr. Pawel Jastreboff & Anthony Ochoa - Dec. 2015, Baltimore, MD.

Anthony Ochoa & Dr. Pawel Jastreboff - Baltimore, MD - 2015-12-13.jpg

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rodmccain

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Reply with quote  #32 
Hello BriGuy,

I wanted to add, that I wish you all the best in your search for some answers to move forward.  I truly understand your plight. Don't give up hope. It is good that you are not housebound.  Try to stay positive on the things you CAN do.  Your life is far from over!

Unfortunately, this is not a "one size fits all" condition. 

God bless
Kathy Mc
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BriGuy

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Reply with quote  #33 
I want to thank each an every one of you for your insight and kind words. After much research, I am fairly certain I will go see Dr. Jastreboff.

One more question for everyone - Should I see an ENT prior to visiting him. I’ve had the Ménière’s disease tests done before and was told I probably have it. I don’t have vertigo (thank God), but I do fit the profile. Would Dr, J be able to diagnoses as well, or just provide treatment?

Thanks again to everyone out there. Stay strong, I know how difficult this can be.
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EDogg

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Reply with quote  #34 
Hi BriGuy,

Just my opinion. You’ve already seen 4 ENTs and have been provided varying diagnoses, including atypical Ménière’s disease (which to my knowledge is a sort of nonspecific category). You’ve actually done a lot of leg work already. If I were you, I’d see Dr. J and would provide him all the clinic notes, studies, etc that you have had thus far. Get a complete audiologic evaluation by him and go from there. He has loads of experience. If he thinks you need to get further ENT/neuro-otology evaluation, he can let you know that. He likely has connections to very skilled providers, if a consultation is needed.

Best,
EDogg
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AnthonyO

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Reply with quote  #35 
From what I remember, Dr. Jastreboff had on his part-time staff, a certified Doctor of Audiology (AuD) that would implement a wide battery of hearing tests that he would call for. Then he would read the reports and based upon those findings, make his determinations of what kind of tailored therapy he would assign to you.

One thing to note, is that Jastreboff is not a 'medical physician' nor does he claim to be, so he is very limited to performing, if any, audiological testing or coming in contact with a person's auditory apparatus...looking into ear canals, ear/nose/throat evaluations, prescribe medications, etc, etc.  If he feels you might be suffering from any type of ear infection, otitis externa or otitis media, he will refer you to a local otorhinolaryngologist (ENT doctor) in the local Baltimore area, before he starts therapy with you.

Remember my good and faithful friend, Dr. Jastreboff's therapy is his own proprietary protocol, based upon his own personal findings & research and anecdotal feedback from his clients.  Also, "TRT" is not registered with "The Federation of State Medical Boards" or "The American Board of Professional Psychology", as he so states himself, it is not.  His services fall under "Specialized Counseling" and is administered by "The Jastreboff Hearing Disorders Foundation Inc.", an bonafide organization that makes contributions in the form of scientific & clinical research into diagnosis methods, underlying causes and treatment options for the betterment of individuals with hearing disorders.

I wish you the very best good sir!

AnthonyO
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BriGuy

Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDogg
Hi BriGuy,

Just my opinion. You’ve already seen 4 ENTs and have been provided varying diagnoses, including atypical Ménière’s disease (which to my knowledge is a sort of nonspecific category). You’ve actually done a lot of leg work already. If I were you, I’d see Dr. J and would provide him all the clinic notes, studies, etc that you have had thus far. Get a complete audiologic evaluation by him and go from there. He has loads of experience. If he thinks you need to get further ENT/neuro-otology evaluation, he can let you know that. He likely has connections to very skilled providers, if a consultation is needed.

Best,
EDogg


EDogg - Good point. Thank you for making some sense of my situation. Sometimes an objective, outside perspective is needed. The way forward can be difficult to figure out at times.

I am working my own pink noise therapy right now, and I do feel like it is working for me. I will continue to do so and probably go to see Dr. J shortly after.

Thank you everyone for the info!
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Aplomado

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Posts: 625
Reply with quote  #37 
Glad the pink noise seems to be helpful so far!  Keep working!
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