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Flapjack

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Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello friends,


I've been looking for earplugs specifically designed to attenuate high-pitched sounds; typically voices, children's screams, motorbikes, etc.

This, as I'm currently having a set of -35dB foam earplugs and Peltor Optime III earmuffs at hand... which are inefficient against such sounds.

And I don't think moulded earplugs would be any better in that respect.


Any suggestions, feedbacks?
Cheers
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PJ007

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Reply with quote  #2 

Hi- this is from a previous post I sent about advice we got for our son....I think #3 could help you but you would need to see an audiologist to see if it would work for you.  Have you been able to find a doctor to rule out physical reasons that could be corrected with surgery?

 

We use #1 for our son and his tolerance for sound has really really improved from a year ago.  He can handle low frequency sounds and now is able to handle more high frequency sounds....we are getting there.   I wish you the best.   PJ

 

P.S.  Number 1 could help you improve your tolerance of sound too.   My son listens to it for four to five hours per day....everyday.  

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We use the Homedics Device. We have three in our house so we cover all areas. The pink noise on it include Waterfalls, Ocean, Heartbeat, Rainforest, and Summer Night. Some of the sounds include bird and insect noises. Here is the one we use: http://www.homedics.com/home/top-selling/soundspa.html


The three devices we were shown by our audiologist were:
1. Homedics devices
2. Neuromonics (they are expensive and would have picked this but our son won't wear the headsets. I think the cost is $3,000.) http://www.neuoromonics.com
3. Tranquil OTE by General Hearing Instruments Inc.- This device helps tinnitus so a person can wear them and function better with noises. It distracts the brain's attention from its focus on tinnitus. This product is something we could try on our son if the therapy didn't work when he is older. It has a small battery that pops out so it isn't really good for younger kids. It costs in the 100's- can't recall the price but I think between $500 and $1000 http://www.ata.org

What works for our son may not work for someone else. It is best to work with a hyperacusis and tinnitus center.
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Flapjack

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi PJ, thank you for your post and references.

I am indeed trying to "re-educate" my ears progressively, which includes listening to such sounds.

However I still need efficient earplugs when I'm heading out!
Something specifically designed to block high-pitched sounds. Not sure whether that exists...
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PJ007

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Reply with quote  #4 
 Flapjack

 # 3 makes sounds more tolerable....it is like ear plugs but it doesn't cut out sound....it makes sounds in the real world easier to deal with.....

 I think there are others that use earplugs sometimes on here. 

 We don't use earplugs with our son because we can expose him to noise little by little as he gets more use to it.

 I know someone else may have an answer for you about the earplugs.

 If our son's sound therapy doesn't work completely- we will be getting him the #3 device or another similar device that may not be invented yet.


PJ
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Snow_World

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Reply with quote  #5 
Flapjack--I don't know of any earplugs that block out high-pitched sounds specifically, but I would suggest having some plugs custom-molded for your ear.   An audiologist took molds for me.  They are a bit expensive compared to over-the-counter foam plugs but are way more effective in my experience, and don't have to be thrown out after a couple uses.

I have a -39bd pair that look a bit like hearing aids but it's basically a lump of rubber-like material.  I also have a pair of custom "musician" plugs that have filters of -15 and -25, and caps of -30db that can be switched in and out.  This pair is smaller and looks more like regular plugs.

A danger with plugs is overuse.  For whatever reason, I am so sensitive that my plugs do not comfortably block out many sounds of the city, including high-pitched sounds like telephones and sirens.



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Flapjack

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Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #6 
@ PJ: sometimes one needs a device that completely blocks sound

@ Snow World: I think moulded plugs are indeed more comfortable in the long term (e.g. driving a car everyday, taking the tube, etc.). But as you say in your last sentence, even these are inefficient when it comes to blocking high-pitched sounds! Too bad.
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Stormy

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Posts: 109
Reply with quote  #7 
Flapjack- I agree with Snow World - an audi can custom make you some for $45 up.
I shoot competitively every weekend wearing a pair and gunfire is in the high freq range.

Now the trick for me was to get the plug to go as close to the eardrum as possible.  To do this he had to use an otoblock so as not to risk damaging the eardrum.
Spacing can be an issue, if not spaced correctly, then when I would speak I would get feedback which would drive me nuts.


Good Luck
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