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alh

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,

I have noted in a number of members' posts that audiologists need to carry out a "frequency specific loudness discomfort level test" to assist in the diagnosis of hyperacusis.

Does anyone know what the frequencies are?

The reason I ask is that I live in regional Australia where hearing professionals have limited experience regarding patients who suffer from hyperacusis.

I would like to be able to say to any future hearing professional what test is needed to evaluate this condition.

Essentially, I would like to be informed before meeting with a hearing professional who may expose me to unnecessary testing which is of no benefit.

I'm tired of being a test dummy...
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phacker

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Posts: 132
Reply with quote  #2 
The LDL test will use a range of low, mid, and high frequencies. Your discomfort level could be different between low, mid and high frequencies. They should start at a db level that you feel no discomfort and increase the db level until you feel discomfort.  Once your discomfort level is reached at a given db level the testing for that frequency should end. Do not permit them to keep increasing the db level once you feel discomfort. If by chance you could handle a frequency up to 85 db with no discomfort, I would recommend you do not let them test you over 85 db.  
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Rob

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Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #3 

alh –

The frequencies tested in a loudness discomfort level (LDL) test are .5 kHz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 3 kHz, 4 kHz, 6 kHz, 8 kHz, 10 kHz, and 12 kHz.  The best equipment tests up to 12 kHz, which is ideal, while other equipment tests up to 8 kHz.        

As a suggestion, any clinician who is unaware of the utility of an LDL test to help diagnose hyperacusis is of no help to you.  I would find a clinician in Australia who has successfully diagnosed and treated individuals with hyperacusis. 

Myriam Westcott is a well-regarded audiologist in Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia who is very knowledgeable about hyperacusis diagnosis and treatment.  Her clinic is called Dineen Westcott Moore Audiology.  I would consider going to her even if you have to travel to do so or ask the clinic for a recommendation for an audiologist who works in your area.

I would not set any conditions as to how loud the clinician should test you at each frequency.  Normal sound tolerance is around 100 dB.  It is important for you and your clinician to know if you have normal tolerance at a given frequency or not. 

Good luck!

Rob 

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alh

Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #4 
Thankyou Rob and phacker for your replies.

I appreciate the information you have given me.

Yes, I did see that Miriam Westcott is an accomplished audiologist in Victoria.

Her clinic is two states away from me but I agree, if I am unable to find anyone locally then, I will have to consider travelling distances to get tested by an expert.

I hadn't considered contacting the clinic for local recommendations.

I will phone tomorrow to see if they can be of any assistance.

Many thanks for your suggestion. Kind regards, alh

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janeygirl

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Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #5 
I have a hearing test every year since I completed the TRT retraining therapy. I make sure they do a loudness tolerance test each time. I learned, however, that they are actually doing a loudness intolerance test and ask me to put my hand up when it gets to be too much. Is this the same thing as a loudness or frequency tolerance test?
__________________
Jane Parks-McKay
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Rob

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Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #6 
Jane,

Some audiologists administer a loudness test by voice rather than a frequency-specific loudness test. 

Rob
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