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Quint

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Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,

Been a while since I posted on here.  I have some dental treatment back in June this year.  This involved a brief period of drilling < 30 seconds.  I had my fingers in my ears and didnt have any pain or even any slight discomfort or difference afterwards.  My ears felt just fine. The next day I happened to take delivery of a new TV and and within 2 hours my ears were burning me and I developed a thumping sound in my ears.  Since then I have been unable to listen to any sound thru a TV.  Bizarrely this has not affected my use on the phone or thru my car stereo which i can listen to no problem at all.  Its just TV's.  I have been to see Dr. Jasterboff and he said that if the drill had affected me I would have noticed it and had pain straightaway.  I didnt.  It was 24 hours later and a new TV which brought on my symptoms.  But I just cant believe it was just a coincidence.  Here I am five months later after a drilling episode which last less than 30 seconds and I still cannot listen to a TV.  I have tried everything-old tv's, stereo systems hooked up to TV, etc etc  and nothing has worked. Last week I had to go back from some minor treatment and the dentist didnt drill but use a water suction device inside my mouth.  Again for prob less than 30 seconds.  Again the symptoms have come back.

My tinnitus is also worse but again this didnt happen immediately.  I notice the tinnitus worse about a month and a half later.  Again-its only TV's I have an issue with eg I can go out to a bar with loud music (with plugs in) and have no problems.  The burning sensation only happens with TV speakers.  I even flew recently trans atlantic and it had no affect. Surey if the drilling had been the cause of this all sounds would have been worse not just the TV?  Could it be a viral thing I have?

Anyone's thoughts or similar experiences would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks a million.

Derek

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Derek
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olms

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quint:

I would think that holding your ears while a dentist drills on your hard teeth with a hard, steel drill, one inch from your ear drums, would make the sound of the drill louder.

Since the sound is coming from inside of your eardrum, and trying to get out of the ear canal, your holding your ears would prevent any sound from getting out of your ear canal, and make the sound louder. I would think.

If the sound was coming from outside of your eardrum, from a foot or two or more away from some source beside the dental chair, then holding your ears would be beneficial, for it would at least slow down some of the sound from coming into your ear canal and going to the outside of the ear drum.

Holding your ears from the dental drill that was inside of your mouth, would slow down some of the sound that escaped your mouth, and came around from the outside of your ear.

If you hold your ears--right now--and hum, does the hum increase in noise or decrease? Mine increases, because all of the noise from the hum is inside my mouth, and can only slow down by escaping out of the ear canal from the inside of the ear drum out.

But if I close my ears while I hum, none of the noise, coming from the inside of the ear drum, can get out of the ear canal.

If you were in a steel drum with the top on, and hollered, none of the sound could escape because the top would not let the noise escape. If you then took the top off and hollered, the sound would be less because some of the sound would escape out of the open top of the steel drum.

What happens when you hum, and then hold your ears close?

I think the best solution to the dentist is to brush and then floss and rinse with a mouthwash once a day, to try and prevent cavities. I also, basically, don't eat any sugar.

Once you have a cavity, it's either have the tooth pulled for endure the loud dental drill (about 90 decibels compared with a sound tolerance level for many h people of about 70 to 75 decibels, which one can find by looking at the sound chart on the first page of this web site).

One can find the sound level of a dental drill by going to the search engine and typing in "dental drill decibel level.")

I haven't had a cavity in 5-7 years by brushing, and once a day floss and rinsing with a mouth wash, whenever I floss. It can be done. I wouldn't recommend waiting till my next cavity arrived to discover the difficult choices. 
     
What happens when you hum, and then hold your ears?

                  Tom



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Quint

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Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Tom,

Thanks for your reply. One thing I would say is that my mouth was obviously open so noise would obviously escape that way too. Try the humming exercise with your mouth open and closed. There is a difference The initial drill was on the molar on my bottom jaw which is about 4 inches from my ear drum on my right and 8 inches from my left. To be honest my mindset was that not covering my ears and that drill going would have caused me way more damage. Remember - I didn't have any pain or discomfort after the procedure. It was only 24 hours later about 2 hours after putting the new TV on that the problems started.

Do you not think not covering up would have caused more discomfort?

Thanks Derek

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Derek
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olms

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Reply with quote  #4 
Derek:

I think you're right: covering your ears probably did help.

But my point was, I don't think going into the dentist chair thinking covering your ears is going to negate the the loud sound (90 decibels?) of the dentist drill that comes from inside one's mouth, and therefore from inside the eardrum.

I think your ears would have told you that holding your ears while the dentist drilled on your teeth was not the thing to do, and you would have unplugged your ears immediately. 

The fact that your ears did not tell you that, did not tell you to unplug your ears, told you that it was working. It didn't tell me, because I wasn't there, and therefore my confusion about that.

However, the fact that your ears told you the next day after the drilling that your ears were in pain, tells you that going to the dentist was not a good idea. 

That's when the question of should one go to the dentist comes to mind. Well, when one has a toothache, yes. Or, some might prefer having the tooth pulled rather than subject their ears to the noise, especially when most h people have sound tolerance levels of 70 to 75 dB (see sound chart on page 1 of this website), while the dentist drill is around 90 dB (go to browser search engine and type in >sound level of dentist drilll<.

So, what to do? In some ways it's an unsolvable delimia. But there is a solution. And that is: good dental hygine. Part of the solution is knowing what the problem is: If you have h and you have a cavity, you're in trouble.

This thing of being casual about brushing your teeth, and lacsidaiscal about whether you're going to floss, and you'll gargle mouthwash when you dang well please, is an invitation to disaster. If you don't realize, there is no good solution if you get a cavity, then you're of the mindset that you can be quite carefree when it comes to taking care of your teeth.

You're of the mindset that somebody's going to rescue you if you get a cavity. Nobody's going to rescue you. Reading horror stories such as yours and other's on this site is going to wakeup some, that good dental hygine is critical. It's the only good solution.

And yes, you used "sound protection." It didn't work did it? Are others realizing what you just told them? Is it sinking in to the point that they'll start brushing their teeth? Let's hope they take this serious.

Here's what I've learned from earlier disasters. "Sound protection" doesn't work. The dental drill on a h person's teeth, doesn't work. Getting one's teeth pulled is a choice, and some note they wish they had chosen that option to the drill.

But what comes through is: "sound protection" doesn't work. What does that leave? Brushing your teeth. I also choose to floss because "sound protection" doesn't work. When I floss, I also choose to garble with mouthwash. Why is that? Because I know that "sound protection" doesn't work.

Because I am terrified of getting a cavity and realizing what I am up against. Why do I brush? Because I am terrified of getting a cavity. So, what regimine do I follow now after reading of these horror stories on this website, and reading how these people tried"sound protection," even the almighty electronic earphones from Bose, and they didn't help?

My regimine is, I brush my teeth, I floss, I garble. Except, I don't floss like I should. I'm terrfied and I'm also lazy. I just read, once a day floss. Maybe. I may floss 2 or 3 times a week, everytime I floss, I gargle.

I don't eat sugar. I like sweets, but I'm terrified of the dentist, and I think of that when I see a desert, and the fear of the dentist wins out and I don't have a desert. I don't drink cola, I drink water.

Some non-sweet foods have sugar, but I feel I have no control over that, and have the small amount of sugar with those non-sweet foods. Sugar is horrible on the teeth and is also bad for t and h, making it worse.

When I would have, say, jelly made from fruit, not sugar, thinking that might be OK, it wasn't. After such a treat, that night when I would lay down and go to sleep, a place or two between my teeth would tingle. Oh horror! Was that a pre-cavity? In my mind it was.

Then, or the next day, I would brush, floss between those tingling places, and mouthwash, praying that the tingling would go away. It did. I swore off of fruit flavored jelly. Haven't had any in months. Haven't had any tingling in months. I wonder if there is a connection? Yeah.

Just recently, I have felt more tingling between my teeth at night than usual, which means I 'm doing something wrong, and I'm wondering what that is. 

So, I looked on the back of some of the containers I've been eating from and discovered/rediscovered some things. 1. I eat cottage cheese (3 grams of sugar, 1/2 cup) and canned fruit (13 grams of sugar, 1/2 cup).

2. My tingling teeth are telling me, that's too much sugar. 3. Why not try fresh fruit, fructose, but no sugar added, like fresh blueberries/blackberries at grocery story for a reduction in sugar on my cottage cheese? Why not try no sugar (fruit) on my cottage cheese? Or, have a few slices of a banana that I would have put on my cereal?

4. I see my raisins have 29 grams of sugar (way high) for 1/4 cup. No more raisins with my bananas on cereal. 5. Pork and beans, buy the can with the lowest sugar.
 

So, Derek, your experience may be helping others. That's a positive. People can learn from your experience. That's a positive.

As for why your ear trouble 24 hours after the dentist visit, but not before, I once had a sound event like that and for a day or two or three, I was OK. When I got off to myself, ear trouble from that event came on like gangbusters. And I got really angry at the event but for the first 2 or 3 days I wasn't angry about anything.

But when the ear problems surfaced, I was very upset, showing, I've had that delayed reaction, also, and had never heard of that until you mentioned it.

Whenever I have a setback, and I'm complaining, etc., I say to myself, you're gonkg to sit on the couch and comlain, right? That's your therapy? That's your positive, right? So, I say, why not put my ears under the moist heaqting pad for 30 minutes instead of complaining for 30 more minutes?

I can't fight that reasoning. I don't allow myself to. As much "sense" and "good reasoning" as it may sound to keep complaiining and worrying, I don't allow myself to do that. 

I have a extended length (c. 24 inches) heating pad, which I moisten, then lay it on my pillow, and cut on high. My right ear goes on the pillow, I wrap the rest of the pad around to the top ear, and put a partial catelog on top to hold it down. I lay there for from 15 to 30 or more minutes.

If noise and medicine constrict the blood vessills to the inner ear and cause ear damage, which they do, then why wouldn't a heating pad expand the blood vessils and bring more oxygen and nutriens to the inner ear and help the ears? They do.

I can do this at night before I go to sleep, as I'll be laying in bed anyway trying to get to sleep, as with early in the a.m., when I still groggy and I can get in another 15 to 30 minutes just laying there half asleep. I can repeat that at noon if I'm especially worried or upset about my ears.

I'm living life in 3-4 ingrements, which gets me through a day. I'll take it to complaining and worrying all day.  

I 've tried hot peppers, etc., they help my ears, but can give me stomach trouble. You can give them a try.

I use a frozen gel pack from the ice box to cool down my hot ears, 1 minute on each ear, standing up.

I read on this website that a warm to very warm bath helps h, I realize now that it does. I sometimes use a plastic cup and take the warm water, sometimes from the faucet, and pour it on my head several times or more, and that helps also. I can even use the kitchen sink during the day for that.

I also know that by trying to help others it can get the flow of energy going from my problems to worrying about somebody else's problems and it can help me, also. Find somebody you can help and see what happens.

Also, I read a column on being positive when it comes to trying to solve problems, which made me realize I had a negative unconscious. It said, when you go into a problem, think positively that you can solve the problem. It said learn from your mistakes. 

What's positive? You've helped others. You know to brush your teeth and floss. Rather than the mistake being a total waste, the column said to learn from your mistakes. What did you learn? You know what awaits the next time you get a cavity. You know to cut out sweets and add flossing.                                                            
                                 Tom
             

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Quint

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Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Tom,

Thank you for that. It was most helpful. I guess what I am most confused about is that I didn't have the pain straight away and that it is only tv's that cause it. No other sound triggers it. I can listen to car stereo for example but not the TV. And it's not like the pain I would have had before. That pain ways a sharp nerve like pain. This is a burning sensation. Anyway Hastreboff says it wasn't the drilling as I would have felt the sensation straight away and I must follow the protocol for misophonia. I have been thru way worse episodes than this-fire alarms, kids screaming, MRI scans etc and gave me really bad pain but I was always able. To listen to TV afterwards. But six months later I still cannot with this. That's why I think it could be a virus or something.

Derek

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Derek
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Paulbe

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Reply with quote  #6 
I find that covering my ears actually intensified the sound.  Leaving them open gave the sound somewhere else to go, dispersing a bit in the room rather than being contained. 
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