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dki

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi everyone,

New member here, having had tinnitus for about a year now and wondering why the fullness in my ear and pain sensitivity to sounds in one ear is after my hearing test came back normal and I was examined by an ENT as ok. But now I plan to contact my dr. and get the LDL test done, and continue to read beyond some of the articles I've read online.

My question is whether this increased sensitivity to sounds is causing further damage to the ear or hearing, or causing increased tinnitus, even if the triggering sound hurts but is not loud enough to cause hearing loss - say a kid squealing for a few seconds at 75 decibels. It may be painful, but is it causing further hearing loss or damaging anything -- or is it "just" causing pain?

From what I read, the answer is no, a sound like this isnt causing further damage. For example I read in a huffpost article  where the Dr. Marghzar, who is on the list of specialistsin this network, tells the author/patient to not be concerned about noises that won't actually damage hearing. I would feel much relief if this is confirmed here, as part of my struggle is wondering if hyperacusis somehow makes you more susceptible to damage that causes hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. 

Thank you so much for your help. I've become sowhat of a basketcase trying to figure out whats up with my ear, trying on all sorts of ear protective devices, becming increasingly aware of sounds that dont hurt (but may one day if I'm not careful, so my thinking goes), taking decibel readings of everything, wondering if I am going crazy, etc. Joining a mindfulness based stress reduction class is helping me manage the stress, but for the actual pain and fullness, nothing has helped yet, but now I know at least where to start thanks to this group.
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Rob

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Posts: 42
Reply with quote  #2 
Hyperacusis sometimes accompanies tinnitus and it is possible that is why you are experiencing aural fullness and sensitivity to some sounds.  As you know, the LDL test will help your doctors determine whether you have hyperacusis or not.  I'm glad you are considering having the test administered.  That would be a good next step. 

Many folks have decreased sound tolerance (or tinnitus for that matter) who also have normal hearing.  The increased sensitivity to normal sound will not cause damage to your ears or worsen your hearing.  Whether you have tinnitus or hyperacusis or both conditions, you are not more susceptible to damage or to hearing loss. 

I suggest not overprotecting your ears in settings where you are exposed to normal sound.  I also recommend you not take readings with a decibel meter.  Fear of sound and stress about sound can turn into very tricky mindsets to deal with. 

Rob
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dki

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks so much for clarifying, Rob. I think a huge part of my fear has been associating the pain with further damage, which was very stressful. I'm considering going to see one of the specialists listed on the site. I have headphones with me when I know or think I may be exposed to loud sounds, just in case, but don't use ear protection otherwise (unless trying to sleep with loud neighbors and such). Thanks again for the advice!
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