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LS

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello

Are hearing aids with sound  (example: Widex Moment with Zen sound program....chimes and chimes with white noise sound) the same as TRT using pink noise?

Some people state that white noise or pink noise or other colored noise is the way to go but  does the noise selected actually matter or is it just a matter of listening to something for certain lengths of time set just under the T noise over a long period of time?

Any clarification on this would be greatly appreciated. [smile]



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Animagus11

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Reply with quote  #2 
My audiologist is using Widex RIC EVOKE hearing aids to do TRT, apparently both Phonak and Widex offer tinnitus programs for their aids. Whether or not its the Zen mode she will be using is another question I can't answer just yet. Hopefully I'll have a pair in the near future and can update. Ultimately I'm sure it's up to the individual clinician and their preference there, though. 
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LS

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hello animagus11 

I see you also reside in Canada.

I assume these are your first hearing aids? 
I would be very interested in knowing how things go for you.

I was a bit disappointed when I first got mine because I assumed the tinnitus noise would magically disappear when I had them on.  While some people experience this, it has not been so for me. I can still hear it.  ( guess it depends on the hearing loss frequency).  
However, after wearing them for a few weeks, it is much better now when I have them on.   When my ear is especially noisy, I will turn on the sound and the T volume goes down a bit (or is it that my brain is distracted so it seems quieter?)  
I'm in the processing of getting the Bluetooth feature added to my aids so I can download whatever apps I want.

I also suffer from hyperacusis which has recently worsened considerably.
The "H" started a few days after the "T" but I was only bothered by certain sounds (bacon sizzling....cutlery on dishes, tea kettle.....

I was told the worst thing to do its to overprotect from every day sounds so I didn't.  
A couple of weeks ago I did some errands in town.  Just exposed to everyday sounds of noise on the roads, grocery store etc.  
I ended up in hell.  T volume much higher, muffled hearing (like I was 1000 ft underwater), ear pain, ear burning, head burning......
Since then, my sound tolerance has decreased even further.  I cannot shower anymore.  I am so sad (it was the only thing that would mask my T completely).   I can no drive a car, can't leave my home...…..I was in the hospital yesterday for a procedure (unrelated) and wore ear plugs and ear muffs and still thought the sounds were too loud.
I wish I would have worn hearing protection the day I did errands.....maybe it wouldn't have gotten to this point.  My ears were not ready to handle that much noise at once even if they were every day sound.

This is you life and your health. You have many years ahead of you and the quality of your life depends on what you now.  I can' imagine listen one dog barking loudly, yet alone a number of dogs al at once.  Does your employer offering any hearing protection?  My sleeping pill is starting to kick in now so good lick
 
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Animagus11

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yes, this will be my first pair of hearing aids- more for H than T really, though I'm noticing some reactive T now that I'm participating in regular life a little more and restrictions have eased. Something to ask the doc about next time I see her, though I wouldn't consider it to be more than a moderate ringing at it's absolute worst. I'll keep you posted on my thoughts once I have my aids fitted! hopefully sooner than later.

My H started much like you describe yours, except the ear "fullness" and hearing everything as if I were underwater, like you mentioned (but still absurdly loud) were my most upsetting symptoms that brought me in to get my hearing checked. I actually thought it was auditory processing disorder at first because of the difficulties I was having with pulling meaning from sound that was actually just really uncomfortable for me to listen that hard to. 

I've also noticed a steady decline in my sound tolerance with every new (reasonably noisy) outing, and was also told to stay away from hearing protection unless absolutely necessary. It's disheartening to say the least, and I often feel like every time I go out I just make it worse for myself, even though I know that isn't necessarily the case.

My workplace does offer hearing protection, however my ear canals are extremely small and the earplugs don't fit very well. I'm tempted to ask if it would be useful to have custom moulds with filters made, but I'm sure that's also a pricey piece of equipment, and these hearing aids are definitely going to take up my coverage for hearing equipment/protection for the year. might just need to hunt down some extra small plugs at the drugstore or find some scissors and test out my "artisanal earplug sculpting skills" [tongue]
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LS

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hello animagus11

Sorry about the end of my post to you last night. I'm so embarrassed.  I was switched from Amitriptyline to a sleeping pill (Zopiclone 7.5 mg). I can't believe how quickly it took effect. 
I hope this is something I can take long term because, wow, what a difference. 
    

I don't know how much custom ear plugs are in in your province.  I'm in Ontario and I'm getting some made for $300 + tax.  This a includes two different decibel filters. One where speech is more audible and one that has a higher decibel rating.   My health plan fully covered my hearing aids but it won't cover the custom plugs. 

I have heard of people using ""artisanal earplug sculpting skills" to custom fit store bought ear plugs.  

Good luck to you.  Please keep in touch and let me know how the hearing aids work for you. [smile]
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Animagus11

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Reply with quote  #6 
No worries! I've been there myself and remember how fast they kick in and how foggy they made my brain. (thankfully I seem to be sleeping a lot better without any meds these days- a miracle really) 

That's a pretty wicked price for my wallet. I suspect it'll cost a little less here, but definitely not less than $200. I wonder if the different filters are something that would affect the cost as well. Definitely something to ask the doc about. 

I shall update as I learn more!
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #7 

The way the sound generators for tinnitus work is to train your brain to ignore it.

When you have annoying tinnitus, it is annoying because your brain notices it, tells you it is not "supposed to be there."  So it bothers you, and you "hear" it all the time.

When wearing sound generators (tuned a little lower than the tinnitus) your brain says "what's that noise? Oh, it is the things I am wearing in my ear"... repeat many, many times and your brain starts tuning out the tinnitus.  It is "there" but you won't usually notice it.  Your brain inteprets it as nonthreatening, normal and "boring."

When is the last time you heard your refrigerator motor running?  You don't hear the sound, because your brain ignores it.

Same idea.

I don't have much tinnitus fortunagely, but the sound generators helped me a lot to not be bothered by what I have.  Usually!  Your results may vary.

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DanMalcore

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Dan
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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Are hearing aids with sound  (example: Widex Moment with Zen sound program....chimes and chimes with white noise sound) the same as TRT using pink noise?
Some people state that white noise or pink noise or other colored noise is the way to go but  does the noise selected actually matter or is it just a matter of listening to something for certain lengths of time set just under the T noise over a long period of time?  Any clarification on this would be greatly appreciated.


No, it is definitely not the same.  The culmination of all sounds (equal energy in all frequencies) is called white noise.  Although hyperacusis patients are usually sensitive to all frequencies, we are particularly sensitive to the high frequencies.  Therefore, we must take this into consideration when designing a sound therapy for recovering our decreased sound tolerances (DST).  Many hyperacusis patients have found they can significantly improve their DST by concentrating on the specific band of frequencies we mostly hear in everyday life.  The answer to this is analog unfiltered broadband pink noise.  White noise will help but it will slow your progress because it contains all frequencies, including the high frequencies.  Pink noise is what TRT uses.

[wave] Dan

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