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Delfade

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Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone,
I have a 6 hours flight next week.

I'm worrying about the air pressure.

I remember before having H.. I went through some pain in my ears from air pressure.


-For Loud sounds:
Maybe I'll buy ear muffs or ear plugs
or maybe bose headphones (suggestions please).

-For Air Pressure:
I need help for that.
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emrahdemir

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfade
Hello everyone, I have a 6 hours flight next week. I'm worrying about the air pressure. I remember before having H.. I went through some pain in my ears from air pressure. -For Loud sounds: Maybe I'll buy ear muffs or ear plugs or maybe bose headphones (suggestions please). -For Air Pressure: I need help for that.



Hi, I have a mild H and I am using this alpine Flyfit earplugs which was enough for me for the 3 hours flight. It is said that it regulates the pressure.
You can have a look. Here is the link: http://www.alpinehearingprotection.com/earplugs/flyfit/

Also, I chew a gum during the take off and landing which I believe also help.
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emrahdemir

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi again, however it cuts the sound around 15 db.Therefore, please also ask other people about their opinion and experiences...
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emrahdemir

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #4 
Here there is some spesific information regarding the product. Sorry, I found only in German: http://www.in-ear-systeme.de/pdfs/Alpine%20FlyFit.pdf
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StringBean

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #5 
Bose QC25 Noise-Cancelling Headphones. Worth every penny (even if you don't have hyperacusis).

During descent, chew gum so your ears frequently pop.
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olms

Registered:
Posts: 321
Reply with quote  #6 
Delfade:

I just went to the search engine on the opening page of my internet, and typed in: passenger noise in jet.

In the 9th entry, which was titled, "In-cabin noise level (for jets)..." in a 2006 article for Canadian Acoustics of the Canadian acoustical association, it said,

      "As a general tendency, continuous noise levels were seen to be 60-65 dB(A) prior to takeoff, and 80-85 dB(A) and 75-80 dB(A) during flight and landing, respectively. Discontinuous in-cabin noise levels were observed to reach levels as high as 81-88 dB(A) range."

We'll put the plane at 85 dB at some points during the flight, as a middle estimate.

     Next go to the first page of this web site, table of contents, and click on the sound level chart. Then find your level of toleration for sound. For instance, normal conversation is 60 dB, heavy city traffic or school cafeteria is 85 dB, a lawn mower is 90 dB.

If your noise tolerance level is higher than normal conversation (60 db), but lower than heavy city traffic or a school cafeteria (85 db), you sound tolerance level would be about 70 to 75 dB, possibly as high as 80 dB. (You determine what you think.)

With 75 dB being a middle estimate. 

Now, put the 2 numbers together: 75 dB sound tolerance level for your ears, and the airplane sound level at 85 dB.

Conclusion: your ears are in for a beating. Also, dBs numbers don't go up by just a point between 75 and 76 for instance, but go up by multiples, so the difference between 75 and 80 decibels is tremendous.

Since you have hyperacusis, or an increased sensitivity to sound, the very purpose of this network, your hearing is twice as loud as the average person. So to you, the sound level of an 85 dB airplane, sound like 170 decibels.

A lawn mower is 90 dB. When was the last time you stood by a lawn mower, for 6 hours, or for 5 seconds? I already know the answer, since you've had h, you've never done that. Why not? It's too loud.

When was the last time you've put on so called "ear protection" and stood by a lawn mower for 6 hours or for 5 seconds? I already know the answer, you've never done that. Why? Because it's too loud.          

The lawn mower is all you need to know as to how loud the jet is. If you want to make the lawn mower (90 db) the same loudness as the plane (85 dB), step away from the lawn mower by 5-7 feet. It's still going to be too loud. Also, the lawn mower is not 90 decibels to you, but 180 dB, that's another reason it's so loud to you and you haven't been around one in years.

So, the instant they cut on the engines, you're in trouble. But your flight is 6 hours. OSHA (U.S. occupational safety group, has guidelines for the number of hours anyone is supposed to be by various machines, including 85 dB. If the average hearing person can stand by such a machine for an hour, just a guess, OSHA will not let the plant put him by that machine for a second hour without a rest, to let his ears rest.

So, if you can stand the airplane for the first 15 minutes, or even the first hour, it doesn't mean everything is going to be as "easy" the second hour or the 5th or 6th. And your ears don't get to rest in an airplane. OSHA would not let you fly.   

And, the machine (your airplane) is not 85 dB for an hour, it is 170 dB for an hour, because you have h, and your ears hear twice as loud as normal ears.

All your ears have going for them is hour brain. They don't have their ears anymore to help them because you screwed up somewhere. If you keep fouling up, your ears don't stand a chance. Your ears haven't done anything wrong, you have. Now start thinking about your ears and quit thinking about yourself.

You've got two babies. They're your ears. Now start taking care of them. 

                               
                                        Tom
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Delfade

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #7 
@emrahdemir
@StringBean
@olms

I can't wear earplugs.. They make me worse.

I borrowed my cousin Bose QC15, I'll wear them in the whole 6 hours.

I'm so terrified from the trip.

I'll go to london.. One of the loudest cities in the world.

The reason why I want to go there is because I read alot of succesful trips in airplanes at this website.

They gave me the courage to do it.

I'm bored too.. That's another reason.

I know it's the dumbest thing I will ever do in my life!

And maybe I'll regret it alot!

But the problem is.. I payed for the tickets and the hotel.

-

I'm not scared about the sound.. Because I can manage that with my Noise Cancellation headphones.

I'm scared about the pressure.. And the ear pain!

Even normal people are scared from air pressure!

I'll try chewing gums.. And I wish I can get over it easily in the trip.


-

I'll wear the headphones in every noisy street in london.

I'll keep you updated.. Wish me goodluck.

Thanks.
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olms

Registered:
Posts: 321
Reply with quote  #8 

Delfade:

1. If when after the 6 hour flight, you get into a quiet room, and notice that your ears are really suffering from the air travel, and realize you don't want to ride on an airplane anymore, how are you going to get home? On a 6-hour plane ride back.

You're going to be trapped.

2. The previous post that the airlines won't let you can't wear the ear protection on takeoff or landing because of the change in air pressure and ear-popping situation, adds another dimension to air travel. It means for x number of minutes, you won't be wearing any ear protection.

So, the solution that ear protection will protect against the loudness of the airplane doesn't exist. Would you be around a 90 dB lawn mower (airplane is 85 dB) for a number of minutes with no ear protection? No way. But that's what you're going to be subjected to in an airplane, during landing and takeoff, with takeoff being the loudest time. 

I would consider a boat, except they would have these life boat emergency drills every now and then, and my room would be right by the alarm that would go off. Or I would have to pass by the alarm on the way to the life boat drill.

And they would have a lot of other loud things.

3. You say you have Bose QC15 anti-noise headphones. Here is what I found out about those by typing that subject into the search engine.

(sum up paragraph[smile]
forbes .com

"Here’s some perspective. The (Bose) QC15s had a maximum noise reduction of around 33 dB, and 20 dB in the all-important bass range (where engine noise mostly resides). This is excellent performance. The (newest model, Bose) QC20s have a maximum noise reduction of 45 dB. This is a staggering amount. This isn’t a marketing number, this is what they performed on objective test equipment (more on this later). And this was at 160 Hz, right where engine noise, road noise, and other low-frequency rumble is. Even at higher frequencies, like 1 and 2 kilohertz (upper end of where most ambient noise happens), the QC20s are still dropping the sound by over 20 dB."

(So newest model of Bose (QC20s) drop jet engine sound by c. 23 to 25 db, we'll guess ("over 20 dB"). Jet is 85 dB. For hyperacusis people, with hearing twice as loud, the jet will sound 170 dB. Bose drops it 25 dB, or down to 145 dB. Even if it dropped it down to 100 dB, you're still in for a loud ride. My opinion.)

_______________________________________________________________________

3. You say you have Bose QC15 anti-noise headphones. Here is what I found out about those by typing that subject into the search engine.


 

 

consumer report:

 

"While there may not be a huge difference between this model's (Quiet Comfrot 3's) noise-canceling prowess and the QuietComfort 2's, a distinction is definitely noticeable. According to Bose, these headphonesare designed to defeat a wider range of frequencies, going up to over 90 decibels; the QuietComfort 2s peaked more in the 84-85db range. We also tried the QuietComfort 15s in the New York City subway system, and they did an impressive job of muffling noise."

"Of course, the only problem is that because these are over-the-ear headphones that offer a tight seal, it can get a bit steamy inside the cups, especially on hot days, though they "breathe" fairly well for over-the-ear headphones. On long plane rides, your skin will also get a bit moist underneath the cushions, so expect to take them off for short periods to give your ears a little air."

(so, expect to take the ear protection off, as noted above, which means more time without ear protection than just loud landings and even louder takeoff's.) 

__________________________________________________________________________

forbes.com

"Bose has been making noise cancelling headphones for a long time, and by the time I reviewed the over-ear QuietComfort 15s, they had gotten to the point where the noise cancelling was measurably and audibly better than the competition."

"It seems Bose learned even more between the QuietComfort 15s and the QuietComfort 20."

"Here’s some perspective. The QC15s had a maximum noise reduction of around 33 dB, and 20 dB in the all-important bass range (where engine noise mostly resides). This is excellent performance. The QC20s have a maximum noise reduction of 45 dB. This is a staggering amount. This isn’t a marketing number, this is what they performed on objective test equipment (more on this later). And this was at 160 Hz, right where engine noise, road noise, and other low-frequency rumble is. Even at higher frequencies, like 1 and 2 kilohertz (upper end of where most ambient noise happens), the QC20s are still dropping the sound by over 20 dB."

[image]
"I recently used the QC20s on a quick flight from LAX-JFK (and back). I found the QC20s comfortable to wear the whole flight, and they dropped the roar of the engines (Boeing BA +0.08%757-200 out, 737-800 back), to about the level of the average open office. Not “silent” of course, they’re not magic, but much quieter than with other headphones."





 

 

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Nemi

Registered:
Posts: 129
Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Delfade,
Are you back from London?  How did it go?
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