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Pamela

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello!

After 4 years of avoiding long conversations, I have been able to get to a point where I can talk with one or two people in a quiet room for an hour. My own voice causes me pain as well as external sounds. I find I am not speaking coherently, repeating myself, repeating myself (haha), and saying whatever comes to mind - as if I just need to get the thought out of my head. When the pain begins to be too much, I lose my words and I forget what the speaker’s question was. I thought I was just out of practice with being social, but I think this is more of a brain information processing/speaking issue. Any ideas on what it could be and how I can fix or adapt to it?

Thanks in advance,
Pamela
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Steve2017

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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #2 

I'm not a specialist on some of the different issues people have, but when I had 'H' I retrained my brain to accept common sounds, when years before I thought it was my ears. I never had pain though... Try to focus 'open your mind' when doing simple jobs around the house, see if it might help it all to heal, it helps my 'T', worth a try, but important not to stress, enjoy jobs, smile and compliment your self whenever possible. I think meditating helped me as well - simply sit in the quiet for 20+ mins, think nice thoughts or clear your mind. You need to spend more time speaking to more people though in your case, its good to talk instead of having too much quiet time... 

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s simpson
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Pamela

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve2017

I'm not a specialist on some of the different issues people have, but when I had 'H' I retrained my brain to accept common sounds, when years before I thought it was my ears. I never had pain though... Try to focus 'open your mind' when doing simple jobs around the house, see if it might help it all to heal, it helps my 'T', worth a try, but important not to stress, enjoy jobs, smile and compliment your self whenever possible. I think meditating helped me as well - simply sit in the quiet for 20+ mins, think nice thoughts or clear your mind. You need to spend more time speaking to more people though in your case, its good to talk instead of having too much quiet time... 


Thank you for your advice! Yes, I do believe I need to de-stress more. And I think you nailed it with having more conversations. I only talk for a few minutes a day, if that.

Much appreciated!
Pamela
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Steve2017

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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for nice response - accept noise as a 'friend' get better/stronger 1% each day... look for options how to achieve this...


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s simpson
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BA

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #5 
hi Pamela

not an expert but sufferer here.
I constantly ( and politely ) ask my wife 'not to shout' many times when we chat. She knows she isn't, but accepts I am hyper sensitive to sound.

My personal feeling is that yours sounds combined with something else, not just a sound issue.
I may be wrong here Pamela.

as the child of an alcoholic where you are 'ignored and made to feel unimportant' I have analysed that sometimes my anger at noise is combined with a 'how dare you treat me this way, and be so inconsiderate' which fuels my uncomfortable state.  I have to try to say to myself ' it's not personal' as well. 

the loud sounds are the real kicker, but I know something else is going on  here.

just a thought Pamela, if it doesn't apply to you then no worries 😉   hope things work out for you and all of us.

I hear here try to acclimatize  to sound etc, quite frankly I just have bulk ear plugs and ear protectors on top when I need. I find life flows easier this way and I just get on with it. too many failures at acclimatizing for those moments when needed, I just bang in the ear plugs etc. 
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Pamela

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BA
hi Pamela

not an expert but sufferer here.
I constantly ( and politely ) ask my wife 'not to shout' many times when we chat. She knows she isn't, but accepts I am hyper sensitive to sound.

My personal feeling is that yours sounds combined with something else, not just a sound issue.
I may be wrong here Pamela.

as the child of an alcoholic where you are 'ignored and made to feel unimportant' I have analysed that sometimes my anger at noise is combined with a 'how dare you treat me this way, and be so inconsiderate' which fuels my uncomfortable state.  I have to try to say to myself ' it's not personal' as well. 

the loud sounds are the real kicker, but I know something else is going on  here.

just a thought Pamela, if it doesn't apply to you then no worries 😉   hope things work out for you and all of us.

I hear here try to acclimatize  to sound etc, quite frankly I just have bulk ear plugs and ear protectors on top when I need. I find life flows easier this way and I just get on with it. too many failures at acclimatizing for those moments when needed, I just bang in the ear plugs etc. 


Thank you for your advice, BA! This is quite the coincidence - 20 minutes before I saw your response, I was contemplating why I find a certain person’s voice quite bothersome and I think it’s because this person caused my hyperacusis, so when they speak, I am extra annoyed.

That being said, my issue (after having researched further over the past couple of days) appears to be an overload of sensory input since the part of the brain that processes sound and vision also processes pain, emotions, etc. (from The Brain’s Way of Healing by Norman Doidge). I’m very scattered and unfocused when I speak when my hyperacusis is bad or when there is sound coming from multiple directions. I’m not scattered with my ‘annoying person’ since I’m usually in complete silence with them.

I definitely have to acclimatize to both situations. Thank you again for your response and all the best to you.
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makarakam

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Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #7 
I have had hyperacusis now for three years, and in a first year and a half I also had similar problems with pain from the sound of my voice and other voices, and problems with sound coming from many directions as you describe. Although use of earplugs is not recommended in "normal" situations (that is not extremely loud ones) since it will make sensitivity to sound worse in time, I found that use of musician earplugs (that is the ones which don't block all sound but rather make some frequencies quieter and the whole sound more focused and clear, in a way make it a higher quality since they limit the directions from which it comes from) was very helpful in the beginning - I started with wearing them all the time while speaking to people, then when I got used to it I could start speaking with people without them and after a time (half an hour, hour or so) when I noticed the pain coming again I put them on and after a while now I can speak with almost all people without them (almost all excludes two extremely loud individuals who shout all the time since they have hearing difficulties and which tended to give me headaches even before hyperacousis). I use alpine musician earplugs with three sets of filters, if it is any help. And now I can not only talk with a normal voice but also shout (when I have a good day, it must be added. But still 😉). 
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Pamela

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by makarakam
I have had hyperacusis now for three years, and in a first year and a half I also had similar problems with pain from the sound of my voice and other voices, and problems with sound coming from many directions as you describe. Although use of earplugs is not recommended in "normal" situations (that is not extremely loud ones) since it will make sensitivity to sound worse in time, I found that use of musician earplugs (that is the ones which don't block all sound but rather make some frequencies quieter and the whole sound more focused and clear, in a way make it a higher quality since they limit the directions from which it comes from) was very helpful in the beginning - I started with wearing them all the time while speaking to people, then when I got used to it I could start speaking with people without them and after a time (half an hour, hour or so) when I noticed the pain coming again I put them on and after a while now I can speak with almost all people without them (almost all excludes two extremely loud individuals who shout all the time since they have hearing difficulties and which tended to give me headaches even before hyperacousis). I use alpine musician earplugs with three sets of filters, if it is any help. And now I can not only talk with a normal voice but also shout (when I have a good day, it must be added. But still 😉). 


Thank you, I am encouraged by your improvement! I have to take out my earplug when I talk or the sound of my voice vibrates/reverberates louder (I only wear one on the right side since it’s worse than the left side). I will have to build my tolerance with speaking. Thanks again!
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