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camj55

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Reply with quote  #1 
I personally cannot stand the thought of listening to music or watching tv whatsoever.  Even if it is on very low.  I see that many of you listen to it on low.  So I am wondering what is different about me.  I do not really have amplified sound(until my ears get too bothered) so much as when hearing certain noises, mostly through stereos, speakers, etc, they sound oddly distorted and hurt my ears no matter what the volume.  I can stand to talk to people just fine as long as they are not too loud or there aren't several voices, and do many other things without too being bothered much or the sound being distorted.  Is this a typical H case?  And those with similar symptoms, can you handle being around it from a mental standpoint?  I get very overly anxious to get away from any speakers or anything, and I think I might be overreacting some but I cannot help it.  I have already been set back and would do anything to protect my ears at this point no matter how dumb I might look.  Also, has anyone gone on anti-anxiety meds?  I am wondering if maybe that would help me to calm down some, seeing as I am always on edge when out of my home anymore.
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Cameron
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olms

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Reply with quote  #2 
camj55:

I can relate to watching TV. For the last 5 years or more, the sound is always cut off and I know what is being said through closed caption.

Closed captions are the words at the bottom of the screen that tell what the speaker is saying. It has been very important to me during the last 5 years or more. Do you have closed caption?

As for the volume of anything, I don't feel bad about avoiding any type of sound. I already get enough unwanted sound as it is, when my dog barks, when a horn is honked, when I drop a fork in the kitchen sink, when I ride in my car, when sirens or cars with no mufflers go by.

I don't purposely have to stand around something that's too loud, again, I'm going to get that more than I want, anyway. 

While noise constricts the blood vessels to the ears and hurts them, by denying oxygen to the ear and thus hurting it, then why not use something that expands the blood vessels and puts more oxygen and nutrients to the ear and helps them? I know, it's wild.

I do that by putting a heating pad on my ear. I know, it's wild. It's free, there are no side effects, it's right there near your medicine cabinet. It's called a heating pad. 

I've used one for over 10 years, and it has helped a lot. I know, something that expands your blood vessels to your ears and helps them, rather than something that constricts your blood vessels to your ears (noise, medicine) and hurts them, that's pretty hard to understand.   

                                       Tom

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camj55

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hey Tom,

That is what I do also.  Closed captioning is a very useful tool.  I cannot get into the show as much without sound but it is still enjoyable to me, much more so than if I had it on low.  As for the heating pad, I believe you were the one that recommended it to me several months back, and it does help my ears.  The heat seems to relax and comfort my ears a lot as well as feel very nice.  Spicy food also helps temporarily, which you also turned me towards.  Thanks for the input and best of luck to you.



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Cameron
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olms

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Reply with quote  #4 
Cameron:

Glad to hear you are using the heating pad. Do you have an extended heating pad (22 inches in length), so you can put both ears under the heating pad at the same time to save time? I put one end of the heating pad on the pillow, and wrap the other end around the back of my head, and use part of a lite phone-type book on the top ear to help hold it down. 

With a normal size heating pad, it takes twice as long to treat both ears.

I also moisten the form rubber pad and squeeze it out, for moist heat seems to help more than dry heat.

I try to stay under the heating pad for 30 minutes, but 15 is OK and 5 minutes is better than nothing. After a sound situation, like riding in my car, or worse, I go under the pad as soon as I can after that, to try to start the rebuild up process as soon as I can. To try to get the blood vessels to my ears expanding, rather than contracting, like the noise was doing to them. 

By expanding, the blood vessels are bringing in extra oxygen and nutrients, which they were deprived of to an extent by the noise, to the injured area, in this case, the ears. 

During such a bad time, I often try to use the moist heating pad in the morning, before I'm fully awake, and just lay in bed for 30 or more minutes like I would be doing anyway, as I try to wake up.
At night, same thing, so I'm not really doing anything there, either. Except laying there under the heating pad, which is a lot to me.

(I keep the heating pad plugged in and on or near my bed. I use it for chest pain, back pain, a cramp every know and then, especially when my toes cramp, you people have a lot to look forward to. One night, I even counted up the number of heating pads I need to handle all the places where I'm hurting. I think four will probably do it. I'm going up in a blaze of glory one night. Or I'm going to electrocute myself, I haven't decided.)

Oh, I read on this board that a warm tub bath helps with hyperacusis, as it enlarges all the blood vessels. After that, I realized that did work. I also realized that I had some of my best thoughts and ideas in the bath, again from the blood vessels to the brain.        

During the day, I put hot pickles on my breakfast and lunch. Same thing. Heat, like the heating pad, which expands my blood vessels to my ears from the inside out. (I put the pickles on my breakfast and lunch only, for I noted that with too many pickles, I got stomach problems.)

In addition to sliced hot pickles (I use Wickles brand), I've found that noodle soup (probably chicken soup, also) helps my ears from the heat of the soup, and there's some ingredient in it that helps my ears, so I don't need the hot pickles for lunch that day.

Also, some breakfast sausage has hot spices or hot pickles in it, and serves the same purpose as putting hot pickles on the food. Hot pimento cheese is the same way.      

I can go under the heating pad during the day a time or two or more, if I really want to "man up" and help my ears during a difficult time.

Without the daytime heating pad, that's 4 treatments right there in one day, and I haven't done anything. With the daytime heating pad treatment or two, that's 5 to 6 treatments a day. 

What I'm doing here is getting through life in 3 to 4 hour increments, with the treatments sometimes having 2, 3 or 4 hours of benefits. Then it's almost time for lunch and another treatment. If I can get through one day like that, then 364 more in the same manner, I've made a year out of it. 

On occasion, when I'm having a difficult time and my mind can't stand it, I tell myself, "If your ears are really this bad, then why don't you get under the heating pad?" And I do, because I'm embarrassed. Embarrassed that I've been worrying or complaining for awhile, and I didn't have the energy to moisten the foam rubber insert and cut on the heating pad and put my ears under it.

So my complaining and worrying serves as a reminder: "If you're this worried sick about your ears, you need to get under the heating pad." And I do.   

                                 You asked: "Also, has anyone gone on anti-anxiety meds?  
                                 I am wondering if maybe that would help me to calm down some,
                                 seeing as I am always on edge when out of my home anymore."


One of the problems with that is, that in addition to noise, I've been told medicine also constricts the blood vessels, and makes h worse. But also, not taking needed medicine can make things worse to much worse, so it can be difficult.

So, in addition to the noise and the nervousness from, the medicine itself can make the noise and the situation worse. I think it's best to try and avoid environments that are  noisy and thereby not have to take any anxiety medicine.

Others may have had some experience with anxiety medicine which seems to help them.

Thank you for your comments to my suggestions.

                           Tom


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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
I personally cannot stand the thought of listening to music or watching tv whatsoever.  Even if it is on very low.


camj55,

What your talking about with music and the TV is not hyperacusis, it's misophonia/phonophobia. This can cause whole categories of sounds to bother or hurt regardless of the sound level. It's a limbic and autonomic nervous system response to a sound. I used closed caption a lot in the past when I couldn't listen to the TV. But I've since worked very hard at overcome my sensitivity to the TV and rarely used captioning anymore.

And yes it's treatable just like hypercusis.

John
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camj55

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Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #6 
John

Didn't see your reply until now.  I always thought speakers and their frequencies were worse on my H and that was my problem, but I guess it is partly my mind?  I am starting to listen to music at low levels for therapy once some new speakers come in, and I will see how I respond.

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Cameron
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