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peachoid12

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Reply with quote  #1 
I am a big tea drinker, and always put on my earmuffs when the teakettle is about to whistle. I am interested in knowing whether others do this, too.

At home, I wear earmuffs when vacuuming and when doing something clangy or bangy in the kitchen. The only other time is on garbage and recycling day, when throbbing trucks idle right outside the window. Every now and then my neighbor stomps up the stairs in his rollerblades, which makes a very loud thud, so on go the earmuffs.

These are about the only times I wear ear protection at home (which is a wonderfully quiet city apartment), except if there's a one-off, like a passing fire truck. Even my cats are completely non-meowy. I suspect there are many more sources of house noise from people living in the suburbs or country, or for those who have kids. I am interested in knowing under what circumstances others wear ear protection at home, so anyone else who is interested, please chime in.


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JohnnyD

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Reply with quote  #2 

I only put mine on when i DJ!  The Other night i cahnge me DJ Program and wanted to try something new with my midi controller so just set everything up on my Workstation & was trying to see if i liked the new software, I put my Musicians Ear plugs in (ER-15 rating) the music wasn't even loud and they started to hurt :-( my ears have been some what bad for 3 months. they get better then some loud sound or something with bother them!

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #3 
I used to need to protect indoors with every overhead airplane (about every 2.5 mts starting @5AM & ending at midnight) or passing motorcycle (what is it with those mufflers-NOT?).
I truly felt like someone living in an air-raid bomb-shelter with 'incoming.'
Searing pain, physical & emotional shock, the lack of knowing what any of this meant, my ENT's repeated mantra via his assistant over the phone..."you're normal....your audiogram was excellent..." the lack of words in the English language to describe what I was experiencing so others could understand.
So stressful physically, mentally emotionally as we all know.
After only increasing trouble from trying to live "normally" through this for 3 months,
I moved somewhere specifically for it's walk-in closet, and set up shop in that "room" for a couple months, plus took Neurontin, finally prescribed by an oto-neurologist, to see if it could calm ear-reactivity enough to allow literally frayed ear bone tendons to heal.
After that break from continuous trauma, I weaned off the Neurontin.
During this period, I also did 8 craniosacral sessions and took anti-inflammatories as I exposed myself to the sounds of traffic inside...then outside the house...usually without earplugs.
I began being able to endure beeps...such as that from someone's voice mail...and even the occasional beep of the micro-wave...without intense pain, and eventually without much pain at all.
Continuous low frequency noises (fridge, cooler, heater) had become and continued to be a source of intense ear & nervous system trauma (which would wake me out of sleep as it seemed to 'accumulate' in my ears and system), so one of the most therapeutic things I did was use a 'quiet' space heater vs. rumbling/humming air, and move the fridge to a closed room.
If loud sounds were literally fraying my ear bone tendons, continuous low frequencies seemed to literally be fraying the rest of m nervous system.
Some of my walls have an audible electrical hum of a timer or generator built inside, so, sometimes, but not usually, when I want a break from low frequencies I'll wear Bose when near them for long periods.
And I wear them while vacuuming.
Vacumming used to be totally impossible no matter the ear protection...so to be able to do this, and so many other things, is a miraculous wonder of healing to me.
The low frequency hums are much less bothersome to me now...but it will be further along in my recovery that I would want to add the fridge back into my sound environment.
I think being away from such sounds within my own living space is offering me a break that is helping me to heal.
I do carry plugs/muffs with me when walking outside for incidents where 10 fire trucks & 9 police cars pass with horns blaring and sirens blasting, taking 1 - 5 minutes to pass depending on numbers of trucks needing to make their way through clots of drivers too clueless to know they're supposed to move to the right lane.
This happens about 1 - 2X a day as I commute as a pedestrian (still resting my ears from driving) on single pass connecting a populated area lacking a hospital...to a part of town containing several hospitals.
At those times, I run up to the nearest open shop and at times breathlessly explain to the maitre-dee (sp?!) or office manager that there are sirens outside & I'm recovering from an ear injury.
Usually people are welcoming and understanding.
Sometimes when standing at an endless intersection during high trafic or when I don't have time or ability to duck into a shop I'll put on the plugs or Bose just to cut the stress of wondering if a motorcycle on steroids or a convoy of fire trucks will blast on the scene.
Actually...I think truly being trapped on a centerline of the road with only plugs/ muffs while these emergency vehicles passed might be risking my ears at this stage of healing.
So when I am truly out of reach of any access to indoors while on a commute, I wonder if I'm being fair to myself to take that risk of a giant emergency vehicle brigade.
I pray that this intance does not occur until I'm much further away in time...like at least 6 months or more from now...from my original acute ear injury.
Actually I wish people would stop having emergencies &/or that fire truck horns/emergency sirens could be toned down & that everyone would let them pass in an orderly fashion.
BTW has anyone studied the 'minimum dose' of such sounds that are really necessary for safety, or are these decibles randomly chosen to be as loud as possible without obvious hearing risks to the general population?
But I digress.
Most of the time I nowq am without ear protection, whether inside or outside.


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JohnnyD

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Reply with quote  #4 
sometimes i boil water in a pyrex mesuring cup in the microwave
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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #5 
I boil water in my kettle without the whistle stopper in...& fill the kettle up enough that it's not in danger of boiling dry if I forget about it for a while...also keep the temp on a medium temp which still boils the water but does not threaten to as easily dry the kettle.
If the whistle blew it might sound ok for my ears at this point...but I don't see the need to expose myself to this...it's an alarming sound...& we have so much of that in this world.
Steam bubbling is much more pleasant...and SO much nicer (to my system) than the fierce hum and vibratory quality of the nuke-rowave.
And then there's that beep at the end of the microwave time anyway.
Unless one disables it.

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SandyTH

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Reply with quote  #6 

Peach,

 

I am a tea drinker as well.  In fact, at this very moment, I have a place set for a friend who plans to join me.

 

To answer your question about ear protection in the home - the answer is never.  Not only do I not do it now, I never did.  I never purchased earmuffs and never wore anything more than store bought foam plugs when outside and quickly refrained from using them and opted for my fingers-in-my-ears instead.  This was on the advice of my audiologist and good advice at that.  It prevented any overprotection.  Sound gone, fingers released.

 

I understand how you feel about those garbage trucks and sirens but the truth is, if you would use a sound meter in your home when one of them passed by, it would barely register.  I just had some major construction going on in my home and while it was more than annoying, if I was in a room far away, it too would barely register on a sound meter. 

 

Have you considered disabling the whistle on your kettle?  Have you considered purchasing a kettle without a whistle?  Are you able to microwave the water?  The less you use ear protection, the quicker you will get your life back.  I can think of no reason to have to wear earmuffs inside the home.  I use store bought foam plugs when I blow dry my hair, which is similar to vacuuming as it is so close to the ear.

 

I know you have made tremendous improvement and I very happy for you but at some point, one has to challenge one's ears. 

 

Sandy

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #7 
Sandy, I agree that past an acute stage (if there has been a trauma) it is important to push on the boundaries a bit.
But in terms of a sound meter and some sounds barely registering, this can be beside the point.
Percussion vibes from probably faint hammering through the window caused my eardrums & bones & tendons to respond in ways that hurt me and caused 'reprocussions' - no pun intended - prior to my conscious awareness of sound...or even ability to actually hear the sound.
I would first feel certain symptoms then realize...where's the construction?
And THEN open the curtain and look for the source of intense the ear pain.
Decibles vs. frequency or vibration can be very deceptive.
There is more to this than meets the mind.
That said, I again agree that past a phase of precariousness in the stage of acute physical trauma, it is good to begin doing what is necessary to bolster the system and take baby steps back into sound.

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Guflu

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Reply with quote  #8 
Oh how I love my tea.

I drink it alot, but I use a water boiler. The one I had before said CLICK when it was done, which was no problem. But it was an ugly bugger. So I recently bought a new and very slick water boiler which sais 'beep' when it's ready. First time I heard this I thought 'darn a beep'. But that was it.

Even pre-H I hated the sound of a cettle whistle.

In house I NEVER wear protection. I only wore it once whilst vacuuming, but not anymore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyTH
I know you have made tremendous improvement and I very happy for you but at some point, one has to challenge one's ears. 


I so agree with Sandy here. Challenging my ears/hearing/brain has made my ears tougher and less sensitive and also has reduced the fear to almost zero.

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #9 

A quote from Dr. Charles (Chip) Bering about overprotection comes to mind.  Dr. Bering has treated many patients with hyperacusis, tinnitus, misophonia and phonophobia at what was one of the premiere locations for seeing patients with our challenges.  Here is what he concludes about overprotection.

"Overprotection is wearing hearing protection for sound levels that are not harmful to an individuals hearing, and sound levels that others can easily tolerate."


*******


Here are some things Dr. Bering has written about the use of earplugs, ear muffs and hearing protection with respect to hyperacusis.


"It is my opinion that earplugs/ear muffs is not a good treatment for H."

"The logic is that EXPERIENCING sound allows the brain to HABITUATE to sound."
 
"Wear ear protection ANYTIME you are around sounds above 80db: at work or at play.  DO NOT wear hearing protection for quieter sounds."
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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for that information, Rob, about Dr. Chip's recommendation to wear hearing protection ALWAYS above 80 Db's.
It would be interesting to know...what kinds of sounds are rated @80 Db...so we can get a sense of what that means.
I know there are lists of Db ratings...does anyone have one handy?

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Dan

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Reply with quote  #11 

I'm trying very hard not to wear ear protection for "normal" sound situations (e.g. situations at home which I had no problem tolerating prior to my onset of hyperacusis) for precisely the reason that Dr. Bering stated. This includes driving in a car, which I think is the worst problem for me. When I finally get to the point where I can't stand it, I'll put in 33 dB Noise Reduction Rating (NRR 33) foam earplugs, which helps considerably.

Debbie: here are some links to dB charts of common sounds. It's amazing that many of the things we frequently use at home are close to 80 dB (or exceed it)!

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/education/teachers/common_sounds.asp

http://www.audiologyonline.com/management/uploads/articles/Chasin_January_2008_AudiologyOnline_LoudnessCommonSounds_Addendum_C.pdf


They're pdf files, so you'll need Adobe Reader to view them.

- Dan

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hi Peach,

My answer is as little as possible, I go out of my way to avoid using them.
Doing things in a quieter manner when possible.
But I will use them when absolutely needed.

As far as muffs- I gave up using certain appliances in the kitchen,
like my electric mixer and juicer for the most part, and do things by hand when possible.
I buy juice at the store instead of making my own. Same true with ground coffee.
I usually cover my ear when I run the garbage disposal.
I use muffs if I have to vacuum. (which I do only on rare occassion, when absolutely necessary)
I have not even tried a blow drier, and would not even think of it at this point.

I use muffs during really loud thunderstorms. It is rare, but if they are very loud and and also loud and long lasting, I will use them AS NEEDED
I used to need them for any thunderstorm.

I used to use them to run the dishwasher- (mine is pretty noisy)
(I would put them on and go in another room and close the door)
That was once I could even be in the house when I ran it.
Eventually I got to where I could just go in another room, farthest from it, and close the door.

I will use them if and when necessary when there is loud lawn equipment or other such loud stuff that is too much for me, Running outdoors. (Even though I am inside at the time.)
Though I have found that I am able to tolerate some of those sounds MUCH better, as of the past couple "mowing seasons" it just depends on how loud and close they really are.
And also how long they are "ongoing" and if they are just in one location, like out back.

It is easier to change rooms and be more comfortable soundwise when the sound is not coming from all directions.

Some of the sounds of mowers and nearby construction used to literally drive me out of the house with little sleep and hardly anything to eat. Fewer things did that in the past couple of years. (which also coincides to not long after I started doing some things that have been helping me to improve my tolerances to sound)
But I still usually have to find the quieter area of the house to be in, it all depends on which side of the house they are on. It is hard when they are running in different areas at one time.
(Also, As Debbie mentioned sometimes the vibration and low frequency sound are also a concern, for me as well)

I go out of my way to avoid using hearing protection, at home and elsewhere.
And only use it when really necessary though.
Sometimes I will just leave, as that gets me away from the sound.
If it is way too loud outdoors I will put my muffs on as I head for the car.
I can also seek shelter in my basement as the ground tends to be a fairly good insulator against sound. So it is quieter.

With the garbage truck, it used to be more difficult- then I found that if I could be in a different room, as they came by - the extra walls in between can help- sound seems to come through glass, even when windows are closed, and there are alot of windows in my house.
I have noticed recently it is not as bad as it used to be though, and sometimes I don't need to go to a different room, or even cover my ears, when they come by.
but different trucks can be noisier than others too.

Sometimes for noise from outdoors, it can help a bit to close the curtains too.
(Though I do not have curtains on all my windows and it would probably help if I did)

I used to need muffs to be in the kitchen at times, like if there was lawn equipment running at a neighbors out back, and i needed to be in the kitchen. The way my kitchen is set up if I am at the sink in particular, the sound coming from out back is Very noticeable- but I just got to the point that when that is the case I spend VERY little time in the kitchen, And I discovered that for me, ice cream is fast food :-)

I have used my muffs at times around the 4th of July.
I used to have to sit in my basement with them on, last year I was able to just hang out in the basement, without having them on.

I think it was Sandy that may have said to me at one time
"It's not that loud" or something very similar.
As I was talking about Some of the sound that comes in from outside.
Those words had a Really Good and lasting effect on me,
as the low freq. or other sounds filtered in- even waking me up at times,
I would think about that, and realize she was right. They are not that loud.
Yes they are difficult for me, but if I could tolerate them a little, or go to another area of the house- further away......or last year I even tried putting on some music, on low volume - as some of those sounds that were "not really that loud" were filtering in from outdoors.
And to my total amazement that helped for me.
So to realize that some of those sounds are "not that loud" did help me, though even Some sounds that are not that loud can at times be REALLY difficult for my hearing.

Debbie,

I am also sensitive to low freq. as well as vibration from heavy equipment, lawn mowers etc. (even when they are fairly distant)-

I have woken up with my hearing being more sensitive,
and had to figure out what was going on. As at times the sound is very faint or barely noticeable.
Sometimes it has been more noticeable and louder, closer, other times I have had to listen VERY carefully to find where it is coming from. I have had to open the door at times and step outside to figure it out, or open a window and listen carefully.
Sometimes going to a room in another part of the house helps.
I found if I sleep through it, or continue sleeping through some of those sounds, it can be very difficult for my hearing.
So I wind up getting up instead. That helps- as many times they are coming from the direction that is most noticeable from where I am sleeping.
That has also been true of the sound of lawnmowers at a neighbors house , even a distant neighbors- sleeping through it- has been known to leave my hearing more sensitive.


There is something else, I wonder about though- and that is for those who get setbacks,
sometimes the sounds that can cause them do not have to be loud.
I can see that if someone experiences a touch of momentary pain or a spike in T or an increase in their hearing sensitivity, that is short lived- Maybe hearing protection is more of an option under more circumstances. But for those who get setbacks, I wonder if protecting our hearing in ways that are necessary, WHEN absolutely necessary for us- is a bit different?

Though as I have found, protecting my hearing in ways that are appropriate and necessary for me, and using hearing protection are not always the same thing!
AS what I am able to tolerate, overall, in the way of sound improves, what I can tolerate in the way of the sounds that used to be difficult improves as well. Less sounds are as difficult for me. And some I can be around longer than before, before it becomes As difficult for my hearing/ears.

I rarely  use my muffs anymore. For the most part, I just try to avoid being around the sound if and when necessary- weather that means going to a different part of the house, leaving or whatever.
Many times it is as Sandy mentions,-

.....and never wore anything more than store bought foam plugs when outside and quickly refrained from using them and opted for my fingers-in-my-ears instead......

Though I did wear my muffs, when I needed to but found that I can
cover my ears with my hands in many cases instead, and that works very well for me.  In MANY cases. Eneough that it is difficult for me to remember the last time I used my muffs.

Rob,

I agree with Debbie- thanks for letting us know Dr. Chip's thoughts on this.

but about this-
"Overprotection is wearing hearing protection for sound levels that are not harmful to an individuals hearing, and sound levels that others can easily tolerate."

I realize that some levels of sound may not be said to be technically "harmful" to one's hearing- (as-in the sound level would not, or should not, cause hearing loss)
but how about sound levels that can cause setbacks for someone?
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #13 
Debbie,

you mentioned-
Some of my walls have an audible electrical hum of a timer or generator built inside, so, sometimes, but not usually, when I want a break from low frequencies I'll wear Bose when near them for long periods.

With being sensitive to the low freq. sound and using the bose at times as you mentioned -
I wonder, Do you ever listen to anything, like something pleasant on low volume while you have them on? Or are you not up to listening to music or anything else though headphones yet?
I still have not tried headphones, for music or anything else, Yet.

But I have thought of that, for me, that maybe it would help in some cases- to block a little of the external noise- and also allow me to listen to something pleasant at the same time. (though I  still need to get some good headphones.....)
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charlenef

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Reply with quote  #14 

I use mine to ding the toaster use the food processer or when my hubby is vaccuming the other room that im not in. it is way to loud for me if im not another room with the door shut.also i use ear muffs if there is a loud truck running outside for awhile.I use my ear plugs to go on the computer because it made me suffer a relaps a few yrs ago from the fan running

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi aQB, that's a good point, I think there may be degrees of distress/nervous system intolerance of continuous low frequencies.
In the past I would have said, 'nope. Those sounds are poison. Don't care what sugar they're mixed with - my auditory & nervous systems say, NO!'
Now after months of slow recovery, I am returning to resiliancy.
Just in the last few days I did buy a pair of VERY inexpensive headphones & am listening to limited periods of low volume, classical music with especially higher frequencies...to see how this may neutralize low-frequency-based nervous/auditory system trauma.
Am trying it both during and following exposures to evaluate the effect of balancing these exposures.
Modern industrial culture injects continuous, low to high volume, low frequency hums & bursts of high volume, high frequencies...as in the ubiquitous 'beeps' and alarms.
I am exploring the potential effects of 'frequency' therapies to bring back resiliance to the system which may be physiologically stressed by these unnatural extremes.

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Maree

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Reply with quote  #16 
I'm in the opposite situation as I have touch sensitivity to my ears as well as sound sensitivity. Wearing ear protection of any sort has been a long term battle for me.

I've reached the point where I can wear headphones for 2 hours per day in 30 min chunks, if I can distract myself from them. But that has taken 12 months. I still have to find the courage to tackle ear buds or ear plugs.


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JenMcK

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Reply with quote  #17 
I don't suffer from H.  But I know it's not good to overprotect, yet I do it because I don't have much of a choice.  I live in an apartment with very thin walls.  You can hear people speaking constantly and they'll say words that start with (or contain) the letter P, which as you all know, drives me like crazy.  So I wear my earplugs a lot.  I'm afraid to take them out, kind of like Linus without his blanket.  Just seeing P words bothers me (which might sound weird).  Whenever I come on here, I see words like "therapy" and it turns me off to this forum.  Or seeing words like "Champagne" or "Pine" etc.  You know how when you're reading words, you say hear (or say) them in your head?  Like if you're looking at a sign or whatever. 

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi Charlene,

you mentioned-

I use my ear plugs to go on the computer because it made me suffer a relaps a few yrs ago from the fan running

Thankfully not everything that caused my hearing to become more sensitive, or that caused a setback for me in the past does that these days.
For me it has been important to realize that too. In part because otherwise I may be trying to protect my hearing from alot of sounds and situations that I do not need to. And I may also wind up being alot more cautious around sounds that I do not need to be concerned about, or as concerned about anymore.
For me it is important to be able to keep moving foreward, and to realize that sounds that used to be more challenging,  in many cases are easier For Me to tolerate.  Even some that were pretty difficult- in some cases have gotten easier- they may still be challenging, but maybe to a different degree.
 
 As I work on improving my tolerances, in ways that I have found to be helpful For Me,  I keep noticing gradual improvement. And thankfully the rest of the world does not sound as loud as it used to, to me.

About your computer though- If you think it may still be that much of a problem for you, have you thought about getting a new computer?
I have heard some of the new ones are pretty quiet. There was a thread about that, awhile back.......

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi Maree,

you mentioned-
I'm in the opposite situation as I have touch sensitivity to my ears as well as sound sensitivity. Wearing ear protection of any sort has been a long term battle for me.

I've reached the point where I can wear headphones for 2 hours per day in 30 min chunks, if I can distract myself from them. But that has taken 12 months. I still have to find the courage to tackle ear buds or ear plugs.


What kind of headphones have you been able to use- are they the full sized ones- or the lighter weight ones that sit on the ear?

To be able to use hearing protection when necessary is really important- hope you can figure something out.
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #20 
Lots of wisdom in Sandy's post.   
 
If we wear hearing protection at home, it's important to make it our business to find a knowledgeable clinician who can help to teach us about hyperacusis and phonophobia and how to treat them.  No one with hyperacusis should ever wear hearing protection at home, except when vacuuming or using some types of blow dryers.  The reason we believe hearing protection is necessary for many of these other things is because we have developed phonophobia.  This is not the same thing as hyperacusis.  It is a separate, but associated, challenge.  
 
We shouldn't wear hearing protection when making tea, when doing something in the kitchen, when a truck passes by outside, when a neighbor stomps up the stairs,  If the sound made by a refrigerator causes a 'trauma', we are not describing hyperacusis.  We are describing phonophobia.  If driving creates a problem and we are in some form of therapy, then we are not doing the right therapy and should consider finding a clinician who can help us.  If we have hyperacusis and are not using desensitization therapy, we need to get off the fence.  If we are very, very lucky, the problem will improve by letting time go by.  For most of us, letting time pass will not help us and we need to purposefully take the necessary steps to reclaim our tolerance for sound.
 
Rob    
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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi Rob, I agree we should develop a systematic, and supported, structure to challenge sound sensitivities & recognize phonophobia.
But medicine does not really understand everything about auditory distress.
While phonophobia and misophonia must be considered at each step of the process of recovery, I believe that the limbic-autonomic axis does not explain every non-hyperacusis symptom of pain, distress, or setback.
That said, the limbic connections with physical auditory and other physical distress symptoms may be more profoundly related to physical health than we tend to think or that traditional treatments address.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #22 
Dear Rob and Sandy,

I am curious about what your thoughts are, about using hearing protection around loud/noisy appliances- in the kitchen. I have given up using them (noisy appliances) for now, opting for quieter ways to go about things. But after what I am able to tolerate in the way of sound improves more -
I wonder- is it still beneficial to avoid using hearing protection- whenever possible?

Some electric appliances in the kitchen-such as a Blender,  mixer, food processor, coffee grinder,  juicer (the kind that does fruits and veggies- not just citrus) , and other noisy appliances.... can be pretty loud,
and when they are used, one is in close proximity to them.
(so it can't be run from across the room) and Other people would very likely consider them noisy/loud. 
And it could be very hard to just cover my ears, with my hands in order to use them.
Though like my vacuum cleaner, I used to be able to use them without hearing protection.

Once I can handle more in the way of sound, though-
I wonder, in your opinions- are those items that I should still avoid using if and when possible - rather than use hearing protection if necessary for them?
I don't know specifically how loud they are, I don't even have a sound meter- but my guess is others would think are loud,-
But I wonder,  would I be better off, even after my hearing recovers more- to continue doing things in a quieter manner, whenever possible,  in order to avoid using  hearing protection if it would otherwise be necessary?

Like Sandy mentions, To Peach,  about the tea kettle-

Have you considered disabling the whistle on your kettle?  Have you considered purchasing a kettle without a whistle?  Are you able to microwave the water?  The less you use ear protection, the quicker you will get your life back.

I know there sometimes there are quieter ways to do things.
I miss my juice and home ground coffee sometimes though.

And I wonder what the general thinking is - about appliances in the kitchen?
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #23 
Debbie,

You mentioned something about listening to some classical music that emphasizes the higher frequencies-

Just in the last few days I did buy a pair of VERY inexpensive headphones & am listening to limited periods of low volume, classical music with especially higher frequencies...to see how this may neutralize low-frequency-based nervous/auditory system trauma.
Am trying it both during and following exposures to evaluate the effect of balancing these exposures.


As far as listening to music, I never tried anything special like you mention- just selections that I like, that I could listen to- in ways that were and are  appropriate for me. And the music I listened, and still listen to was (and is) special though -
it happens to be music I like. :-)
So as far as music goes, I think that one could just as easily listen to what they find pleasing, and tolerable. (I don't think it would need to be specially processed or designed in some way- other than being of high quality.)
Like if one enjoys classical- find what one can listen to that is tolerable and pleasing.
And enjoy it. But that is just my opinion.
By the way, some of what I listen to would not really be termed "classical" (More like "classic rock") but it does have an orchestrated/classical type sound to some of it. And it sounds good to me.

I am not so sure that listening to music with the high end frequencies will help balance anything as far as tolerance to the lower ones goes though.

But I think with music, in general,  if we can find something that is pleasing and tolerable for us on an individual basis, to listen to, I think that is a good thing.
(I spent a long time not being able to listen to music, and I really apprieciate it, and  enjoy it now)

And if there is a way to listen to music, that we enjoy - in a way that is not just pleasing and tolerable to us, but will overtime help us improve our tolerances to sound- I think that is wonderful. And from I can tell, it's pretty possible too.
To be able to listen to some of my favorite music, and have it have the wonderful effects I have noticed, sometimes seems like a dream come true.
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Reply with quote  #24 
Hi aQB, yes, I think I understand what you mean. Listening to 'normal' stuff...enjoyable stuff...is really nice to get back to & use in order to further increase tolerances.
As for the higher frequencies...for me, this is something (such as bird songs) which I sensed would help me when I was 'drowning' in hyperacusis & pain.
But my normal ability to hear those 'nourishing' sounds was drowned out by the competing roar of traffic and overhead planes.
I craved dynamic, variable sounds...and realized...nature seems to provide such dynamism best.
Continuous mechanical hums...I realized only then how this infusion blankets & dulls the natural sound dynamics around us.
I don't know what it might offer me in terms of healing...but notice that am really enjoying hearing more of these tones and also beautiful classical music.
So, as you suggest, it's a good thing either way in that sense.

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Dan

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aQuieterBreeze
And I wonder what the general thinking is - about appliances in the kitchen?


I bet a number of appliances in the kitchen can generate sound in excess of 80 dB, which is the level at which ear protection should supposedly be worn, even for "normals." A few that I'd be concerned with: blender, food processor, dishwasher, garbage disposal, vacuum cleaner. Of course, another issue is exposure time.

- Dan
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #26 
Dan,
 
It's not the case.  Other than a vacuum cleaner, none of these items generate sounds at 80 dB or higher.  Hearing protection can be a slippery slope.  The key to hyperacusis is to let sound in, not to keep it out.  The auditory system thrives on sound.  It expects it and it needs it.  The more attached we become to earplugs, no matter how satisfying that may feel or necessary we think it is, the more we head down a slippery slope.  When we allow the use of hearing protection to become the new normal, we're taking a step toward fear of sound.     

*******
 
Breeze,
 
You.  An audiologist.  LDL exam.  Soon. 
 
Please do yourself a favor.  This is the best suggestion I could give you.  As for hearing protection around kitchen appliances, never.
 
Let me give you an image to associate with hearing protection.  Earplugs to a hyperacusic is like heroin to a junkie.  I realize that's a harsh image.  But the fact is that no hyperacusic who is receiving the proper help from a knowledgeable clinician would ever rely on them around normal, non-harmful levels of sound.  The approriate times to use them are when we are around sound that would be considered too loud for non-hyperacusics. 
 
Rob 
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Dan

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob
Dan,   It's not the case.  Other than a vacuum cleaner, none of these items generate sounds at 80 dB or higher.  Hearing protection can be a slippery slope.  The key to hyperacusis is to let sound in, not to keep it out.  The auditory system thrives on sound.  It expects it and it needs it.  The more attached we become to earplugs, no matter how satisfying that may feel or necessary we think it is, the more we head down a slippery slope.  When we allow the use of hearing protection to become the new normal, we're taking a step toward fear of sound.


Even before my problem with hyperacusis started, my blender sounds much louder than my vacuum cleaner.

As I said earlier in this thread, I try not to wear earplugs for "normal" sound situations. However, if an appliance has a very loud motor, is there harm in wearing ear protection when operating that equipment?

- Dan
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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #28 
Hi Rob,
According to an otoneurologist I spoke with by phone - one very experienced in hyperacusis -
"'a stressed auditory system' might appreciate the break"
from certain sounds.
We were not discussing - nor considering - the topic of hearing protection but rather discussing eliminating certain sounds (such as fridge and driving) from the daily environment.
And, we happened to be discussing this during a relatively early phase of months following an injury caused by a noise accident.
Hearing protection can certainly cause problems.
But a time of rest may also be indicated.
So the question becomes, when a break from environmental exposures is impossible, is hearing protection more a means of auditory 'rest' or auditory stress?
I would say, in the best of all possible worlds, a rest from problematic sounds, eliminating a need for earplugs & their deleterious effects, can be appropriate and even help to anchor and speed recovery.

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #29 
Dan,

Please believe me that it can be, and often is, a very slippery slope.  The more the use of hearing protection becomes normal to us, the more we tend to rely on it.   

Debbie,

The sounds made by a refrigerator do not come remotely close to exceeding normal volumes.  The same is true for driving.  Think this through with me for a minute.  For a very small period after an aural trauma, when hyperacusis presents, a period of resting one's ears may very well be appropriate.  But if you look at the comments in this thread, folks aren't talking about that.  They're talking about 'a new normal'.  And they are describing it as if it is the most normal thing in the world.  I'm as sure as I can be that if we don't assiduously guard against it, we will end up dealing with two challenges - that is, hyperacusis and phonophobia (or misophonia). 

Rob
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charlenef

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Reply with quote  #30 

I did get a quieter computer but I'm laying down in my bed with my laptop and the fan is next to my ear. It is really not that loud but after a few minutes the continual running bothers me. The last time it hurt my ear it was a good 6 months before sounds became quieter.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #31 
Dear Charlene,

You mention-
    
I did get a quieter computer but I'm laying down in my bed with my laptop and the fan is next to my ear. It is really not that loud but after a few minutes the continual running bothers me.

Sometimes it can help to think about how we do things,
and be able to do things in a different manner.....
(For example,  I do not have to be in my kitchen when the dishwasher is running,
There is a carpet sweeper, that is non motorized, that I have used at times instead of a vacuum. I can try to go to quieter restaurants, or stores - instead of ones I know will be too loud.
Like using quieter ways to do some things in my kitchen,  I have found there are alot of things I can do, to avoid using hearing protection,  as I also work on trying to improve my tolerance to sound.)

Why do you lay in bed, with the computer and it's fan so close to your ear?

Is there a better or different position for you to use it in?
If you are not using it at the time, can it be turned off- or set elsewhere?

I understand a little bit about setbacks.
Thankfully  many of the things that were difficult for me before, are not as difficult anymore-
that is because I have been working on improving my tolerances in many ways though.
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Reply with quote  #32 

Hi Breeze,

 

I can't add anything to what Rob has already written in a few of his posts in this thread.  He is absolutely right regarding the information he is offering to everyone.

 

I asked Peach these questions:

 

Have you considered disabling the whistle on your kettle?  Have you considered purchasing a kettle without a whistle?  Are you able to microwave the water? 

 

........................

 

I felt wearing those heavy duty ear muffs was more harmful to her than listening to a whistling teakettle but felt quite sure she wouldn't hear me so I went the more gentle route and made those suggestions.  I absolutely do not think it is necessary to protect one's ears against a whistling teakettle or for that matter the garbage disposal or any other kitchen appliance.   From the time the kettle actually boils and starts to whistle and the amount of time it takes to turn it off is negligible.   I feel that way about the blender as well. 

 

Breeze, you are so kind and helpful to so many and offer so much encouragement and support, please do yourself a favor and turn all that attention toward yourself while allowing others to support you. 

 

Sandy

 

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charlenef

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Reply with quote  #33 

I lay in bed because I cant sit in a chair  for more than 10 min and that is painful due to other health problems. So I am stuck I really dont leave the house either besides Dr appts either.All at the ripe old age of 39!

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #34 
Rob & Sandy, and all, including me, who wish to help others release from the clutches of hyperacusis and the limiting behaviors it can cause;
I hear your devotion to the common good and respect it very much.
And overall, I agree with your points.
I offer that decible level is not the only feature of sounds that matter.
There is a reason that 'certain' softer sounds are problematic for some people (by 'softer sounds' I'm talking in relation to hyperacusis, not misophonia).
By 'problematic' I mean causing physical responses including aural fullness, elevations in tinnitus, nausea, pain etc. that other sounds of identical decible levels don't.
I believe that the reason behind this are likely differences in the ways various types of sound are physically received and processed.
Although such symptoms are often highly unsettling and distressing, I do not think that limbic involvement necessarily or even probably comes first.
The symptoms seem to begin as an unlikely, even unbelievable surprise, and the person's lifelong attitude to the probematic sounds was usually utterly neutral or even positive.
The only difference being...an intervening stress to the auditory system.
I believe, as Rob reflected back in terms of specific phases of recovery...that there is merit in giving the body a break when these physical distress signals are clear and strong.
And I believe that a systematic process of recovery is necessary to climb out.
Perhaps...no matter the distance from one's initial trauma (if there was an identifiable one) it is helpful to go back and do some 'ealy phase' heaing steps if they were not done at the time.
I am a sample of one, but in my case, the combination of a relative break (for several months) and various, systematic treatments has brought me to a point where as I now return to these sounds they amazingly no longer cause the previous symptoms.
I thoroughly agree that we must get the help and healing tools to move past hyperacusic and auditory stress limits to the degree we physically can.
Everyone is different.
I did not happen to do Pink Noise, White Noise or TRT.
I took a different route.
I am much improved.
Like many, my own voice and literally a paperclip falling to a wood floor hurt my ears.
Now, I listen to music, TV, radio, phone, direct conversation, and background environmental sounds literally all day long.
After months of struggling to move past intense pain, category 4 hyperacusis, screaming tinnitus, and so much else, I am about 75% improved, and still moving forward.
There are evidently various roads to recovery.
Pink Noise and TRT are a couple of potentially helpful options, and not the only ones.
I think it is helpful to others to let them know about the existence of approaches beyond pink and broadband noise, which may be used concurrently to these approaches or with different approaches entirely.
And I think it's important to take seriously any given person's experience with sound...no matter the 'sense' it makes on a decible meter.
The assesment of a systematic treatment should be the degree to which it seems to address a person's concerns and whether the problematic sounds begin to be easier and finally comfortable, and a person also begins to feel renewed empowerment in life.
I think that a sense of resolution and empowerment is important to any form of physical healing.
Baby steps, if need be, and comfort beyond hearing protection can both bolster empowerment and accelerate actual healing.
As can helping one another challenge limiting beliefs, while regularly questioning our own.

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #35 

I will also offer once again that decible level is not the only feature of sounds that matter.

 

…….

 

Two aspects of sound are extremely relevant.  The decibel (dB) level is very important, as well as the frequencies that pertain to a given sound.  Let’s imagine someone named ‘Joe’ who has hyperacusis.  Joe’s LDLs reveal that he is extremely sensitive to sounds with frequencies from 6 kHz and above.  He is somewhat sensitive to sounds from 3 kHz to 5 kHz.  And he is barely sensitive to sounds in a frequency range below that.  Based on this, we know if a given sound includes frequencies from 6 kHz or higher, they would not need to be very loud for Joe to experience pain when hearing them.  But if Joe heard a sound that covered a bandwidth of, 100 Hz to 2 kHz which was just as loud as the sound that caused him to feel pain, he would be fine.

 

………


I believe that the reason behind this is likely differences in the ways various waves of sound are received and processed.

 

……..

 

That’s true.  Another way to put it is that the brain is processing sound differently than it used to.  In Joe’s case, for instance, he has a very difficult time processing sound which contains frequencies from 6 kHz or higher.  At much lower frequencies, Joe’s brain processes sound fairly close to the way it used to.

 

……..


Although such physical symptoms are often highly unsettling and distressing, I do not think that limbic involvement necessarily or even probably comes first.

 

……..

 

If a person has hyperacusis, you may be right.  Jastreboff believes decreased sound tolerance has two aspects – hyperacusis and the emotional component which he refers to as misophonia. 

 

……..


We must get the help and healing tools to move past them to the degree we physically can, and everyone is different.

 

……..

 

My view on this is a little different.  Yes, it’s true that we’re all different.  But when most folks are working with a knowledgeable clinician in a desensitization program suited to their needs and tolerance, they can recover their tolerance.    

 

……..


So far I did not happen to do Pink Noise, White Noise or TRT.  I took a different route.

 

………

 

What approach have you tried that has been helpful to you?

Rob

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #36 
Dear Charlene,

I hope you can find a way to get better, I am sorry to hear about your health problems.

But about your computer?
Even though you say-

I lay in bed because I cant sit in a chair  for more than 10 min and that is painful due to other health problems.

 I still wonder why -
you lay in bed with the laptop and its fans next to your ear?

you mentioned-
....... I'm laying down in my bed with my laptop and the fan is next to my ear.
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JenMcK

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Reply with quote  #37 
Rob, I was wondering, are you a Doctor or specialist of some sort?  You always seem to know so much about sounds and sound sensitivities, etc. 

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charlenef

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Reply with quote  #38 

if you put a lap top on a pillow to prop it up it is about a foot and a 1/2 away from my ear on the same level.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #39 
Charlene, Are you sitting up when you use your computer?

If so, have you thought about using a tray, like the kind used to serve "breakfast in bed"  or a specially designed table where the top part could sit over the bed and perhaps be adjusted as far as height?

Also,  I wonder if  using a laptop propped up on a pillow, may cause it to run hotter than normal? 
But I don't know much about laptops.
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charlenef

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Reply with quote  #40 

It might run hotter but the trays dont work ive had 2 and I dont like them they are too bulky.I lay when im on the computer sitting dosent work for me the pain is too much.Thanks for all the replies and answers.

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Debbie

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Reply with quote  #41 
Hi Rob, thanks for that explanation.
And thank you for asking what I have tried that I feel has been helpful to me.
I first tried living life normally, encountered sound blasts I was not ready for while healing from an initial injury (and having rested and spontaneously recovered sveral times,
got worse, entered chronic, category 4 hyperacusis and unbelievable pain and various other disturbing non-hyperacusis ear symptoms.
Then I reluctently tried Neurontin; I'm not a drug-oriented person.
The Neurontin was prescribed by an oto-neurologist who thought (based on my pain quality and pattern) that maybe the stapedial and other tendons were actually straining (tearing) with loud sounds and settling the reflex a bit might provide physical healing time for the tendons.
I took this for about 2.5 months.
At the same time, I moved to have a break from my loud cooler/heater system and moved the refrigerator to a closed room.
I also refrained from driving, as the beep of the ignition felt like a gun going off in my ear, and the rev of the engine felt like someone taking a razer and slicing a layer of, then pulling off some critical part in my middle ear.
So I gave myself a break from some of the most distressing of the low frequency noises.
The house ones had begun to cause mounting aural fullness and nervous system distress that would wake me in shaking trauma that felt like nervous shock.
Several weeks later, when I could still hear neighbor's lawn care activities through ear plugs and Bose while having taken up residence in my new walk-in closet, I then started a series of craniosacral sessions.
The therapist came to me, so I did not have to drive and 'rip out' my ear on the way there & back...in other words...so I could absorb the benefits of the treatment.
Craniosacral therapy provides both physical and emotional support, and is also thought to be especially helpful for childhood ear infections and head/ear/body/emotional conditions.
I know the progress I then made was due to a combination of time/space/opportunity to heal. After several weeks (about 5 sessions between craniosacral and osteopathic-style approaches), I was able, with earplugs, to be with a family gathering and kids pounding on the piano.
Also, at the same time I began taking cox-2 inhibitors made from herbs like ginger and turmeric.
I feel these may have really made a difference too as I would impatiently push myself, end up 'overdoing it,' come back from somewhere groaning in pain, and seem to recover easier with the anti-inflams.
Also I took vitamans A, C, E & cal/magnesium.
After a couple of months and a total of of 8-9 craniosacral sessions and 2 osteopathic-style sessions,
I was able to almost never wear ear protection.
I stopped the treatments to conserve resources and also stopped taking Neurontin, in that case to 'see where things really were'.
It turned out I no longer needed the Neurontin at all.
My pain issues were largely gone.
Over the next 2 months...'til now, I have continued to improve.
After a 6-month music/radio/TV/fast, and sparing phone use, with terrible resurgences of symptoms if I tried to cross that picket line, I began
to do all these things again.
Now I have my nature CD or music and the radio on at once, full volume, all day if I want. And I can watch TV for any amount of time.
Regular-volume beeps seem ok for me, I can sit in Kinkos with their copiers and computer for any amount of time.
I entered a gym the other day...someone dropped a weight...it was fine but I'm not quite up for repeated impacts like that over the course of an hour.
I still have a ways to go.
I'm hesitant to go on long runs near heavy traffic or take up cycling...I'm not yet up for the unexpected blaring honks, motorcycles, siren brigades, that would accrue over hours and days in those situations.
I am not yet driving frequently.
I've taken a break from all therapies yet continue to improve.
I may try Pink Noise...I am considering my next 'systematic' moves.
When I have more resources I'll do another round of craniosacral therapy.
I really think it helped my resiliance. It certainly provided a space to unwind the accumulated shock in my system from the ear injuries.
I think it is very distressing (don't need to say this) to undergo severe auditory shock, repeated in smaller doses daily and nightly.
It's like shock from a torture experience, or a rape, or being beat to a bloody pulp, miraculously surviving, and crawling for help.
The immediate shock then causes more shock as the physical system and the emotions try to make sense of it all.
I believe even old, 'forgotten' traumas can hang on in the body...and maybe for some of us, can also contribute to vulnerabilities in immunity or resiliancy on some level.
Maybe for some of us, such accumulated physical and/or limbic trauma set the stage for physical vulnerability...such as to auditory distress or anything else.
I believe treatments such as craniosacral therapy can help allow us to safely face and let go of the impact of accumulated stressors.
And I believe it may also intervene physically on some profound level.
In any case, I have improved about 75% overall...today an entire crew dug up my yard and used leaf blowers...and I am fine.
I will leave for a while, on the other hand, on the day they use some giant monster power tool they mentioned they are waiting for.
I don't know what it is, but it sounds like something I'd rather try out...some other time.
This decision may be phonophobia, but I think actually it's just me not wanting to be exposed to that 'lawn work on steroids' sound while I'm still testing my boundaries in a gradual manner.
I am only now looking into sound therapies.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #42 
Rob,

I read your thoughts before- about sound meter- and that is why I never bought one.
But I still think kitchen appliances can be loud-

But, I also avoid using hearing protection- whenever absolutely possible.
I read some thoughts about that awhile back, and they helped to me to make a Very conscious decision to avoid using it, whenever possible.
And for me that has been something that has helped me alot.
I consider it one of the 2 best things I have done- the other is to use sound in ways that are helpful for me. (and one of those "ways" does involve allowing sound in when possible)
Though there are times I should have had hearing protection with me, like the restaurant I went to-
that was too much for my hearing - though my better option would have been to request that they turn the sound down.
And also the funeral- but I did not have hearing protection with me to use, when they played a song, Stairway to Heaven, that was too loud and too much for me. But I was grateful for the alcove I was able to stand in, as it put a thick wall directly between me and the speakers. If they had faded it out at the end of the more acoustic part in the beginning though, I may have been all right, without having the alcove there. Hands placed over my ears, works very well for me in many cases.

And as what I can handle in the way of sound improves, and when my hearing is not "more sensitive" than it normally is (as I take a bit of extra care at times, though I still avoid using hearing protection when possible) - But normally these days, I  try to endure being around sound at least at times, that is more on the edge, of being difficult for my hearing, if it is not loud- like the lawn mowers last summer, when the sound was not that loud inside my house, but there is also a point, when it still becomes too much for me to be around.
And Sometimes when they are close, it really is loud- inside my house. Other people would say it was loud too.
Sometimes that edge, of what I can tolerate - is a fairly fine line, and sometimes a thicker one.  And that line keeps moving, in a positive direction, as what I can handle in the way of sound improves. And for me I realize, in order to recover- I need to know that line moves, and I need to move with it- so to speak.
(and Rob, I would really like to know if you can think of some ways or if you have some ideas that may be helpful for me, that I may be able to use improve my tolerances to sound, especially  for those lower frequencies, that I can work on before the next mowing season. (I have been thinking about asking about that recently anyway.) They mow from sun-up to sundown in my area sometimes, and have road construction planned as well- for an area not too far away.)


As far as the LDL's I understand, and know it could be helpful for me to know what mine are.  But I wonder if just any audiologist would know the proper method and ways to administer that test. If one of the clinicians on those lists I have seen, was in my area
(listed as being trained by Dr. Jastreboff or perhaps on the list you posted - as being very knowledgeable about treating hyperacusis) I would feel alot more confident and reassured about having it done.

Your image of what hearing protection is like for someone with hyperacusis is a vivid one.
 And I will keep what you say in mind- and let my appliances sit idle for now and keep working on improving my tolerances to sound.
 But if a Loud severe thunderstorm shows up, I won't promise not to grab my muffs if it is too much for me. (You also should know, I actually enjoy watching the "light show" that a storm can bring, but sometimes the thunder really is LOUD, and sometimes long lasting.)Though, as I think I mentioned before, for most storms I found I can now just cover my ears when necessary.)
 
And thank you, for your explaination here and also in another thread  not long back, about the db level and frequency of sound.
You mentioned-

Two aspects of sound are extremely relevant.  The decibel (dB) level is very important, as well as the frequencies that pertain to a given sound......

As always you have my gratitude,
Breeze
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #43 
But I still think kitchen appliances can be loud-
 
.........
 
I agree with you.  They can be loud.  The question is whether kitchen appliances, or any other sound that is at a volume that can't hurt someone with normal tolerance, can cause damage to the ears of a hyperacusic.  The answer is "no".   

........
 
I would really like to know if you can think of some ways or if you have some ideas that may be helpful for me, that I may be able to use improve my tolerances to sound, especially  for those lower frequencies, that I can work on before the next mowing season.
 
..........
 
Yes.  But it's the same suggestion I made to you earlier.  Breeze, you're putting a lot of commendable effort and energy into this.  Why not direct your energy so that you're using it in the most efficient way possible?  You would do beautifully if you worked with a clinician who can help you with this during the rest of the way.  And you could do it in less time.
 
............
 
As far as the LDL's I understand, and know it could be helpful for me to know what mine are.  But I wonder if just any audiologist would know the proper method and ways to administer that test.
 
..........
 
I can think of three ways for you to get a proper set of LDLs done.  1.) If you have to, get on a plane and get to a clinician who has the knowledge to help you, not just with LDLs but with a plan to get you the rest of the way.  That would be the step I'd recommend.  2.) Contact someone who knows how to administer LDLs and have them walk your clinician through it over the phone prior your appointment.  3.) We could post the technique Jastreboff recommends here for you and you can print it out and share it with your clinician or you could purchase his book and share that information with your clinician.  LDLs are just one step you should be taking, in my opinion.  But you ought to start there so you know what you're dealing with.  The test is simple, very useful, and will not hurt you.   
 
Rob
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #44 
Dear Sandy,

Thank You for your very kind thoughts.

To have you say you think it unnecessary to protect from the
sound of the appliances in the kitchen gives me some more perspective.

And I will assume and hope that as time goes by, if I ever dig them back out,
Like my dishwasher is starting to sound less loud to me,
they will also sound not as loud as the last time I tried to use them.

And if they still sound too loud, or are too much for me
 and I want to use them-
I will consider that there may be quieter ones than what I have -
I was thinking last night that there is a kind of coffee grinder,
that allows hands free operation after it starts up and that may allow me to cover my ears,
or leave the room if necessary.

I know what you mean about some sounds not lasting that long-
sometimes if they are brief, it is not as difficult-
that is how I started to "allow some sounds in" at one time-
just a second or two, of something that was difficult.
Like a plane flying at a bit of a distance
when I was outside-
I would allow the sound "in" for just a little bit- a second or two-
and then cover my ears.
And after awhile I would allow the sound in for a bit longer
I do that with my dishwasher sometimes,
I usually hang out in the other end of the house when it runs,
but sometimes, if my hearing is doing allright that day-
I may do something in a nearby room for a little bit, and then go seek shelter in a back room-
I have spent too much time in a nearby room though, not long back
though if I remember right, my hearing was not doing really good that day either-
and I wound up with my hearing more sensitive afterwards.
But a little bit at a time, is ok for me-
I think it all adds up. Overtime.

Thanks again for your kindness,
And your perspectives,
Peace and Truly Beautiful Day to you
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Dan

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob
The question is whether kitchen appliances, or any other sound that is at a volume that can't hurt someone with normal tolerance, can cause damage to the ears of a hyperacusic.  The answer is "no".


That's what I was talking about earlier. If an appliance generates 90 dB, then anyone nearby (regardless of whether they're a "normal" or have hyperacusis) should protect their hearing. An appliance which generates 70 dB may cause symptoms in some people with hyperacusis, but that sound intensity is not going to damage the middle or inner ear itself.

Note on the attached chart, they're showing a blender to be 90 dB, so that's above the 80 dB limit.

- Dan

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Guflu

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Reply with quote  #46 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan


Note on the attached chart, they're showing a blender to be 90 dB, so that's above the 80 dB limit.

- Dan


It would account for the problem using it causes for a hyperacusis with a low LDL. But I don't think that a blender is harmful for the hearing, unless you would be using it for a couple of hours non stop. It's also a matter of length. Otherwise a lot of housewives or housemen would be having hearing damage, don't you think? Especially if they were using a hair dryer close to the ears daily as well. ;-)

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #47 
Rob,

Thank you as always for your reply
I will keep what you said in mind, about the LDL's
and I appreciate your time and thoughts on that.

I had asked-
I would really like to know if you can think of some ways or if you have some ideas that may be helpful for me, that I may be able to use improve my tolerances to sound, especially  for those lower frequencies, that I can work on before the next mowing season.

and you replied-
Yes.  But it's the same suggestion I made to you earlier.......

I am a bit lost on that one, but wonder, does it have something to do with headphones?

I had said -
But if a Loud severe thunderstorm shows up, I won't promise not to grab my muffs if it is too much for me. (You also should know, I actually enjoy watching the "light show" that a storm can bring, ........)

Just so you know about what I said about the thunderstorms-
I said what I did to let you know I am not really afraid of the thunder-
(Though I will admit as i look back when I first got these hearing challenges, I was scared of the noise of the storms, because they seemed Really Loud)
I used to watch alot more of the "light shows" they provide-
long ago -but to be able to even watch some of it, when it's pretty distant - as of last summer was nice though, it left me amazed to be able to do that too,
As that was another thing, like being able to handle any percussion in music, that I thought at one time, I would probably never be able to do again.

Though most thunder storms won't find me near the windows, they are still loud,
Unless it is afterwards, looking for rainbows :-)
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cbBen

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Reply with quote  #48 
Vacuum and some phone use (doctor's orders on the latter, though it was custom plugs not muffs specifically recommended and I have since lost those).  I haven't had the courage to try the blender again, but when I do it will be with muffs.

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Scott

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Reply with quote  #49 
I use ear plugs for the vacuum and blender.

I live in a quiet place, so don't have the outside noise problems some others do.

I generally let my ears be my guide. When they are very sensitive, I will use plugs for much less than 80 db sounds.

I just try to find a balance, where my ears can have enough sound that they can handle.

Some of the best advice I've learned from this board is to get to know my tolerances and work with that.

I haven't found the 80 db rule to work for me. My ear's sensitivity changes. Trying to follow a rule outside of my own self has gotten me into trouble. Better to focus on knowing myself and what I can handle.


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