The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Note: This topic is locked. No new replies will be accepted.


Reply
  Author   Comment  
JenMcK

Registered:
Posts: 513
Reply with quote  #1 
Because you seems to know so much about hearing sensitivities and things relating to that. 

__________________
~~~~ Jen ~~~~
0
bartony

Registered:
Posts: 836
Reply with quote  #2 
I don't think he is, Jen, but he's the most knowledgeable friend we have.  He's been there, suffered that, wears the tee shirt.  I thank God we have Rob.  He's been one encouraging inspiration to me, kicked my tail when it's needed it.  One great guy.



__________________
Tony


John 3:16-17
0
dpellerin

Registered:
Posts: 778
Reply with quote  #3 
I second that.

He is one special dude.


0
JenMcK

Registered:
Posts: 513
Reply with quote  #4 
I just thought he might be since he knows a lot. 

__________________
~~~~ Jen ~~~~
0
Layla

Registered:
Posts: 443
Reply with quote  #5 

Hi Jen! Glad to see you here!!

Yes, I thought so about Rob too, at first! He sure knows a lot!!

I wanted to tell you about a guy who wrote this book: http://www.triggerpointbook.com/ It's on Amazon too: http://www.amazon.com/Trigger-Point-Therapy

It's mainly about massage of tense 'trigger points' in muscles that trigger pain in back or other bodyparts, headaches even or such, and curing backache etc with this.. A friend recommended it to me cause it helped her a lot with her shoulder/neck problems (not sure, do you get back/neck problems too?) Great book!
Anyway, when I read it, I thought of you!

I was delighted to see there's a part at the end, in Chapter 12, about sensitivity to eating noises and other noises too! the author said his Mom had it too, and he had it.. Then he found - of all things! - a good psychiatrist, Dr Hugh Storrow (who wrote Introduction to Scientific Psychiatry (1967)), and he helped him with this by teaching him relaxation and also did some hypnosis on him. It was very interesting to read!
Apparently he got very tense just by thinking of a restaurant, and then when he relaxed it got really better! (Have you noticed, did/do you tense up when experiencing sensitivity to noise too?)

There are some relaxation techniques described too.. and he briefly addresses nutrition earlier on too (on page31 - he says vitamins B1, B6, B12, vitamin C and folic acid, and minerals calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium are important, one should not exceed maximum limits of folic acid, iron, vitaamin A and vitamin B6 though) - he says they are important with the trigger points, and on page24 he says that muscles with trigger points can press on nerves which can then become hypersensitive.. Fascinating reading..)

If you can get it in your local library, I highly recommend it! It may help you to find a good psychiatrist to help you with this, maybe? You could show it to the psychiatrist or ask if they know Dr Storrow's work or such?
Or maybe the author of the book knows other psychologists/psychiatrists using a similar approach? (might be worth contacting-?) He seems a really nice guy and I enjoyed reading the book, especially the first and last part, where he speaks about himself! (am still reading the part inbetween, about the massage..)

Just saw it's on google books too: if this link doesn't work, google 'dr storrow scientific psychiatry' - this was the 4th link from the top down

Anyway, is your sensitivity any better? (& have you broken the soda addiction?) Hope you're better by now..!!

0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #6 
To say I am grateful that Rob spends time here,
sharing what he has learned is an understatement.
And I think we are fortunate
to have someone around here - who cares so much  as well.

Dp says-

He is one special dude.

I have to say you must be right about that!
0
aQuieterBreeze

Registered:
Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #7 
Rob,

What you wrote the other day, did make a difference to as well as for me.
It's a little hard to describe how i felt.On a few different levels, and I just wanted to
say thanks, and Thanks for all you do!
0
Rob

Registered:
Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #8 

JenMcK --

 

It's important to me that you understand I am neither an audiologist nor a physician.  I am making suggestions and answering questions.  I believe these suggestions are founded on a sound basis in fact and I'm here to help.  I've read most of the available hyperacusis literature and several books on tinnitus treatment that are of interest to me and have helped to shape my views.  I have hyperacusis as well as tinnitus, and I've developed my own effective approach using broadband noise, music, and other sources.  

 

I am very familiar with cognitive behavioral therapy, having studied it in graduate school, and I've read several books on CBT held in high regard by therapists who practice it.  Portions of that approach resonate with my own views on what could be called "talking back to ourselves" about tinnitus.  I am personally drawn to the non-directive approach attributed to Carl Rogers, which I feel has a lot to offer in support settings and is far too often missing on support boards.  I have absolutely no qualifications to do anything other than make the best suggestions I can, answer questions the best way I can, and offer support or an extending hand. 

 

While the approaches I've taken to help ameliorate hyperacusis and tinnitus have worked and continue to work for me, they may or may not work for you.  And nothing -- absolutely nothing -- can replace or substitute for diagnosis by a knowledgeable hearing healthcare professional (e.g., an ENT, audiologist or neurotologist) and working with that healthcare professional to devise a therapeutic program specifically designed for your particular needs.  The suggestions I make on the board regarding hyperacusis or tinnitus treatment are based on one person's experience -- my own -- and you should consider it to be anecdotal evidence.  While I'm pleased if my suggestions have some utility, it is crucially important for you to discuss them (and anyone else's suggestions) with your own hearing healthcare professional.  That individual is most familiar with the particulars of your hearing challenges or other medical challenges. 

 

Nothing you read on the Internet should be taken at face value.  It can be a good start, but you need to do the legwork to determine if it is true and, just as important, if it is right for you.  The best way to do so, I believe, is to educate yourself about your hearing challenges, whether tinnitus, hyperacusis, or something else, learn about the available options, and then work closely with a knowledgeable clinician on the proper and most efficient course of treatment for your needs.

 

Rob        

0
DrJ

Registered:
Posts: 222
Reply with quote  #9 

Really nice post, Rob.  Dr. J


__________________
Marsha Johnson
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No self solicitation of goods or services. 4 No discriminatory remarks based on race, gender, or religion. 5. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.