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Tanya

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Reply with quote  #1 

I am new to this message board. My dad is 67 year old and is suffering from noise sensitivity for the past 2 years. He cannot bear loud noises and cannot talk more than 5 mins on phone as it hearts him badly. We visited multiple doctors and they diagnosed as depression and currently treating for the same. Its been 2 years since he went out to any restaurant or social gathering or any place outside the house. Most of the time he spents his time lying down on bed as the depression medicine makes him drowsy. If he goes for doctor's visit, it takes almost one week to recover.

He cannot bear bright light as it causes pain in his eyes.

From past one year he has balance problem and started physiotherapy. Can you please help me in bringing his life back to normal.

Tanya

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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #2 

Tanya,I am so impressed that you are reaching out to find help for your Dad. There are many things in question about the direct cause of his sound sensitivity. Perhaps a qualified audiologist would better help determine what he has. Could it be from sound exposure,certain meds?,neck injury,TMJ etc. There are many causes for Hyperacusis/sound sensitivity. I hope you find the right help and God bless you on your efforts!    Paul

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Tanya

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you for your reply. Two years back my dad shifted his house and moved to ground floor apartment. His room was very close to the generator for the apartment and also lot of traffic sound can be heard from his window. This might be one of the cause for his condition. Yesterday his physciatric suggested listening to his favourite music from ipod at low volume. Today my dad listened his favourite music for 30min. Hopefully we will see some improvement.
Tanya
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saab1216

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Reply with quote  #4 

I am sorry that I am the only reply here. i would offer some suggestions but am afraid that I will be immediately bombarded with disagreements. I only hope for the best with your Dad. As for me,I have just about beat Hyperacusis and now experience some misophonia.

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Marilyn

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Reply with quote  #5 
Ahhh, I dispute that!  You know I never disagree with you, Paul.  (Just kidding )

Welcome, Tanya.  May I suggest an oto-neurologist for your dad?


__________________
~ Better days are ahead! ~
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Judy

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Reply with quote  #6 

Hi Tanya, I am a 15 year sufferer of hyperacusis and otoalgia (pain in my ears) lucky for me I was seen by a very understanding neurologist years ago, however, I have recently suffered a setback after fire alarms going off and am going to see a otoneurologist as the past medications I was on are no longer working....so perhaps getting your dad to a large university hospital setting would be a good place to start since they see these types of things much more frequently than most internists of family doctors....good luck to you and your dad I know what it is like to live your life in isolation.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Tanya,

You mentioned-

Two years back my dad shifted his house and moved to ground floor apartment. His room was very close to the generator for the apartment and also lot of traffic sound can be heard from his window. This might be one of the cause for his condition


What you mention  makes me  wonder - has he been using hearing protection alot?

I ask because even though it would be very  understandable,  using hearing protection Too much can make one  even  more sensitive to sound.

Also does he still live in that apt.? Near the generator?

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Judy,

Thank you for posting, though I am sorry to hear about your setback.
You mentioned -
have recently suffered a setback after fire alarms going off and am going to see a otoneurologist as the past medications I was on are no longer working

Did you ever do any sound, or desensitization to sound, therapy?
Or were you just prescribed medication?

I hope your setback fades away soon. I've had many of them and find that the beginning is usually the worst, for me,  and that it can be very helpful to be careful of the sound one is around, and take it easy soundwise, during a setback.
It's not the time to push it soundwise, but .take it easier.

Keep in mind that covering our ears with our hands can be helpful in an emergency situation, or other times when needed.  It may not be always be all that is necessary,  but it can still be helpful. Also, getting some distance from sound that is too difficult can be helpful as well,
and so can asking people to speak more quietly, when necessary.

Take care, and I hope you notice some improvement soon.

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Judy

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #9 

I believe that the new otoneurologist is going to try some type of therapy and my neurologist feels he would be a good match for me and my issues with otalgia, hyperacusis and tinnitus......thanks for your post and encouragement. Judy

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Tanya

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Reply with quote  #10 

Hello all,

Thank you for all the responses.

aQuieterBreeze - My dad still lives in the same apartment. He uses cotton all the time to plug his ears.

I am thinking of starting him on listening to pink noise. Can anyone let me know how long he needs to listen every day? Does he needs to increase the duration slowly?


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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Tanya,

I think many people would probably find the sound of a generator running  very close nearby difficult to tolerate,
Maybe it would make your dad feel a little better to know that others may  find sound such as that  difficult as well.....

Someone posted something not long back, about being in an apt. and having a very hard time with the sound of some air conditioning units on the roof - he was on the top floor,
and was planning to move.

Sound such as you mention like the generators, may in addition to being heard as sound -
be able to  be picked up as vibration as well. (Though I have no idea if your dad has mentioned anything about being sensitive to the vibration from it)
As far as the sound of traffic from outdoors - closing windows tightly can help, (verses leaving them open even just a little)  and closing curtains can help a bit as well.  Though it may still seem loud and / or bothersome, to your dad.

Has he considered moving, or changing apartments to hopefully find something a bit quieter - and not so close to the generator? Would that be an option?

You mentioned -
Yesterday his physciatric suggested listening to his favourite music from ipod at low volume. Today my dad listened his favourite music for 30min. Hopefully we will see some improvement.

How did he do with listening to the  ipod the other day?

Also does he use anything for background sound at all? Or does he try to keep things as quiet as possible?

You mentioned he started to have some balance problems about a year ago ....
did anything else change at that time?

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Judy

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #12 

Hi everyone, I saw the otoneurolgist on Monday, he gave me ear numbing med. lidocaine patch and new med for the nerve ear pain, also recommended trying a sound cancelling headphones....has anyone ever tried any of all of these treatments for their Hyperacusis?..Judy

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Judy,

 I'm not in the medical field and have not tried any medication such as  you mention,
 and others  know more about how meds can affect these challenges....
 
In another thread Ben posted the following, though the medication he mentioned, AND that the thread was talking about,  (which were different) may both have been quite different than what you have been  prescribed  - (Though I would have no way of knowing)

Ben said- (about a medication he had taken) -

"You may feel better, more like you did before hyperacusis, but based on my experience I would not advise going to loud places (movies, concerts) just because you may feel much as you did pre-hyperacusis.  Again, based on my experience, you may in fact NOT be the same or near the same, and accordingly be best advised to raise your tolerances systematically before delving back into the world of loud noise.

And of course there is often if not always no substitute for professional medical advice.
"

And If I was going to take medication as needed, to try to alleviate any symptoms of these challenges - I would  want to be aware of the levels of sound around me, and in the environments i was in (to make sure they were OK) - and proceed cautiously especially around loud sound, to make sure i was alright in the environment, and allright later. 

i have wondered if someone with hyperacusis amd/or tinnitus
and going out to a pub and having a few drinks - may  not notice if sound they are around gets louder, (even if it was OK for them to begin with) and becomes  too  difficult later,
as alcohol can dull the senses .....
And though medication is different -

I have wondered (though i have no idea ) if some meds may have a similar effect, (by buffering the symptoms, and/or dulling perceptions of sound ) and leaving one more unaware of the levels of sound around them? While on the medication....
And I wonder if some may not notice that the sound they are around is too Loud?
Though I don't know, I only know that when i am around sound that is too loud For Me
I do know that,
and if i don't protect my hearing/ears in appropriate ways at that time -
(which among other things may  include leaving an environment that is too loud)
my hearing/ears will become even more sensitive for awhile.

So I wonder if it may be a good idea,  that even if it seems you are able to tolerate louder/loud environments with the medication,  to take it somewhat easy soudnwise and see how you really do --- and what environments and levels of sound are really allright - For You?  (especially since it seems you are still recovering from a setback)

 I think with these challenges to be aware of the sound levels around us -
 especially when it comes to loud sound can be important, as we keep working on improving our tolerances to sound.

We are all different though and those are just my views ....
as I don't know what would be right for you
I do hope you get some relief from the medication, and notice some improvement soon....

Take care, take it easy, and get better

That other thread I mentioned can be found here-
http://www.chat-hyperacusis.net/post?id=4266574


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Judy

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #14 

Hello and thank you for your response to my question..regarding medications I quess only time will tell if they are working....can anyone tell me anything about noise cancelling headphones? Thanks again and take care to all who suffer. Judy

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi Judy,

I've heard there  are some medications that are very important to taper off of slowly, if one does take them, and then decides to stop taking them - especially after being on them for awhile, but  others know alot more about medications  than I do.
(And I have no idea if what you are taking would fall into that category either.)

About the noise canceling headphones, did your doctor tell you what situations to use them in? Or make any suggestions of how to use them?
(Some noise canceling headphones can also be used to listen to music - or other sound as well. )

Also did he/she mention  anything about using sound enrichment?
Something to have playing or "on" n the background while you are at home,
something gentle to have on low volume  - that you find easily tolerable and pleasing (soundwise) for sound enrichment/ background sound? Not over the headphones - but something from an external source, such as a table top sound machine or a perhaps a very gentle nature CD....did your doctor mention if something like that may be helpful? 
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Judy

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #16 

hello to quieterbreeze....no he just mentioned to try some type of noise cancelling headphones as I am using ear plugs and my visit to his office was very loud and distracting as ambulances kept going by and I would need to stop our conversation and put in my ear plugs..I see the audiologist in a couple of weeks for LDL testing and then I'm sure some type of recommendation will be made by her..thank you for your response...and take care to all that suffer. Judy

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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #17 
Hi Judy,

I don't know how effective the noise canceling headphones would be against the type of sound you mention, others would know more about it.
Active noise canceling headphones, from what i understand are fairly effective to help with constant, or continual sound (in the ranges that they do block out)
I don't know how effective they would be with sirens though, that's a good question for those who are in that type of environment, where sirens are a problem though.
Maybe Debbie would know?

Bose makes some good noise cancellation headphones though they are not inexpensive, and some have said they notice  some pressure on their ears when using them,  others really like them, for using when necessary.  The ones that go around the ear instead of sitting on them - would seem to me to have better noise canceling abilities, and also be more comfortable. Though the pressure on the ears that some have mentioned, I believe has more to do with the way the noise is canceled than with the style of the headphones.)

Another thought (for loud environments, though i am not sure if they would provide as good protection from the sound of sirens as "regular" earplugs ) may be  some musician's earplugs, as I have read that they work a little differently than regular earplugs,  and seemingly lower the volume - across all frequencies,
making it seem more like someone has turned  the volume down,
compared to regular earplugs which may seem to really muffle the sound.
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