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Lisa_Davies

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Reply with quote  #1 
There were 3 very important pieces of advice I would like to give that helped me overcome my hyperacusis - 1) Relax your jawline - this is the strongest muscle in the body and tensing it narrows the tubes to you ears and can cause hyperacusis 2) Use of sound therapy to de-sensitise and 3) Do not stay in quiet or silence - this will make your ears more sensitive - always be exposed to some sort of sound during your waking hours.

I'm sharing my experience with you in the hope that it can help those of you suffering with hyperacusis. I am a very vigilant person and had already suffered from hissing tinnitus and 20-30% hearing loss for a few years and then started suffering from hyperacusis after travelling by car one day a few years ago. I experienced an imbalance in my hearing between my left and right ears, together with muffling, very loud tinnitus and sharp, intense, continuous pain. Looking back now I remember that prior to this I thought the coating must have come off my crockery or cutlery because it seemed that everyone in the family was scraping their plates and this was 'going through' me. I had also began to put cotton wool in my ears for exercise classes because the music seemed to be very loud and I was concerned, as a tinnitus sufferer, that my ears would be further damaged. The pain became worse over the coming weeks and became so bad that I paid to see a ears, nose & throat consultant in Harley Street. He thought it was stress related and said the best thing I could do was to try to ignore it. He also advised me to see a hearing therapist but, living 250 miles from London, it was months before I was offered an NHS hearing therapist appointment and about 12 months before I could get to see an NHS ENT specialist. Months passed, the pain got so bad that I couldn't stand the sound of most things, even a switch being turned on - I also found myself changing my own speech to avoid hurting my ears. It is very difficult for others to understand and no one makes allowances for you. It was more bearable outdoors because the sound could carry and, generally the bigger the room, the less pain I experienced. The NHS consultant told me it was caused by narrowing of the tubes and only advised me to chew regularly to open them up for relief.

The best advice & support I got was from a sympathetic NHS hearing therapist who explained the condition and recommended sound therapy. She also advised me that my ears were not damaged but that it was the way my brain interpreted the sound. At the time there was no way I could believe that my ears weren't damaged and that I was actually causing the pain myself - this was unthinkable, it just didn't make sense and I could not see a way of improving - it seemed like a lost cause and that I had permanent damage. I had to endured the pain and stress, did my best to carry on but also tried to expose myself to sound. Having a telephone based job, wearing head phones and struggling to hear with office background noise did not help and my employer, at the time, seemed to think I was making it up to get a transfer to a non phone based job! 

I found low base tones therapeutic as it was high pitched sounds that I found the most difficult to cope with - for example sitting next to a volume printer or oscillating fan at work (after changing my employer) really helped. A GP also advised me to download sound therapy apps to my mobile - I use 'Relax Therapies' app whose basic sounds are free - you could even place your phone under your pillow at night and play sounds.

I can still feel hyperacusis triggering from time to time but using the above measures helps keep it at bay. My very best wishes to you all, please believe that this horrible condition can definitely be overcome with the right approach & methods. Good Luck [smile] 
 



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Lisa Davies
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ybbest

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks for sharing your success story.
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DanMalcore

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Dan
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Reply with quote  #3 
Very good advice.  Thanks for sharing...

[wave]Dan

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YellowFlowers

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Reply with quote  #4 
I'd say staying in silence isn't an issue for everyone, depending on your severity, staying in a silent room might give your ears a well-needed rest. And if you have pain-hyperacusis then your ears or hearing are probably damaged... Otherwise, the pain-receptor like nerve cells wouldn't react. 
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by YellowFlowers
I'd say staying in silence isn't an issue for everyone, depending on your severity, staying in a silent room might give your ears a well-needed rest. And if you have pain-hyperacusis then your ears or hearing are probably damaged... Otherwise, the pain-receptor like nerve cells wouldn't react. 


Sound therapy decreases hyperacusis pain for me.  Your results may vary.

The brain can trigger pain as well as the body.
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BA

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Reply with quote  #6 
thanks for sharing

i think it just confirms each to their own.

What is important is that we keep abreast of things others do to see if 'that' could benefit me.

if not, no loss.  Not knowing is worse.

Please, everyone keep sharing.

BA
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