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iasthai

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Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #1 
got h 13 months ago. it got really bad 3 months ago.
i've noticed my ears thump when people talk to me or when i'm listening to an audiobook. this has been going on for a couple of weeks. anyone know anything about this?
also i have been using pink noise for the past three months but it is not helping the h. i do have sound generators that i used to wear; however, now after wearing them for a couple of hours they increase my various t sounds.
i'm trying to find a way to actively increase my sound tolerance without increasing the t. but i'm not sure how. i have been staying calm and accepting the noises and for the most part trying not to become annoyed, angered, or worried. theres got to be a way...
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #2 

Can you use sound enrichment?  It has to be a pleasant sound you have no dislike for (i.e. can listen to it 24/7). That's something you could work toward.

In my experience my tinnitus often does get worse as I push my boundaries and try to move forward. But, in the long term, as my tolerances increased my tinnitus became much less and has even disapeared for long periods. 

Could be the ear devices are too much for you right now, but I can't say. Can you tolerate the car alright? Maybe gradually take longer car trips, I know that's helped me increase my tolerances. I'd suggest just keep listening more to sounds that you can tolerate. That's what I've done to make progress for years. 

I would have a very hard time moving forward if I was focused on controlling the level of my tinnitus. The key is just to take things slowly, and not focus on your tinnitus.

There's also the spanish protocol David posted, which he says has been very helpful in increasing his tolerances. 

http://www.chat-hyperacusis.net/post?id=4724819

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iasthai

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Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #3 
i always used to go on car trips in the fall. they were great i could barely hear the tinnitus and the hyperacusis wasn't a problem at all. however i went on a long car trip 3 months ago and after that my hyperacusis really increased and my tinnitus got really loud and a whole bunch on new noises emerged. ever since then the t and h have kept going up. the t even reacts with external sounds which is why i just play pink noise 24/7 since it reacts the least with pink noise. i've adapted to it and can live with it but i would like to recover. feelin very positive though and i'm up for the challenge. i'll get back to you on more of this but i got to go for now. thanks for helping me out. its nice to talk to someone who has experience with this and doesn't think i'm off my rocker.
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Johnloudb

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Posts: 1,951
Reply with quote  #4 

Do you still drive your car? Are short drives a problem for you?

Everyone with hyper has ups and downs, and symptoms get worse sometimes. But the real problem, as I'm sure you know, is the sensitivity. Ears need practice with lots of sounds and desensitization to sound needs to be done very slowly for the most part. 

There's also Rob's music protocol, in a thread around here somewhere. I couldn't find it, but maybe someone can point you to that thread.

I'd also recommend reading all the information on this site and Doctor Hazell's site (  http://www.tinnitus.org  ).

 

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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi J,

You mentioned -

 i went on a long car trip 3 months ago and after that my hyperacusis really increased and my tinnitus got really loud and a whole bunch on new noises emerged. ever since then the t and h have kept going up.

Can you think of anything that happened on your trip, other than the driving - that would have caused that?

and you said -

.....i have been using pink noise for the past three months but it is not helping the h.

What are you using for pink noise?

and also -

i'm trying to find a way to actively increase my sound tolerance without increasing the t. but i'm not sure how.

Have you tried talking to the clinician you got your wearable sound  generators from?

Though I am not in the medical field and am not sure what you are experiencing, or why -
sometimes people with these challenges  may get what is known as a setback.....
(where being around sound that is too loud to tolerate, can make being around other sound more difficult for awhile)
where sound that had been tolerable, or had become tolerable -  becomes more difficult again ...
sometimes a lot more difficult, and sometimes setbacks can last for awhile.

With ones I have had,  even with really difficult ones, the beginning part is usually the most difficult for me. After awhile my setback starts to fade, and sound becomes  a bit more tolerable again....
Sometimes mine can take a long time to fade away.....but as they do things get a bit easier and sound is not quite as difficult anymore.

Thankfully  as i keep working on improving my tolerances to sound, in ways I have found to be helpful  for me,   the setbacks i get are fewer and further between ... and it takes more in the way of sound to cause them. And with ones i have had, i've not only been able to recover - but also go on to further improvement after they have passed.

When i get a setback part of what happens is  my t spikes as well.....
and my t (which fluctuates in reaction to sound anyway) fluctuates more in accordance with or in reaction to other sound at that time...sometimes my tinnitus  has gotten so loud - i wondered if it would ever settle back down, but it has - at times surprising me when i finally notice that it is much quieter again, and sometimes my t has seemed very quiet when I finally  notice that..

When my hearing gets more sensitive to sound, such as during a setback - 
i find it can help to take it easier around sound, as being around sound that is too difficult  for my hearing/ears  to tolerate at that time, can make my hearing/ears even more sensitive.  (and when my hearing and ears get more sensitive everything sounds even louder, not just my tinnitus)

You mentioned-

 the t even reacts with external sounds which is why i just play pink noise 24/7 since it reacts the least with pink noise

  Does it seem to be soothing and easy on your ears otherwise?

and you also mentioned-
 
 .i have been using pink noise for the past three months but it is not helping the h.
 
Finding something that is tolerable, gentle and soothing on one's ears and that can easily be tuned out,  to be able to use for background sound / sound enrichment can be very helpful. Though we are all different in what we are able to tolerate.

We are all different, but when  my hearing /ears get a lot more sensitive, from being around, or exposed to sound  that is too difficult for me to tolerate -  - I will usually put on the most gentle track on a nature cd i have,
 as it is generally soothing and tolerable to my hearing/ears - even when they are more sensitive than they usually are ) and if I am able to to tolerate it - i will let play over and over at a low volume level (a volume level that  is very comfortable for my hearing/ears the time ) and at other settings that are very comfortable and tolerable for me at that time as well, as for me it seems to be soothing on my ears  and seems to be helpful.
But we are all different, and I can't t say what would be right for others.

Though finding something we are easily able to tolerate that is soothing to our hearing/ears is something I think can be helpful, in at least a few ways when dealing with these challenges..
And John is right, sound enrichment, that we ARE easily able to tolerate -  can be very helpful in general.....
(and many with tinnitus find that using something tolerable and pleasing for background sound / sound enrichment can help take their minds off their tinnitus)

About the audio books -
There may be settings you can access on the device you are using (for listening to the audio books)  that May make the sound more tolerable  for your ears .....
Though i imagine it would depend what you are listening to them on.
And perhaps the quality of what you are listening to ....
as some file types may have or retain better sound quality than others ...
and some people with these challenges are more sensitive to certain frequencies and vocal ranges,
so the vocal characteristics of the person the book is being read by can make a difference too....Some voices may be easier to tolerate than others.

Someone may have mentioned some settings for audio books, on a computer awhile back.
If i remember right - someone had found them difficult to tolerate and found changing a setting was helpful.

Though I am not sure why you are experiencing what you mention,
many around here are doing much better than they were at one time .....

Wishing you much better days,
aQB

P.S. I just noticed John's post -
there is some information on the site John posted the link for, that can be downloaded -
see the links on the left side of their main page for their "download" page,
As  they have some very interesting articles and papers available in that section,
and there are also excerpts from a book on TRT available for downloading, and that link can also be found in the left column, of the main page.
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