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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Rob

I've completed week five of the first protocol you kindly wrote for me and feel really comfortable.  So now I've started today with moving onto your original protocol using earbuds.  I have just two CDs now by the same musician, John Michael Talbot, that I can tolerate and am happy to stick with those for now.

However, I read in your protocol that  CDs, Tapes are better that MP3.  But I only have an Ipod for listening 'on the hoof', rather than just sitting or lying down listening in my room through the only CD player we have.  What I did today was go for a walk and listen to one of these gentle CDs on the lowest setting on my Ipod (still loudish in my opinion but can't go any lower - I've checked on the net and other 'normal hearing' people are saying the same).  Felt relaxed and happy listening to the whole CD this way.   Is this OK bearing in mind that it is MP3 recording off a CD?

I'm afraid that any of my other CDs (e.g. Faure, Nanci Griffiths, Arlo Guthrie etc) will be way too loud for me on the Ipod even on the lowest setting so is it OK to stick with just this really gentle music for now or am I being a wimp?

TV and radio are still bothersome and for some reason I don't seem to be making any progress at all with volume tolerance there.  Still very very low and using subtitles.  Wish I could progress as I have done with the music.

Look forward to hearing your views - I am so grateful to you for getting me this far with my confidence alone...

Thanks!

Kenda
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #2 
kenda,
 
I'm proud of you.  I was wondering how you were doing with the first protocol.  You're doing great. 
 
For this next part, I think we should work on your delivery system a bit.  Trust me on this.  Until you get this sorted out, I strongly suggest that you stick with the first part of the protocol.  It shouldn't take very long to get what you need so you can get going with the regular music protocol. 
 
If your current setup is "loudish" to you (and your opinion about this is the only opinion that counts), then it is not the setup for you.  I suggest getting a portable CD player by Sony or a similar company.  Just a basic portable CD player, so you can be mobile if you want to be. 
 
I also suggest you get some headphones to listen through, rather than earbuds.  There are some good earbuds, but they tend to be more expensive.  The typical earbuds do not deliver very good sound, in my view.  I started using the Bose Quiet Comfort 2 noise cancellation headphones when I walk on a treadmill that is a little noisy.  The headphones are great at reducing noise and they are good at reproducing music.  That's one option.  Really, any headphone you're comfortable with will be just fine. 
 
The sound of the music must be pleasing to you and you have to be able to have a delivery system where you can set the volume so low, if you need to, that you have to strain to hear the music.  In other words, it's important for you to have the option to be able to set the volume very, very low.  You may or may not use it (and once you get going, you won't have to), but it will be nice to know it's there.  So, "loudish" is out because the chances are you will be shy about increasing the volume very much, which is an essential part of the protocol.  But if you have a system that allows you some latitude in terms of volume, it will really be helpful.  The main thing is we don't want you starting off with music that is already a little loud.   
 
The next thing to remember is very important.  Another advantage to setting the volume very low if you need to is it will enable you to listen to anything you like.  It's very important to listen to as many styles as you can.  The 2 CDs you play are fine, but it's time to start using others too.  Don't try to do so with your iPod and earbuds because it's too loud.  But with the delivery system I'm recommending it won't be a problem for you and it will be helpful to you.  So, what we're saying is to try Faure or Coldplay or anyone in between.  Play it as low as you need to.  The important thing is to play it and to mix it up.  One CD per day.  When the CDs over, you're done for the day. 

It would be better if you used CDs, not mp3 files.  There is more digital information on a CD and a wider bandwidth of sound.  That's why CDs or .wav files sound better than .mp3 files. 
 
You are not being a wimp to be concerned about hearing music you feel is too loud for you.  The nice thing about the protocol is that you are in complete control at all times.  You should never force yourself to listen to anything that seems too loud.  In order to do that, of course, you need the right equipment.  Again, we're not talking the best equipment.  Just a very simple system that sounds pleasing to you and is comfortable to wear/use.

I believe you will make progress with TV and radio once you get a month or two of the protocol behind you.  Don't be frustrated about that.  Keep in mind the most important thing:  You're making progress and you're building your confidence.  Remember that not long ago you were convinced you couldn't listen to anything through headphones.  I'm glad I can help facilitate that a bit for you, but you're the one doing the actual work here.  I say if they can teach a dog to shake hands, we ought to be able to teach a person to shake hands with herself.  Give it a try.  In fact, try to shake hands with yourself and mumble at the same time.  If it makes you laugh, then you're doing it right.   
 
If any of the above is unclear, ask questions.  Once you get a more suitable delivery system for the protocol, you will be ready to go.  CD player (like a Sony Walkman) and comfortable headphones that emit a pleasing sound.  Use CDs, not .mp3 files.  Don't use external speakers.  Place the sound right in your ears.  This will help with phonophobia, misophonia and hyperacusis. 

Rob
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nanosecond

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Reply with quote  #3 
Bang & Olufsen makes a decent set of headphones as well.  Come with the Neuromonics device.  I've been using them with my iPod and iPhone (Yes!  I admit it, I am an addict and I can't refrain from using the evil sources of my H & T.)

I am wondering however if the Bose headphones are earbuds or external earphones?  The B&O are rather large and I occasionally get sore spots on my ears from using them a lot.

I have a set of Digitor external earphones but they were cheapies and I'm not sure if they would do much for frequencies.  I'm a novice ... hence was entrapped by the standard iPod earphones!

Rob - how do the Bose thingies go with T?  The whole "noise cancelling" thing is a bit dubious to me as earphones cause my tinnitus to ring so loud it is unbearable ... hence I haven't ran out and bought a set.  Yet.  Not sure what is worse - ear blisters or ringing tinnitus.
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #4 
Dear Rob

Thank you SOOOO much for the advice and the detail of it!  My Dad gave me a Sony CD walkman and I tried it but it had volume settings 1,2,3,4,5 and is quite old; the lowest setting was even louder than the Ipod (!Eeek!) so I shall have to buy new.

So: I know this is a big ask, but are you able to recommend a particular model because I can't go into big electrical stores to choose one due to the number of people and Christmas music blaring away.  I have to make purchases on the internet (we live right out in the sticks anyway!) but if you, or someone else on the forum, knows of a CD walkman type thing that meets your specifications: "In other words, it's important for you to have the option to be able to set the volume very, very low" I'd be very glad to know.
 
I'll look into the headphones (I only have earbuds - JVC HA-FX33BE Marshmallow Earphones, Black [Electronics]) which are very comfortable but clearly I need to buy headphones.  The Bose are really expensive here in the UK but I guess it's an investment for the future too (however, I dented a friend's car this week so am probably going to be a bit strapped for cash....)!

I am chuffed to bits that you are pleased with me.  I'm pleased too to have got this far but agree 100% that I need to listen to other music than just playing safe with this folksy music I've got on just 2 CDs.  My audiologist is really pleased with me to - I have you to thank for her praise.

Thank you in advance for any advice you can give on particular make/model of portable CD player I can take on walks with me. 

Rob, I think you are wonderful!

LOL

Kenda

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #5 
kenda,

Here's the portable CD player I'm using now, the Sony D-NE319 ATRAC/MP3 CD Walkman.   

This model will get the job done and give you plenty of volume control.  (I put mine in a belt I wear around my waist, that has a little pouch to store the Walkman, so I can go anywhere I like with it.) 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sony-D-NE319-ATRAC-MP3-Walkman/dp/B0007UB520/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1229551621&sr=1-7

The Bose QC2 headphones are expensive, but you're paying for a quality noise cancellation headphone as well as a delivery system for listening to music.  For folks with hyperacusis, it can be very helpful on airplanes because it really reduces low-frequency noise emitted by the engines.  But that's just one option.  Any decent-sounding headphone that is comfortable to wear and sounds good to you will do just fine.  Sennheiser puts out some nice stuff, and there are many other brands that will do just fine.  We're not looking for perfect here, just good.  If it sounds good to you, then you've found the right headphone.   

Hope this helps.  Once you get the equipment together, you will be ready for the big time.     

Rob

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #6 
Nanosecond,

The reason you're more aware of tinnitus when you wear noise cancellation headphones is because you hear less external sound when you wear them.  Because there is less sound to compete with the tinnitus, you are much more aware of the tinnitus. 
 
Rob 
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #7 
Dear Rob

Thank you for the advice.  I've looked at the amazon link - don't understand some of the blurb but if you recommend it, that's good enough for me.  Amazon also mentions 3 others but I'm not sure how they would differ from the one your recommend.  I wondered about the one that had 40 good reviews - what do you reckon?  It seems to be a similar price but I really don't understand the technical stuff about these things - I just want a really low volume and decent sound:

24% buy
Sony D-NF340 MP3 Personal CD Player Black 3.0 out of 5 stars (2)
£42.23
Sony D-NE511 Silver ATRAC/MP3 CD Walkman
21% buy
Sony D-NE511 Silver ATRAC/MP3 CD Walkman 4.3 out of 5 stars (40)
£43.48
Sony D-NE900S Silver ATRAC/MP3 CD Walkman
17% buy
Sony D-NE900S Silver ATRAC/MP3 CD Walkman

 
The Bose headphones are more than I can afford at present, but I saw these:
Sennheiser PXC 450 - NoiseGard Active Noise Canceling Headphones
With good reviews and wondered if they would do the trick?  I can just about stretch to these.
 
Hope I'm not being a pain asking all these questions Rob but I want to do it right and do it well - you've given me so much confidence so far and I want to keep the momentum going.  My CBT lady is pleased with me.  My husband just pointed out to me that perhaps I should check with DB when I see him next month, whether this 'phase 2' music protocol (using headphones rather than external speakers) fits in with my wearing external white noise generators.  I hadn't thought that through and wonder if I should wait until I see him to check it fits in with his treatment plan....
 
CBT: suggested tv protocol is now to watch same prog (I'm proposing using DVD of Monty Don's "Around the world in 80 gardens") at the same time each afternoon to get baseline and then work from there.  Sound OK to you?
 
Many thanks
 
Kenda

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Kenda.
 
The Walkman with 40 good reviews may be perfectly fine, but I can't vouch for its volume control because I've never used the device. 
 
The advantage of the one I recommended is that I know it real well and that can be a big advantage if you have any questions.  The volume goes low and the sound is perfectly fine.  As I say, the Walkman with the good reviews is probably just fine, but since I've heard (and use) the one I suggested to you, there won't be a bit of guesswork involved. 
 
The Sennheiser headphones you found are a very good choice.  Go for it. 
 
It hasn't entered my mind that you're being "a pain".  Let's go to the video tape.  Not very long ago, you were convinced you couldn't listen to music at all.  A few months later, here you are making good progress and doing everything you need to do to make more progress.  Not only are your questions not annoying, they are responsible.  It comes across loud and clear that you're doing everything you need to do to re-establish your tolerance.  Who wouldn't want to be part of that?  The truth is, I'm very excited for you and I think the best is ahead of you.  
 
My suggestion is that you order the delivery system and get started using it.  You would do the phase 2 music protocol when you're not wearing the generators, and it would complement or supplement using the generators in that it would be another way that you expose your ears to sound.  By all means, discuss these things with your clinician.  Keep in mind that the protocol does two things: It helps with hyperacusis and it really helps with phonophobia or misophonia that has developed due to decreased tolerance.  
 
Thumbs up on the TV protocol you mentioned.  Go for all of it. 
 
I'm looking forward to hearing how it's going for you.  I'm more convinced than ever the best is ahead of you.  
 
Rob   
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #9 

Dear Rob

Thank you so much.  You kind words warm my heart and always give me more hope than I awaken with (it's morning here!) - today I seem to have awoken in tears feeling lonely and scared.  Perhaps it's because of Christmas and I'm comparing this year with last year when I had so many plans for 2008, our tenth wedding anniversary year - perhaps a return to the USA where we met, plans to get my voice trained after putting it off for 13 years, plans to start visiting elderly folk in their homes on a regular basis and go back to prison visiting again....   Sorry, I've gone "off message" here...! 

Anyway, I think I'll spoil myself for Christmas and go for it - buy the player you suggested, because, as you wisely say, you know it well....

Thank you again so much (and sorry for the emotional blip there!) I'm looking forward to widening my listening to more of my other music.  The CD stack is leaning over with dust and lonely!

:-) (trying to be Oh so optimistic...)

Kenda



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Rob

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Reply with quote  #10 
kenda --
 
Sometimes when we look at the whole picture, and think about where we've been and how much there is to do before we get where we're going, it can seem overwhelming.  What I like to do at those times is to just look at the next thing I'm going to do.  Practically anyone can do the next thing, if we try.  I think it's great you're asking these questions, which are very pertinent, and that you're doing the next thing.  I believe by next year at this time, you will be able to do a number of things you may have thought you would never do again.  If it's true that a dream deferred is twice as sweet, you're in for a high old time.  For now, just show up consistently each day and do the next thing. 
 
A little hint about the music protocol:  Even after you've set your levels for listening that day, if you're ever in doubt and feel the music is uncomfortable in some way or too loud, lower it by one step.  As you will soon learn for yourself, the music protocol is a process.  If you put the volume on so that you have to strain to hear the music the first week, that's perfectly fine.  If you feel a little tentative the first few weeks, no problem.  The key is to listen to an entire CD each day using headphones which emit a pleasing sound and to be perfectly comfortable when doing so.  The first week I listened, I set the CD player you're about to get on the lowest volume.  As you're going to see, that is really low.  But that was the level at which I was comfortable -- at least initially.  Little by little, the threshold for what is comfortable will change.  
 
Rob         
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Guflu

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Reply with quote  #11 
Dear Kenda,

I know you don't know me, but I read your stories once in a while, and I am very proud of you that you started to do the music protocol. You should treat yourself to that device!

I can relate to your feelings, since I also had many plans for 2008. One of them was getting officialy married. But that would have been very difficult on the planned date 080808, because of the hearing problems. Ah, but that's what the holiday season does to you, doesn't it? Let's focus on the here and now, and maybe the future, instead of the past.

And Rob, thank you for being the angel you are, spotting keys and helping people to challenge themselves in constructive ways. I hope for you in the coming year more dreams will come true for you.

Have a wonderful holiday season!

John

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It's the sparkle you become when you conquer anxiety. [Bjork-Crystalline]
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #12 
Gufu,

I have wanted to reply to something you said in another thread, and this looks like a good place to do that-

you said-
I have found that nuances are coming back to music as well. When I just came down with H and T, 98% of the music I used to
listen to suddenly sounded awful, all out of balance, distorted, weird. My whole world fell apart. I could NOT imagine
that to ever get back to normal again. But it is possible. I can listen to music again.  Not very loud yet, but on a soft
level. And most of the time it doesn't sound weird anymore.


I should point out when I notice all those beautiful nuances  is usually when I really "actively listen" to the music.
And it is much different for me than having it on for background,
and to me, it is a wonderful way to listen.
I am glad that you are able to enjoy music again- I know what you mean about some of it not sounding right at first,
and I still have that happen with some things sounding different to me or not as good, as I remember. But in general I can tolerate alot of the instuments again,
where as at one time I really thought I would never be able to tolerate percussion again.And more selections and artists as well sound better to me again all the time.
It is truely beautiful.

Rob,

It has been about a year, almost to the day, since I sat down, and listened to that first album- after not listening to music for years,
Thank you, for the beautiful flash of insight and inspiriation, that led me to do that!
(It came from reading about your Music Protocol)

And as you can guess, I have been following this thread, and still need to get some headphones of my own.
And I think I am beginning to see/hear part of why having the sound closer to my ears may help.
(I can tolerate sounds at a bit of a distance, better than if they are closer or in a  direct line/path to my ears. Left one in particular, And my guess is that having a
very controlled source of sound closer, may help my ears and hearing get more acclimated to that more direct sound)

Kenda,

I am also in the market for a portable cd player, and all I can find locally by Sony are 3 models-
so thanks for your discussion about that, as it has me looking to see what else is available.

With wishes for a beautiful holiday season to all of you, and everyone here,
aQuieterBreeze
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks one and all!

QB raises a question my husband asked me earlier today.  He asked me why the 2nd phase protocol (I know, I'm calling it that!) required headphones.  He asked "Why can't you just carry on listening to the music as you are doing, through external speakers?".

I'm guessing that QB has hit the nail on the head when she writes: "having a
very controlled source of sound closer, may help my ears and hearing get more acclimated to that more direct sound".

 
I think my hubby is perhaps concerned about me spending so much on yet more equipment (I've spent a lot of my own money over the last 11 months on all sorts of stuff including under pillow speakers, radios I don't use, natural noise CDs and private therapies of various kinds), but I am pretty convinced in my own mind that this is a good step forward to becoming a lot less phobic about sound in general.

I really like your comment Rob when you say if: it's true that a dream deferred is twice as sweet, you're in for a high old time.  For now, just show up consistently each day and do the next thing. 
 
You sound like an organised upbeat sort of guy.  I am pretty messy and chaotic even when I'm well, so these sorts of protocols are a good discipline for someone like me.  It's tricky and hard work, but doable!

Thank you again for giving me so very much hope - both for the future but also for the present.  I've perhaps been looking with longing, too far ahead.  OK, a holiday abroad with my husband is a future goal that I long for, but it is the next small step that will get me there that I need to focus on tomorrow and then the next day...

:-))  no more tears....

Kenda
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #14 
He asked "Why can't you just carry on listening to the music as you are doing, through external speakers?"
 
........
 
The Breeze gets it.  With the sound close up to your ears, Kenda, it will help you with your fear of sound that has developed alongside of and in reaction to hyperacusis.  This is a way to take back the reins.  If you've developed a fear of sound, then stick the sound right next to your ears.  In effect, you're going to be walking straight up to what you've become afraid of.  But because you're going to do it in a very controlled way, where you are always in complete control and comfortable at all times, you're going to turn the tables on your fear and show it who is in charge.  Not only that, but you're going to start to enjoy yourself again. 

.......
 
I think my hubby is perhaps concerned about me spending so much on yet more equipment.
 
........
 
When you're able to take that holiday abroad with him, your husband can spend even more money on you.  So, he has a lot to look forward to.   
 
........
 
I am pretty convinced in my own mind that this is a good step forward to becoming a lot less phobic about sound in general.

.........
 
Exactly.  About a month, maybe a month and a half into it, you will know you're on the right track.  You've already done the hardest part.  You've gotten off the fence, and you sound very determined to see this through.  The rest requires consistency, educating yourself a bit about this stuff, and working with a knowledgeable clinician who can see you through.  Just show up each day and do what needs to get done.  I'm sticking with my prediction.  In a year, you are going to surprise yourself with what you can do.  This prediction comes straight from Shecky Central, so you know I mean business.  Keep up the great work.
 
Rob 
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #15 
Rob,

Kenda is actually the one who gets the credit for her thinking that using headphones may be helpful in the way that you mention.-

With the sound close up to your ears, Kenda, it will help you with your fear of sound that has developed alongside of and in reaction to hyperacusis.  This is a way to take back
the reins.  If you've developed a fear of sound, then stick the sound right next to your ears.  In effect, you're going to be walking straight up to what you've become afraid of.  But
because you're going to do it in a very controlled way, where you are always in complete control and comfortable at all times, you're going to turn the tables on your fear
and show it who is in charge.  Not only that, but you're going to start to enjoy yourself again.

Good going Kenda!

And though I  really appreciate your thoughts and explanations to Kenda about that,
my original thoughts were that it may be helpful in other ways, though I don't know for sure-
but wonder what you think?
When I mentioned what I did, I had something else in mind-
(Would having that very controlled source of sound closer to the ears, perhaps be a little different and/or work a little differently on the auditory system, than having it further away?)
That was what I was thinking about- that it may work a little differently in helping my ears/hearing get more acclimated to those more "direct" sounds.

So I wonder, what do you think?
Does having a very controlled source of sound closer to the ears also help in other ways, and/or work in a slightly different way on the auditory system as well?
Verses listening over external speakers?
Other than being helpful in the way you and Kenda mention?
By the way, I am not phobic about trying some nice headphones, I just don't have them yet-
And at this point, I look foreward to the experience, of  listening to some music over some very nice ones :-)

Kenda,

I hope some of the answers in this thread will help convince your husband, that the price of the headphones, is a small price to pay if it is something that may help you,
and also something that may bring you happiness as well.
These challenges can be difficult and finding happiness where we can, is worth searching for.
Especially when it can sometimes be found, in something as beautiful as music. Because I have found listening to music,
not only makes me happy, but has helped make it so the rest of the world does not sound quiet so loud to me anymore either.

Wishing you much happiness,
aQuieterBreeze
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #16 
Rob,

I went back and re read some of this thread, and realize in the last lines of your first post in this thread, you mention some things- (when talking about the music protocol to Kenda)
and now I realize that is a large part of what led me to some of the thoughts I had. (And Like I said- you are good at making me think!)

It sort of "clicked" the other day, and I thought about it, when I was near someone who happened to open a can of soda,, in a fairly direct line with my hearing.
It sounded pretty loud and "sharp" - So it got me thinking, and wondering -
(I can tolerate sounds at a bit of a distance, better than if they are closer or in a  direct line/path to my ears. Left one in particular, And my guess is that having a very controlled source of sound closer,
may help my ears and hearing get more acclimated to that more direct sound)

And about the questions I  asked, in the previous post? I think you may have already answered at least one of them. Thanks!

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Rob

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Reply with quote  #17 
Breeze,
 
The purpose of having the sound right next to one's ears, as opposed to using external speakers, is to literally walk straight up to one's fear and take back the reins.  In my view, while it would work on the auditory system with regard to decreased tolerance of sound, it would primarily work on the limbic system and the autonomic nervous system in terms of any associated fear or dislike of sound that has developed in conjunction with or separate from decreased sound tolerance. 
 
Rob 
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aQuieterBreeze

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Reply with quote  #18 
Rob,

You mentioned-
The purpose of having the sound right next to one's ears, as opposed to using external speakers, is to literally walk straight up to one's fear and take back the reins.  In my view, while it would work on the auditory system with regard to decreased tolerance of sound ..........

And I wonder, do you think having the sound closer to one's ears, would work any differently on the auditory system, than listening over external speakers?

Thanks for your thoughts,
Breeze
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #19 
Dear Rob and Breeze

Well - I've bitten the bullet and ordered the Sennheiser PXC 450 - NoiseGard Active Noise Canceling Headphones along with a carry case.

My husband found a Hitachi Dap761 portable digital CD player with an added volume wheel on the cord (sorry I'm such a non-tecky person!) which makes the sound go really really low.  So I'm hoping that will suffice, along with the super-duper new headphones when they arrive?  I don't want to lose momentum and have been feeling so very downhearted by how my ears react to the tv.  My sound tolerances there seem to be lowering not improving but I'm going to take the DVDs I mentioned to my parents' home over Christmas and try doing the tv protocol there in an ordered fashion!

Thank you both so much for your input.  I'm printing off some of the encouraging words you said just to remind myself that I'm not a freak of nature and that I can get better - slowly, slowly catchy monkey..?!

LOL

Kenda x

P.S.  I've just finished a pencil drawing for my Dad's 80th - the first proper piece of artwork I've done in 12 months - hurray!  It's another step forward.  I just wish I could show you it because I'm really chuffed with how it's come out.  Can't post images here I guess?

 
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kendaleigh

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Reply with quote  #20 
Eeek - looking at how long ago it was I last posted on this subject, and owing to a few setbacks at Christmas and more recently at work, I went back to the original protocol using external speakers.  My CBT lady thought it a good idea and not so much a step back, but a slower step forward.

Anyway, I'm writing here to say that this evening, even after half a day in an office environment, I bit the bullet and listened to a Clannad CD with the Sennheiser PXC 450 - NoiseGard Active Noise Canceling Headphones and my Dad's Hitachi Dap761 portable digital CD player with volume wheel - whole CD right the way through!  OK, admittedly it was very low volume but I still feel a sense of achievement and if you'd seen the state I was in yesterday afternoon (BIG, BIG dip in confidence and hope, lots of salt water shed on the ground) it's even better!

Rob - you said sometime ago on this thread:
"I'm sticking with my prediction.  In a year, you are going to surprise yourself with what you can do. "
 
I'm taking you at your word today.  On 6th March, it will be a year since I first went down with Hyperacusis and in many ways feel I've made precious little progress - mainly because voices still hurt my right ear sometimes, so do passing tractors, printers, shredders etc.  To be honest, without you spurring me on, I doubt I'd have made it this far without been dragged off to a padded cell somewhere in deepest darkest Middle England...

I'm going to give Arlo Guthrie a try, perhaps tomorrow...

Best wishes

Kenda
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Rob

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Reply with quote  #21 
Music to my ears. 

As far as listening at a low volume, that's exactly where you need to be when you start the protocol.  Over time, that will change.  It doesn't matter where we start.  It matters where we end up.

Great work.

Rob     

 
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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #22 
Dear Rob,

Have you written a book of quotable inspiring sayings, for those of us with these challenges?

I really like the way you phrase some of what you say-

Quote:
it doesn't matter where we start.  It matters where we end up.


Dear Kenda,

Please let us know how it goes with Arlo.

I have not tried listening to any Arlo,
but can listen to many other things and more of it all the time. Some of it can really please and surprise me as well. (that I am able to listen to it)
And some of it sounds so Very, very nice :-)
And I think some of it may sound even better through headphones,
and though I have not tried headphones yet, and they are still on my shopping list.
I am very happy for you, and encouraged by your progress.
And in my view, all steps foreword are great.

Peace and Very Happy listening to You!
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