This message board is available to anyone whose life has been adversely affected by sound (i.e. hyperacusis, tinnitus, recruitment, sound sensitivity, etc.)
The Hyperacusis Network Message Board
Register New Posts
 
 
 


Note: This topic is locked. No new replies will be accepted.


Reply
 
Author Comment
 
telliott

Registered: 09/30/11
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 

I am new to this message board.  I strongly suspect that my 8 year old daughter has misophonia.  From the reading I have done it looks like there is no clear treatment option.  Some mention cognitive behaviour therapy, some talk about sound exposure but that seems more to apply to hyperacusis, not specifically to misophonia.  Does anyone know where to begin when looking for treatment for a child?  I live in SW Ontario Canada.  Any ideas would be appreciated.  She is currently getting some counselling/cognitive behaviour therapy and we have had some success with noise blocking earphones.

bergpws

Registered: 09/19/11
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #2 
I am very happy to hear you are trying to help her. I have had this since childhood and everyone told me I needed to get over the sounds or just ignore them. People would say to me "they arent that loud I can barely hear them" I wanted to scream! I still do. It is so misunderstood. Its hard to expain how a tiny tiny sound can make someone burst into tears or get so angry. Its so real.
Your a good mum!
Chris
deafleg

Registered: 08/22/11
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #3 
There is a Tinnitis and Hyperacusis clinic in Ontario. Probably your best bet.
But children usually don't suffer from misophonia for no reason. They are too busy trying to have fun. Maybe she has or had Hyperacusis previously and it resulted in her misophonia. Still take her to the doctors. Its also possible she has some sort of ear pain but can explain it to you? Neuro- otologist followed by taking her to the Hyperacusis clinic in Ontario should be a good start.

She will get better though, based on my reading and research, children grow out of hyperacusis as their body develops and reach full maturity. 

Best of Luck

DL
Gizmookie

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/24/08
Posts: 342
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deafleg
But children usually don't suffer from misophonia for no reason. They are too busy trying to have fun. Maybe she has or had Hyperacusis previously and it resulted in her misophonia.


I respectfully disagree.  Many children have misophonia for no reason.  I was one of them.  I don't have hyperacusis.  I've never had any sort of trauma to my ears or trauma in life.  I just suddenly one day hated the sound of my dad eating.  

Suddenly. 

Without reason. 

From the hundreds of people who have misophonia that I talk to, this is how it happened to them to.   Yes, some have hyperacusis, and the misophonia is a result of that.  But you don't have to have one to have the other.  You can have misophonia alone. 


Telliott, 

Can you explain why you think your daughter has misophonia?  Does she dislike certain sounds or is there physical pain involved (or both)?  I have misophonia also and mine began when I was about 12.  Eating sounds, dogs licking paws, birds squawking, sniffing, etc... are the sounds that get to me.  My reaction is anger, rage, anxiety... but there is no actual physical pain to my ears.  I only have misophonia. She is so lucky to have you to realize that she needs help.  I didn't get help until 2 years ago... 24 years later.  I think your daughter will have a much improved life getting help so young, especially with your support. 

There is no known 'cure' for misophonia.  However, there are things that can be done to help cope with it a little more.   CBT is one of them.  I have had success with CBT.  It hasn't fixed the problem, but I am able to live my life a little more normally.  Another thing that helps is using good sound to combat bad sound.  Are there sounds she really loves?  For example, in my home I have a lot of background noise... fish aquariums, fans, pleasant music or nature sounds, etc...  This helps keep my concentration on the good, when I hear the bad.  I also had a large amount of anxiety with my misophonia and did go on some anti-anxiety meds for a while which helped.  However, your daughter is so young, I would try everything else before that. 

There has been a lot of press lately concerning misophonia with articles in the NY Times, interviews on The Today Show and various radio shows.   Hopefully this will bring this issue to the attention of more doctors and someday research will be conducted as to the cause of this condition.   In the meantime, you are a great parent for doing what you can for your daughter.   Just having you there for her will make a big difference.  

Darlene


telliott

Registered: 09/30/11
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks so much to everyone for your replies and encouragement.  I have contacted the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Centre in Ontario - haven't heard back yet. 

To answer Darlene:  She started reacting very strongly to chewing/eating noises at meal time about 3 or 4 months ago.  It started with just her father but has generalized to her sister and I as well.  She has such a strong reaction - anger, tantrums.  At first I thought it was behaviour but quickly realized it was something else.  We tried loud music in the background, letting her wear her MP3 player, letting her leave the table to calm down.  Since I found out the misophonia is a real 'thing' we've started letting her eat in the other room and/or wear noise reducing headphones.  She is very distressed by all of this.  I don't think it actually hurts - she hasn't expressed that.  Just that it really bothers her.  

I like the idea of having other pleasant noises in the background.  Will try that. 

Tanya
Gizmookie

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/24/08
Posts: 342
Reply with quote  #6 
Tanya,

wow, she sounds just like me when I was young.  I applaud you for noticing that this is not just a tantrum.  I remember when I was little and this first started.  It was extremely confusing not only to get angry over a simple sound that nobody else seemed to notice, but to be angry at someone I loved and respected... my dad.   The difference between me and your daughter is that she has support, whereas I did not.  The other difference is that growing up, I thought I was just weird or crazy.  I didn't know that this was a real problem that others also suffer with.  She can find comfort in knowing that this is not her fault, and there are others like her.  Keep us posted if you are able to find help at the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis center in Ontario.   Best of luck to you and your daughter.

Darlene

PJ007

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 10/02/10
Posts: 191
Reply with quote  #7 

 

  Telliot

   Maybe I can help my 8 year old was diagnosed with hyperacusis about a year ago.   Can you tell me more about your child's symptoms?  

   PJ

AudiologistJohnson

Registered: 07/05/11
Posts: 156
Reply with quote  #8 
Misophonia is significantly different than hyperacusis.  The vast majority of these cases where onset is in childhood, as you have described, do not show any signs of hyperacusis.

Dr J
PJ007

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 10/02/10
Posts: 191
Reply with quote  #9 
Telliot-

Does your child have trouble with specific sounds?   like people eating?  (misophonia- hatred of sound)

Does your child have trouble with tags on clothes, touching cotton balls, lights, cameras flashing, Halloween costumes?   

Has your child been seen by a Developmental and Behavorial Pediatrician? In our situation we took our son to see a team to rule out other causes before we knew he had hyperacusis.

Or does your child have trouble with trains, motors, vibrating toys as a toddler, planes, babies crying, or people laughing? (hyperacusis)

Where was your child diagnosed?

Kids are more difficult to diagnose than adults....at least that's been our experience.

I hope I can help.   Other parents have helped me in the past.

Sincerely,
PJ
telliott

Registered: 09/30/11
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #10 

She hasn't been diagnosed - based on the reading I have done, I strongly suspect that she has misophonia (not hyperacusis).  She is reacting very strongly to specific sounds (mostly chewing).  The audiologist at the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Clinic in Ontario told me that she didn't work with children.  If anyone has ideas about other audiologists in Ont. that might see her or any other suitable resources, I would be very appreciative.  I have emailed Dr. Jastreboff but no reply yet.  My family Dr. has never heard of this, nor has the counselor that my daughter is seeing.  Not sure who to approach next.  Thanks again for all the replies.

PJ007

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 10/02/10
Posts: 191
Reply with quote  #11 

 

  Dear TElliott-

 

  I was looking to see what would be the top hospital in Canada and I believe it is Toronto.   I found this link to Ear, Nose and Throat etc.   This group could rule out physical reasons for noise sensitivity.  After they rule out physical reasons within the ear and also an audiologist could be helpful after that.  If you can find a research audiologist they may be able to stretch to treating children even if they normally don't.

http://www.otolaryngology.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspx

 

 We thought my son had Superior Canal Dehiscience Syndrome but Johns Hopkins ruled it out.  Then we went to The Ear Institute of Chicago to rule out other surgical reasons.   Finally we went to University of Iowa for our son's treatment.   Iowa could have done all of the steps but our path took us to Johns Hopkins first.     

 

My son is afraid of noise because of his hyperacusis but with sound therapy the fear is leaving as his tolerance goes up.   He use to act out about noise and looked like he hated noises when he was younger.   We also took our son to a Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrician to rule out chromosome type reasons for his behavior early on.  A correct diagnosis is so important for a child.   It took us five years to get the answer for our son. 

 

Feeding therapy may help after a diagnosis is made to help him with eating noises.  

 

From my experience, I believe kids need more tests to figure this stuff out since they can only tell us so much about what they are experiencing.   Adults on this site can articulate specifically what part of sound is difficult for them or if they are afraid of sounds etc.   Children can a little but I have found that a parent's observations and medical tests are key to diagnosis.

 

I hope this helps.

 

PJ

         

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

This message board is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for any medical advice. MANDATORY BOARD ETIQUETTE: 1. No personal attacks. 2. No profanity or use of inappropriate usernames. 3. No advertisements. 4. Prohibitive postings include the following: discussing or suggesting the intent to end one's life, moderating or actions made by the moderators, and/or revealing personal information (full names, address, phone number). Rule infraction may result in either a warning or ban, depending on the severity. Kindness matters.
Powered by Website Toolbox - Create a Website Forum Hosting, Guestbook Hosting, or Website Chat Room for your website.