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SkaMasta097

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Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,

I have trouble talking on my cell phone, especially for extended periods. Often times, it makes my ears ring louder and causes a setback, and that's with the volume all the way down to the lowest possible level. Some people just have loud voices, high pitched voices, or are in noisy areas when they call. I ask them to move to a quiet(er) environment, and I hold the phone away from my ear when it gets too loud, and I can often still hear them. I have used my decibel reader to measure the volume of the receiver, and it fluctuated between 70-96 dB, on the lowest setting. I don't know how accurate that is in relation to what the ear actually hears, since the microphone was right up the receiver and my ears are usually not. If 96 dB is accurate, no wonder so many H sufferers have a difficulty with phone conversations. With other people's phones, I turn them all the way down if I have to use it, and sometimes even then, I can hear clearly with the phone a foot away from my ear.

Does anyone else have this problem, or do they just make phones loud these days? I am not going to even get started on those loud, tinny mp3 ringtones people have in public that you can hear from 20 feet away.

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Johnloudb

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Reply with quote  #2 

You've got a really loud phone it sounds like. Better get one that can be turned down lower. Or stick a muff on the phone.

John

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Rob

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Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #3 
The volume isn't 96dB; nevertheless, the sound of cellphones is processed sound and can sometimes be problematic for folks with hyperacusis.  Try a piece of duct tape across the receiver.  It will dull some of the higher-ended frequencies a bit.  You can press the tape down a bit to make the sound less loud. 

Rob 


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Marilyn

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Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #4 
That's a good idea, Rob.  I'll try it when I call my insurance company where I'm put on hold about 10 minutes with loud music playing.  I usually muffle the phone with a pillow during that time or give the phone to my son to babysit.

Skamasta, I put my phone on speaker and that helps a lot.  Six months ago telephone talking was a misery to me, but as my LDL's have improved I'm doing much better.

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SkaMasta097

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Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #5 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob
The volume isn't 96dB; nevertheless, the sound of cellphones is processed sound and can sometimes be problematic for folks with hyperacusis.  Try a piece of duct tape across the receiver.  It will dull some of the higher-ended frequencies a bit.  You can press the tape down a bit to make the sound less loud. 

Rob 

Yes, if it really isn't that loud, the sound is definitely processed and tinny. It's the worst with people with loud or high pitched voices (women and children), noisy areas, and I tell people never to call me from a place with loud music or noise.

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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Sakmasta,

Do you use only a cell phone, or do you also have a "land line"?
If you do have another phone to use,
it may be helpful to ask if you can call the person back later, or request that they call you back.

Even conversations on a good quality land line phone can be difficult for some with these challenges.
And there have been times that my hearing/ears have been really sensitive,
(such as during a setback)
And at those times I find limiting the length of phone conversations can be helpful,
if necessary , when possible.
As being on the phone at that time can make my hearing/ears even more sensitive.
(and there have been times my hearing and ears have been so sensitive i have not even wanted to talk onthe phone at all, as it was too hard on my ears ) -
and at those times I would just tell whoever had called, that   I would call them back later.
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saab1216

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Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #7 
Its funny how -I stumbled onto this now. I was just talking with my wife over the phone and opted for the speaker-phone instead. Phone issues have always been a problem for me ,even before my ear issues came about. I did finally lower the volume setting and it is perfect. I think people tend to speak loudly over the phone by habit.
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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Paul,

Knowing you  have difficulty with the higher pitch sounds -
and some have had difficulty even with speaker phones,
can you please  tell us what you are using for a speakerphone?  Maybe it has better sound quality than what some other people may have tried?
Also how low are you able to set the volume?
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catlady2323

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Posts: 208
Reply with quote  #9 
This is an interesting thread.

I have the luxury of using a landline for all my phone calls, and routinely hold the phone away from my head when put on hold (when exactly did annoying music become the standard for those on hold, not to mention listening to endless advertisements to go to their website?).

I also have the luxury of limiting the phone calls I take on any given day.  I allow myself "phone free" time everyday, and just turn the ringer off and let the answering machine take the calls, till I am ready to return them.  I can hear the calls as they come in, (on low volume) so of course can pick up if it is a true emergency.  I feel no need to be instantly available all the time, and have found that for me, this works to prevent meltdowns from too much noise. 

 

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