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CCNH

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Reply with quote  #1 
I had surgery earlier this year in both ears to reduce  noise vibrations.  I would like  to report that I am doing well and have been able to do most of  the activities I did prior to having  hyperacusis  without being uncomfortable.  I have taken several airplane rides, and diners with large groups.  Prior to that it would result in my blood pressure going sky high and my heart rate increasing to a point where I had to go to the emergency room. I had been spending more and more time in seclusion and it was affecting both my life and my husband's life.  Things have changed and my lifestyle is so much better. This surgery has been approved by the Sarasota Memorial  Hospital.  I would be happy to answer any questions.
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CAROL CHREST
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Aplomado

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Reply with quote  #2 

Hello,

Does it reduce the hearing any?

Thanks.

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CCNH

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Reply with quote  #3 
No.  My hearing is the same.
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CAROL CHREST
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briann

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Carol,

Thanks for sharing your experience. I'm curious about what exactly this procedure does. It sounded like it reduces hyperacusis by reducing volume (noise vibrations). But you don't notice any change in hearing sensitivity. Did you have your hearing and LDLs tested before and after to confirm hearing stayed the same while LDLs improved? If hearing is the same, do you have an idea of why the hyperacusis improved?

-Brian
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CCNH

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Reply with quote  #5 
I had numerous tests pre and post op first to evaluate if I needed this operation.  They gave me both hearing and sensitivity tests prior to and after the operation.  I was also given balance and inner ear testing.  The operation is called round window closure and stapedial tendon transection.  I am not a medical type but it is my understanding that the tissue was placed behind my ear drum so as not to interfere with hearing.  I am 75 yrs old so I have some hearing loss but it doesn't interfere with daily living and I do not have a hearing aid and I do not feel it has gotten worse since my operations.  The procedure is like having an internal ear plug without it affecting hearing but better.  I had used ear plugs prior to surgery but still had major problems.
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CAROL CHREST
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Reply with quote  #6 
Very interesting.  What caused your hypearcusis?

I think most of have hyperacusis due to noise exposure, and I am not sure if this would be helpful for all of us.

I am very glad it works for you!
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CCNH

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Reply with quote  #7 
I am not really sure what caused my hyperacusis.  I had major tinnitus before hyperacusis.  Initially, noise would only increase my tinnitus and  I later started to get signs of hyperacusis.  I spent a lot of time and many years with a family member who was severely hard of hearing and kept the television at the highest level possible and had a telephone booster that was enough to wake the dead and when talking with her you had to practically yell.  This probably had something to do with it. 
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CAROL CHREST
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olms

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Reply with quote  #8 
CCNH:

This seems like a very valuable piece of information, your operation to make hyperacusis less sensitive to noise.

I think I had a similar procedure done in an ear doctor's office 30 years ago. And it worked, for a short time. But your operation lasts forever, it seems. Really interesting.

My procedure was, the ear doctor placed a piece of (cigarette-type) paper on my ear drum, both ears, to make them less sensitive to sound. This sounds similar to your operation of,

"I had surgery earlier this year in both ears to reduce noise vibrations.  I would like to report that I am doing well and have been able to do most of  the activities I did prior to having  hyperacusis  without being uncomfortable.  I have taken several airplane rides, and diners with large groups."

"I had been spending more and more time in seclusion and it was affecting both my life and my husband's life.  Things have changed and my lifestyle is so much better."

You said, "This surgery has been approved by the Sarasota Memorial  Hospital.  I would be happy to answer any questions." I assume Sarasota is Sarasota, Florida, USA.

You further wrote on this thread:

"The operation is called round window closure and stapedial tendon transection.  I am not a medical type but it is my understanding that the tissue was placed behind my ear drum so as not to interfere with hearing. 

"I am 75 yrs old so I have some hearing loss but it doesn't interfere with daily living and I do not have a hearing aid and I do not feel it has gotten worse since my operations.  The procedure is like having an internal ear plug without it affecting hearing but better."

One of the parts that interested me about that was, where you said,

"
my understanding (is) that the tissue was placed behind my ear drum so as not to interfere with hearing."

I believe that's the same procedure my ear doctor used on me over 30 years ago. Again, he placed a piece of (cigarette-like) paper on each ear drum, probably to slow down the vibration, which you said was to "reduce noise vibrations." You said they did this by "the tissue was placed behind my ear drum."

It's the same thing I had. Only I had paper placed on top of my ear drum, which would, of course, reduce vibration, which you said was what your surgery was about.

The benefits of my office procedure was for about a week, I'll guess. Your benefits are forever.

I think people should be interested in this. In a way, it doesn't seem like the most complicated thing in the world. I've had a similar procedure but on the exterior side of the eardrum, and I can tell you it works.

Thanks for sharing that, Carol. Are you still taking questions?

                 Tom

 





 
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CCNH

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Tom,

Interesting that you had this type of surgery so many years ago.  Since the doctor put my own skin
rather than something like cigarette paper behind my ear drum I am hoping to have lasting results.
I would be happy to answer any question you or anyone may have.

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CAROL CHREST
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Paulbe

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Reply with quote  #10 
Carol, are you able to specify what kind of symptoms you had that made such surgery a viable option for you?  I find it hard to get information about this kind of treatment option and at times it almost seems like the dirty- little-secret of T & H that no-one wants to talk about.

I'm in Australia.  I haven't found anyone yet who even does this here, let alone someone who will properly assesses you as a potential candidate for it.
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olms

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Reply with quote  #11 
Carol:

You're in Sarasota, Fla., USA, right, and were treated at a hospital there, Sarasota Memorial Hospital?

You said, "The operation is called round window closure and stapedial tendon transection.  I am not a medical type but it is my understanding that the tissue was placed behind my ear drum so as not to interfere with hearing."

Wonder who else around the country, and in other countries, might perform this procedure?

Wonder if the name of the operation, "round window closure and stapedial tendon transection," was typed into the search engine, would it list any names of other doctors who might perform this.

                       Tom

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     I just looked it up on the search engine and so far have found two such procedures, one from Sarasota, Fla, and the 2nd from the United Kingdom.
Part of the first one said:

"Round and oval window reinforcement is a minimally invasive option for treating hyperacusis when usual medical therapies fail."

It's "minimally invasive," meaning it's not that difficult. I've had cigarette type paper placed on the outside of my ear drum, in the ear doctor's office, to reduce the vibration on the ear drum, and lessen noise being heard by the ear, and it worked. Only for about a week or two, but it worked.

So I know the theory is right. And it's not complicated. Carol's operation was to place her skin tissue on the inside of her ear drum, which should last for many years, so this is much better than what I had. This is as close to "the answer" to hyperacusis as I've ever seen.   

                  Tom

Portions of this first article (from the American Journal of Otolaryngology) said:

    
Ear Research Foundation, 1901 Floyd Street, Sarasota, FL USA

To present the outcomes of two patients (three ears) with hyperacusis treated with round and oval window reinforcement.

Results

Two patients (three ears) underwent surgery. Results from the hyperacusis questionnaire improved by 21 and 13 points, respectively. Except for a mild loss in the high frequencies, no change in hearing was noted post-operatively. Both patients reported no negative effects from surgery, marked improvement in ability to tolerate noise, and would recommend the procedure to others. There were no complications.

Conclusions

Round and oval window reinforcement is a minimally invasive option for treating hyperacusis when usual medical therapies fail. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure in reducing noise intolerance.

 
American Journal of Otolaryngology

_______________________________________________


2nd such article (this one from "Journal of Laryngology & Otologyis") and from the United Kingdom is below):

Its key paragraph to me is:

(Conclusion: Blocking of the round window can be used to control symptoms of superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome in patients who present solely with symptoms of conductive hyperacusis. This technique provides an alternative to resurfacing techniques. The procedure is simple to perform, reversible and can be undertaken as day-case surgery.)

  It says: "The procedure is simple to perform, reversible and can be undertaken as day-case surgery."

    More of this 2nd article is below:

The Journal of Laryngology & Otology

A Nikkar-Esfahania1, D Whelana1 and A Banerjeea1 c1

a1 Department of Otolaryngology, James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK

Abstract

Background: Conductive hyperacusis in superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome occurs due to the presence of a ‘third window’ created by the dehiscence. Reversible blocking of the round window can, in theory, cause a reduction in the compression-related volume displacement, and thereby minimise symptoms of conductive hyperacusis. This study describes a technique of permeatal blocking of the round window.

Method: The tympanomeatal flap is elevated and the round window niche is identified. The round window membrane is subsequently identified and occluded with bone wax, muscle and fascia, in three separate layers. Finally, the tympanomeatal flap is reflected, and an ear wick is inserted.

Results: Two patients who underwent the procedure reported a reduction in symptoms. Importantly, no Tullio phenomenon was reported post-operation.

Conclusion: Blocking of the round window can be used to control symptoms of superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome in patients who present solely with symptoms of conductive hyperacusis. This technique provides an alternative to resurfacing techniques. The procedure is simple to perform, reversible and can be undertaken as day-case surgery.

(Accepted September 17 2012)

(Online publication June 04 2013)

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