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mresseguie

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello, all.

I just joined and thought I ought to say hello. Like many of you, I have tinnitus and, unfortunately, hyperacusis. My tinnitus isn't so bad that it drives me crazy, but I'm just 58, so it's got another 30(?) years to get worse. I'll adapt.

My hyperacusis hit me beginning about 2.5 years ago. I was in a small, enclosed space where music was being played very loudly. I was exposed very briefly - perhaps just 2 minutes(?). However, it was enough to cause damage.

It wasn't too bad for the first year or so. I was careful to avoid overly loud amplified music and I kept my distance at outdoor concerts. I carried earplugs for those 'too loud' situations. 

Then, about 18 months ago, my wife and I were at a friend's dinner party. One of the other guests and I were having a conversation when he blasted me with his LOUD laughter from just 2 feet away. I felt it immediately. It was as if someone had hit me with a 2X4. I knew right away that he had damaged my hearing. From that day on, I was very sensitive. I used earplugs practically everywhere I went. Walk into a store - pop 'em in. Doorbell rings...pop 'em in before opening the door. I snore really loudly, so I pop 'em in as I lay down to sleep. 

No matter how careful I was; no matter how good the earplugs were; no matter how creative I got with avoiding loud noises, my hyperacusis kept getting worse. My sensitivity kept increasing. I began having "bad ear" days. They usually followed a dinner party, or really loud people blasting their voices near me. I'd have two bad ear days where I just wanted to hide and not talk to anyone. By the third day, I was okay. I could deal with life again.

Not surprisingly, this was all very difficult for my wife. She didn't understand what was happening to me. Initially, she thought it might be all in my head. [Well, it IS all in my head, but you know what I mean.] Over time, she has learned to accept that it is real, and she tries to avoid clanking plates and speaking too loudly too closely to me ears. I'm very fortunate to have this person as my friend in life. [personals_heart]

Fortunately for me, I got creative with my Goggle searches and stumbled on the Hyperacusis Network in July of this year. I was pretty desperate for a cure, so I gladly paid the $$ and bought a thumb drive with pink noise. I have listened to pink noise for anywhere from 30 minutes to three hours nearly every day since it arrived in the mail. This has made a huge difference in my life! Yeah. I still suffer setbacks, and there are still some bad ear days, but I can go out in the world now without shoving earplugs into my ears every time I see/hear children screaming, women shrilly laughing, and sirens blaring.

Pink noise has given me a much needed second chance to be nearly 'normal'. I'm still healing, and I have high hopes that I will continue to improve. Being able to read posts from fellow sufferers sure helps. It's nice to know I'm not the only one.

Thanks for reading my introduction.

Michael
0
KFOregon

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Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #2 
Hey Michael,
So glad you have had some relief from Tinnitis. I can relate to the good vs bad ear days.
Were you saying that your Hyperacusis is relieved from pink noise therapy too? That's great. I use an app and earbuds to do T&H therapy while Im working, but not much relief yet after a couple months.
Just curious, did your doctors put you through the barage of tests and specialists to get you into noise therapy? Have they pinpointed where the problem is? Reason is, that some of us have different parts damaged but similar symptoms and like I said, curious. Btw, we're about the same age.
I've been a sufferer for about 13 months now, and have only been in this group a few months now, but welcome!
K
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Rob

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #3 

mresseguie -

You use the word “damage” a couple times in your post in terms of hyperacusis and your hearing.  I would try to reframe it in terms of injury not damage – unless exposure to your friend’s laughter caused actual hearing loss, which is unlikely.  This distinction can be a hard corner to turn because what you, and many of us, have experienced feels like damage

As you know, there are steps you can take to address the sensitivity to sound you experience, and that includes weaning yourself off earplugs.  Wearing them as much as you do will make you more, not less, sensitive to sound.  Never wear hearing protection when you sleep.  Instead, purchase a sound machine and put some gentle, soft, neutral sound in the room when you sleep.  Folks with hyperacusis should avoid sleeping in silence. Don’t wear hearing protection at home.  Don’t wear earplugs when you go out, unless you are in a loud environment.  If a dinner party is too loud for you, use hearing protection when you need to for now. 

I am glad to hear the Network’s pink noise is helpful to you.  To get the most out of it, slowly increase the time you use it to eight hours a day.  30 minutes to 3 hours is a good start, but extending the amount of time you use it each day will help you to reestablish your sound tolerance.


****

KFOregon -

To answer a few of your questions, I was diagnosed with hyperacusis and a problem with my tensor tympani.  Several tests were administered to me, including an ecog, but the most important test was a frequency-specific loudness discomfort level test – which showed that my sound tolerance was very low.  A CT scan was not administered to me and a vemp test was ruled out because it is too loud for most hyperacusics.  As for any lessons that may be associated with your experience, that may be much clearer down the road as you continue to make progress. 

Rob           

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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #4 
"Hey Michael, 
So glad you have had some relief from Tinnitis. I can relate to the good vs bad ear days. 
Were you saying that your Hyperacusis is relieved from pink noise therapy too? That's great. I use an app and earbuds to do T&H therapy while Im working, but not much relief yet after a couple months.
Just curious, did your doctors put you through the barage of tests and specialists to get you into noise therapy? Have they pinpointed where the problem is? Reason is, that some of us have different parts damaged but similar symptoms and like I said, curious. Btw, we're about the same age.
I've been a sufferer for about 13 months now, and have only been in this group a few months now, but welcome!
K"

Hello, K.

I see we're in the same State. I'm in Beaver Country even though I don't follow them.

Pink noise has given me relief. It's given me a lot of relief. It's allowed me to turn the corner from being scared of every loud noise and wondering how long I could suffer the misery before going stark raving mad.

I saw an ENT this year who checked my sensitivity to sounds from 20+ Hz up to 8kHz. He did not recommend I try pink noise therapy. He didn't recommend any therapy. $856 and I learned just a little. $60(?) for pink noise, and I'm on the road to recovery.

Once I found out about pink noise therapy, and read some posts by sufferers like myself who benefitted from both pink noise therapy and an attitude adjustment, I was able to adjust my own attitude. Knowing that there is light at the end of the (*&^%$#@!) hyperacusis tunnel had a huge influence on my outlook.

Michael
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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #5 
"

    

mresseguie -

You use the word “damage” a couple times in your post in terms of hyperacusis and your hearing.  I would try to reframe it in terms of injury not damage – unless exposure to your friend’s laughter caused actual hearing loss, which is unlikely.  This distinction can be a hard corner to turn because what you, and many of us, have experienced feels like damage

I understand how damage is different from injury. I will make an effort to change my way of thinking and try to think and type 'injury'. Thank you.

As you know, there are steps you can take to address the sensitivity to sound you experience, and that includes weaning yourself off earplugs.  Wearing them as much as you do will make you more, not less, sensitive to sound.  Never wear hearing protection when you sleep.  Instead, purchase a sound machine and put some gentle, soft, neutral sound in the room when you sleep.  Folks with hyperacusis should avoid sleeping in silence. Don’t wear hearing protection at home.  Don’t wear earplugs when you go out, unless you are in a loud environment.  If a dinner party is too loud for you, use hearing protection when you need to for now. 

I do understand that wearing earplugs slows or prevents healing. However, there are times where I simply cannot bear the screams, squeals, claps, percussive blasts attacking my brain. I absolutely will use earplugs in those instances. I control the degree to which the earplugs block sounds. I know to not block these offensive sounds completely, but to diminish their impact on me. Cutting a few dB form children's squeals of laughter can't be too terribly detrimental in my humble opinion. You are welcome to disagree, but it's my comfort level we're discussing.

Further, most people who snore are merely annoying. A few years ago, I went to a sleep clinic because I was concerned I suffered sleep apnea. It turns out I didn't qualify for a CPAP machine because there was no evidence of APNEA. I was surprised. My wife was shocked. The clinicians did note that I was one of the loudest snorers they had encountered in nearly ten years of testing. My snoring is LOUD. I do wear earplugs when I sleep. If I do not do so, I will awake the next morning with a headache and/or horrible discomfort in my ears. Again, you are welcome to discourage me from wearing earplugs while I sleep, but I know what happens if I do not.


I am glad to hear the Network’s pink noise is helpful to you.  To get the most out of it, slowly increase the time you use it to eight hours a day.  30 minutes to 3 hours is a good start, but extending the amount of time you use it each day will help you to reestablish your sound tolerance.

Eight hours per day is going to be a challenge. I use it whenever practical. If I can find earbuds to sleep with, I will happily listen to pink noise while I sleep.       

Thank you for your input. I do appreciate it. I will continue to increase my pink noise time, and I will use my earplugs less often than I used to.

mresseguie


0
KFOregon

Registered:
Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #6 
Hey Rob, the red letters make me feel like Ive been scolded by the principal.
Correction(s); I said damage once.
Mine was not noise induced, but over pressure from a PAs irrigation syringe.
Also, Mine required further testing to pinpoint the area affected, and deemed vestibular in nature.
So, if you want to correct me then lets hear your credentials. And if you know more than my neurotologist and otolaryngologist, then I want a refund, and the address of your clinic.

I just tried to relate to the guy honestly and encourage.
If I need to worry about how I frame things here
Im out
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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #7 
Um. This is Michael (mresseguie). 

I used the red text to respond to Rob's post because I wanted my response to be clear as it was intermixed with Rob's text.

I could just as easily have used blue or green text. Unfortunately, I chose to use red text. I apologize for anyone's confusion.

Peace out.
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EDogg

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Posts: 163
Reply with quote  #8 
Hey Keith,

I think there was a misunderstanding here. I believe Rob mistakenly addressed his message for mresseguie to you (based on the context). And I believe mresseguie replied to Robs reply by quoting Rob and responding in red type. I don’t think anyone is scolding anyone else! We are all here to help each other through this.

Hope this clarifies.

EDogg
0
EDogg

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Posts: 163
Reply with quote  #9 
Hey Michael,

Welcome - from another Beaver stater. You’ve come to the right place and you’ve gotten some great advice. Hope for continued success in desensitization with the pink noise!

Best,
EDogg
0
Rob

Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #10 
KFOregon -

I meant to address only the last paragraph of my previous post to you, to answer some questions you asked me in a PM you sent me. 

The rest of my post was written to mresseguie, but inadvertently addressed to you.  I have edited my post to correct my error. 

I did not write the red text.  mresseguie wrote in red to respond to me. 

Rob 





































































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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #11 
Well, I tried to change my first line in post #3 three times already, but nothing has changed. If I had typed "Rob" instead of the original KFOregon, I suspect this misunderstanding could have been avoided. Lesson learned.

I sent KF an email which (hopefully) explained my intention. I hope he returns.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I'd like to chat a bit more about my situation.

My doorbell rang just a couple minutes ago. As I went to open the door, I automatically popped earplugs into my ears. We humans have this unsettling habit of speaking very loudly to show our sincerity and friendliness. Sure enough, the two women at the door blasted their presentation for the entire neighborhood to hear. I was protected.

I have two pairs of earplugs that I always keep on hand. The heavy duty pair are foam plugs that are capable of reducing sounds by up to 33dB. By adjusting their fit, I can allow more sound to come in. I do understand the value of allowing sounds in. My other pair of plugs are ER*20xs High-fidelity earplugs. Their noise reduction rating is 13dB. I fit them with the large 3-flange ear tips. 

Normally, the ER*20 plugs are my 'go to' plugs. They allow me to hear more sounds than the heavy duty foam plugs. I use the foam plugs for sirens, screaming babies, racing motorcycles, etc.

Enjoy your weekend,

Michael



0
Rob

Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #12 

Michael – 

You are working at cross purposes with yourself.  Working with broadband noise, sleeping with a sound machine or some other softly-played, neutral background sound, and exposing your auditory system to as many environments as you can handle, are all good ways to improve hyperacusis.  But using hearing protection as you do will make you more, not less, sensitive to sound.  There are studies on this sort of thing.  A good review of these studies is included in the book Hyperacusis and Disorders of Sound Intolerance (2018) edited by Marc Fagelson and David Baguley.  Using hearing protection at bedtime is the most counterproductive thing you can do if your goal is to improve your tolerance of sound.     

Please don’t misunderstand where I’m coming from.  I completely understand why you want to use hearing protection as you do.  I have been in your shoes.  When I developed hyperacusis, some people’s speaking voices were physically painful to hear and other voices could be uncomfortable to hear.  The number of normally-encountered, typical sounds that were painful to hear was extraordinary.  I’m suggesting that you educate yourself about hyperacusis, hearing protection, and management strategies, to help you make decisions that will be in your own best interest.  In that regard, I suggest you find a clinician who is knowledgeable about hyperacusis and experienced in helping patients manage the condition.  Discuss all your views and concerns with him or her.      

As for using broadband noise for eight hours, I suggest you not use pink noise at bedtime.  It would be much better to use it for eight contiguous hours during waking hours, no matter how inconvenient or challenging it may be.  The wearable broadband noise generators used in TRT are specifically made to make it more convenient to users (who wear these devices in or behind the ear).  

It was nice of you to contact KFOregon. 

To edit your post, login, click the "Edit" link located below your post, make your changes, and click the Save button located below your post.  Good luck with everything!

Rob 

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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #13 
Hi, Rob.

I do understand what you describe regarding my wearing protection while I sleep. I understand how it might be slowing my recovery.

I also understand that high decibel sounds can injure/damage hearing. I do suggest that my snoring is so loud that it actually causes me (and my wife, who also wears earplugs in bed) injury if I (we) do not wear some sort of protection. [My wife does not suffer hyperacusis.] 

While I am new to this forum, I have known about - and researched this issue - for many months. I'm no expert, but I'm reasonably informed IMHO. I came here to learn more and to further my recovery.

With all due respect, I will not cease wearing protection while I sleep until a better solution is available. Wearing protection may well slow my healing, but the alternative is not acceptable and non-negotiable. I have been known to be stubborn. There is a mouthpiece which may curb my snoring, but that won't be tried until after I have finished a bit of oral surgery that I am having done. Your suggestion to not listen to pink noise while one sleeps is different from what I recall reading before. Are you suggesting one not listen during sleep, or are you suggesting there is a different system to try during sleep?

I'll look for Hyperacusis and Disorders of Sound Intolerance but it may be a while before I am able to buy it as I will be overseas for a while. Thank you for recommending it. [thumb]

As for editing: Correct. That is exactly what I did all three times. Perhaps my browser is the culprit; perhaps it is something else. I will just let it be. Whomever reads this thread will understand there was a misunderstanding, and that we tried to make amends.

Michael


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dylan

Moderator
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Posts: 139
Reply with quote  #14 
The moderators have edited mresseguie's post #5. 
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KFOregon

Registered:
Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #15 
mressequie and Edogg:,
I Saw all the posts.
Thanks for the effort fellas. I don't mean to cause any drama.
Feel free to pm any time
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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #16 
[headbang][smile][wave]

Excellent! I'm relieved.

Now let's tackle this frustrating thing called hyperacusis.

I'm trying to reduce my earplug usage one baby step at a time, and increase my pink noise time.


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mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #17 
Rob,

I hope you see this reply.

I don't doubt it must be frustrating to urge someone to stop doing something - wearing earplugs while I sleep in this case. I dug my heels and wouldn't budge because I knew I was right and that you didn't appreciate how loudly I can snore.

Well, guess what? I took a nap about 10 days ago and forgot to use my earplugs. When I awoke from my nap, I realized I hadn't used the earplugs. My ears felt okay, so I asked my wife if she had heard any snoring. My wife told me I snored like a banshee for the 20 minutes I was asleep. She thought a window would shatter because I was so loud.

Hmm. Interesting, I thought to myself. Perhaps, I will try sleeping at night (just once!) without earplugs just to see how it works. That night, I nervously decided to hit the sack without protection. I woke up once to pee, but I slept soundly till the morning. 

Shock and horror! My ears were okay. My snoring didn't screw up my hearing nor did it wake me up in the middle of the night. I'll be damned!

I have slept each night without earplugs since then and I have not detected any problems because of it.

Thank you for urging me to try it, and for not resorting to anger when I stubbornly refused to try your suggestion. 

Regards,

Michael 
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janeygirl

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Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #18 
Please don't go, Rob is one of the nicest guys you will ever know and he cares. He has helped so much of us and I'm glad you expressed yourself but please do listen to Rob and others, we are here to be of support to you, we all try.


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Jane Parks-McKay
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HST

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #19 
hi
can someone tell how  I am adding my new post in this chat site?

__________________
HYPER IS ATOM PAIN
TINITUS IS  NO PAiN BUT FANTOM
I am ht
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Johan_l

Registered:
Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mresseguie
Hello, all.

I just joined and thought I ought to say hello. Like many of you, I have tinnitus and, unfortunately, hyperacusis. My tinnitus isn't so bad that it drives me crazy, but I'm just 58, so it's got another 30(?) years to get worse. I'll adapt.

My hyperacusis hit me beginning about 2.5 years ago. I was in a small, enclosed space where music was being played very loudly. I was exposed very briefly - perhaps just 2 minutes(?). However, it was enough to cause damage.

It wasn't too bad for the first year or so. I was careful to avoid overly loud amplified music and I kept my distance at outdoor concerts. I carried earplugs for those 'too loud' situations. 

Then, about 18 months ago, my wife and I were at a friend's dinner party. One of the other guests and I were having a conversation when he blasted me with his LOUD laughter from just 2 feet away. I felt it immediately. It was as if someone had hit me with a 2X4. I knew right away that he had damaged my hearing. From that day on, I was very sensitive. I used earplugs practically everywhere I went. Walk into a store - pop 'em in. Doorbell rings...pop 'em in before opening the door. I snore really loudly, so I pop 'em in as I lay down to sleep. 

No matter how careful I was; no matter how good the earplugs were; no matter how creative I got with avoiding loud noises, my hyperacusis kept getting worse. My sensitivity kept increasing. I began having "bad ear" days. They usually followed a dinner party, or really loud people blasting their voices near me. I'd have two bad ear days where I just wanted to hide and not talk to anyone. By the third day, I was okay. I could deal with life again.

Not surprisingly, this was all very difficult for my wife. She didn't understand what was happening to me. Initially, she thought it might be all in my head. [Well, it IS all in my head, but you know what I mean.] Over time, she has learned to accept that it is real, and she tries to avoid clanking plates and speaking too loudly too closely to me ears. I'm very fortunate to have this person as my friend in life. [personals_heart]

Fortunately for me, I got creative with my Goggle searches and stumbled on the Hyperacusis Network in July of this year. I was pretty desperate for a cure, so I gladly paid the $$ and bought a thumb drive with pink noise. I have listened to pink noise for anywhere from 30 minutes to three hours nearly every day since it arrived in the mail. This has made a huge difference in my life! Yeah. I still suffer setbacks, and there are still some bad ear days, but I can go out in the world now without shoving earplugs into my ears every time I see/hear children screaming, women shrilly laughing, and sirens blaring.

Pink noise has given me a much needed second chance to be nearly 'normal'. I'm still healing, and I have high hopes that I will continue to improve. Being able to read posts from fellow sufferers sure helps. It's nice to know I'm not the only one.

Thanks for reading my introduction.

Michael




Always encouring to read success /improvement stories! What kind of H symptoms did you have?  Amplification and/or pain?
0
HST

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #21 
HI, how can i put new massage?
__________________
HYPER IS ATOM PAIN
TINITUS IS  NO PAiN BUT FANTOM
I am ht
0
mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #22 
Hello, HST.

You asked, " HI, how can i put new message?"

If you are posting from this website, look to the top of the page. You ought to see "The Hyperacusis Network > Categories > New Messages > First Post". On my screen the letters are blue and are underlined. Click on "New Messages" or "Categories". You will see other discussion threads which you may post to.

I hope this helps you.

Regards,

Michael
0
mresseguie

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johan_l




Always encouring to read success /improvement stories! What kind of H symptoms did you have?  Amplification and/or pain?


Johan,

My symptoms are/were high sensitivity to loud noises. It felt/sounded as though someone directed a megaphone into my right ear. There wasn't pain per se. It was very uncomfortable and I would physically back up to gain a little distance from the offending noise. 

In addition to pink noise therapy, I sought out a Chinese Medicine Doctor for herbal medicine and acupuncture. Acupuncture is very effective, but one must get the treatment 3 or 4 times per week for several weeks to really get good results. I take the herbal medicine every day. Its effect is more subtle, but I notice a difference.

Michael
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