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mgc

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #1 
I have H & T. Currently, I am using Simplicity sound generators to treat the H first.

I am looking for positive experiences regarding major dental drilling. I know that Jack Vernon recommends so many seconds on and so many seconds off. So here are my questions:

Is it ok to use sound generators during dental drilling?

I believe that ear plugs are not to be used for dental work, is it ok to use Zem db31 headset or Bose quiet 15 headset (noise canceling)? 

Are there any recommendations for dentists who use quiet drills? I live in Central New Jersey. What is a quiet drill?  ( I know that there are air abrasion techniques, but I believe that they are only for small cavities.)
How can I go about finding a dentist who uses a quiet drill?

I welcome any other helpful suggestions. 








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winterbridge55

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Posts: 70
Reply with quote  #2 
I too have h/t and recently went to a dentist for some drilling. I brought my plugs just in case. He drilled for a few seconds and then stopped to determine if it was too loud. It was not. So he proceeded to finish the job which was only a minor bonding procedure. Upon going home I did not have a spike and my h remained stable. If it had been a more lengthy procedure I think I would use my musician earplugs rather than my regular ones because I think hearing some of the drill would mix with the sound of bone conduction and not make it sound as loud. As far as the headphones go I would bring those too. It is better to go with all of this and make sure the dentist understands that this is important to find out just what you can tolerate. The gentle drill you are referring to may be a laser drill. They are virtually quiet but can only be used on new cavities but the newer drills are not that loud.  Maybe you will get some Novocaine and the tinnitus will go away for a few hours. At least that is what I have heard. Hope this helps a little.

-Mark

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mgc

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #3 
@Mark
Thank you for sharing what I needed to hear. I know that others have shared their experiences on this message board, but I do  enjoy hearing timely, fresh thoughts.

Louise
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aQuieterBreeze

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Posts: 2,083
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi mgc,

I wonder if like other sound we may need to, choose to, or happen to be around  sometimes
it can make a difference how sensitive one is to sound at the time, as to how well it is tolerated?
So to go in on a day that one is  doing fairly well if possible, verses when one's hearing/ears are a lot more sensitive than what is "normal" (for a person with these challenges) at the time, would seem to be a good idea if possible. (To me anyway)

And I wonder (depending on one's own situation and how sound affects them)
if it may be helpful to avoid situations that are known to be quite difficult soundwise (such as those likely to cause a setback) for a bit before that, if possible?

Weather one decides to do that or not,
One thing I would suggest is to try to schedule some time for after your appointment to be able to  take it easy, in a somewhat quiet (though not necessarily silent) and relaxing environment.
Verses a noisy/loud  one. 
For someone with these challenges, I think it could be helpful to allow for some quiet time and relaxation -  to see how one is doing afterward  - before being around other sound / noise that may be too difficult at that time.

Hopefully you will not need the quieter environment and/ or  time  to recover, and can just enjoy some peace and relaxation -
but to allow some  time for it, and have a place that would be fairly quiet so one is  not
 around sound that would be too difficult at that time -  is something I think may be helpful.

Though we are all different in what we are able to tolerate,
 I have found  that being able to take it easy soundwise, after exposure to sound that is too difficult, whatever the source of the sound is -  can be very helpful.

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cbBen

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Posts: 1,378
Reply with quote  #5 
If you think exposure to the dental drill is risk-free, think again.  I'd at least look into laser dentistry.  Three and a half months ago I had a very bad experience with exposure to noise from drilling on my oral appliance (the drilling was not inside my mouth).  The noise to which I was exposed absolutely would not have harmed a non-hyperacusic person.

The assertion that hyperacusics do not have a lower threshold for damage does not match my experience at all.  The flaw in the assertion is in how "damage" is defined.  And as for the proverbial "additional health challenges," it bears pointing out that one can't know in advance whether one has one of these elliptically-referred-to conditions.  So if the standard does not apply when an "additional health challenge" is present, then the standard is worthless.

I have had a significant and longstanding increase in discomfort.  I have excruciating pain even in silence (and please, no lectures on avoiding silence; I mean near silence).  I have had a longstanding worsening of tolerances. 

I have had a longstanding inability even to tolerate ear plugs or ear muffs beyond a few minutes' time.  Living as I do in a city overwhelmed by constant loud sirens and loud honking, at all hours of the day and night, I am now essentially homebound. 

To know that my cochlea and hearing are none the worse for wear is the coldest comfort in the world.

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mgc

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #6 
@aQuieterBreeze
Thank you for your helpful suggestions.

@cbBen
I used to be too frightened to even get on this website. I am getting less fearful.
When I read your post, it struck fear in me. I did my TAT healing modality on this fear. Now, when I re-read your post... I see your kindness, helpfulness, and a beautiful intellectual capacity in your sharing, as well as your willingness to be vulnerable. Thank you. 
This is a wonderful, gentle reminder to me that e-mails sometimes take on the resonance of my own inner voice.   
 
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Debbie

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Posts: 1,512
Reply with quote  #7 
Louise,

I appreciate what you shared so honestly about your reactions to CbBen's candid post. I can see both how it could have been problematic for you to read and also how your experience of his input could change depending on your focus.
I think that's a really profound point.
We perceive each others' messages through our own filters;
a huge component of the messages we receive reflects what we are primed to receive.
If you don't mind saying, how are you currently feeling about going to the dentist? 
And what is TAT healing modality?

Debbie



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mgc

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #8 
@Debbie
I am working on freeing myself from my dental fears, so I can have the most positive outcome. I do use TAT as a self-help tool and it helps me tremendously. I am not a TAT practitioner, and I taught it to myself. TAT is an easy way to dissolve current stressors in my life, limiting beliefs, and negativity. You can use it to let go of traumas/issues without judgement, analysis, or reliving anything. You should only do TAT for 15-20 minutes a day and you need to drink water. You hold certain acupressure points on your head while putting attention on a set of freeing and empowering intentions.
http://www.tatlife.com has a free booklet (be sure to read the disclaimer).  I taught it to myself and I have had great results. 
I have TAT'ed on: 
Whatever is getting in the way of me habituating the tinnitus, 
Whatever ..... way of me not be afraid of loud noises,
My perceived fear that tinnitus is a threat, 
My perceived fear that hyperacusis is a threat,  
The most influential trauma underlying my not feeling safe and secure, etc.

I read from the TRT book by Jastreboff and I find statements to put in my TAT bundle, such as:

Whatever is in the way of me giving myself permission to experience "Habituation can be facilitated by a decrease in the strength of the tinnitus signal, achieved by the proper use of sound therapy." (See page 106 of TRT book)

If anyone decides to use it, let me know if it works for you. I just did a quick 2 minute TAT in a store earlier today when I was experiencing a minor auditory meltdown. I calmed myself down and I was able to continue shopping for some great outdoor gear. Also, if anyone is interested I can post some free audio TAT sessions that I have taken on fear, extended family, emotions. But before one does these audios, you must read the disclaimer in the free TAT booklet.

The beauty of all this is my husband is starting to noticie the positive baby steps that I am taking. He said that he is feeling more hopeful. And this is a good thing.

In kindness and love,
Louise



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Debbie

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Posts: 1,512
Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Louise,

I'm glad to hear you are able to move in a positive direction.
Thanks for your explanation of TAT.
It sounds like TAT is in the same family of approaches as EFT and MTT, other simple acupressure-based protocols for self-care.
I will look up TAT because I have often found EFT to be helpful for me and others.

Debbie

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Rob

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Posts: 4,049
Reply with quote  #10 

Is it ok to use sound generators during dental drilling?

 

Yes.

 

I believe that ear plugs are not to be used for dental work, is it ok to use Zem db31 headset or Bose quiet 15 headset (noise canceling)? 

 

Yes.  It is also OK to use earplugs if you find they are helpful to you.  You are the only one who can determine that.

 

I welcome any other helpful suggestions. 

 

Of the things a hyperacusic has to deal with, going to the dentist is very low on my personal list of stuff to be concerned about.  I’ve figured out what works for me.  You will too.  There is always a way forward.  Contrary to popular belief, there is nothing wrong with using earplugs provided they are helpful.  They were to me.  Without them, the high-pitched sound was painful, particularly when I had very low LDLs.  I’ve also tried Bose QC 2 headphones, but prefer properly inserted earplugs.  I have the Bose 15’s but haven’t tried them at the dentist as yet.  They are better than the QC2, so would likely be better at the dentist too.

 

rob 

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Marilyn

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Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbBen
If you think exposure to the dental drill is risk-free, think again.  I'd at least look into laser dentistry.  Three and a half months ago I had a very bad experience with exposure to noise from drilling on my oral appliance (the drilling was not inside my mouth).  The noise to which I was exposed absolutely would not have harmed a non-hyperacusic person....

...I am now essentially homebound.


Hi Ben, I'm so sorry you've had a bad set back.  I've been missing you here on the message board.  What does your TRT doctor say?  I sure hope you are seeing some improvement now.

I had a bit of another set back Friday.  I ran two fans in the living room and kitchen about 7 hours.  I did this last summer without any problems, but I wore ear plugs then.  Yesterday I had a bad H headache and the tightening of my stampedius and tensor tympani muscles.  Of course, I had a delayed pain reaction.  I feel like I'll never learn to not take for granted a new sound won't hurt me.  It's hard not to get discouraged, but we'll all encourage each other.  You'll be in my thoughts and prayers.
Warmly,
Marilyn

P.S.  Sorry this post was off topic.  MGC, I've had dental work done successfully, and I'm a category 4 hyperacusic.  I haven't had a tooth filled, but had bonding re-applied and my regular teeth cleanings.  "Going to the dentist dread'' takes on a whole new meaning with H, doesn't it?  Best to you!

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