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sshear

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Reply with quote  #1 

We have a child with sound sensitivity problems. Flushing the tolet, School bells, Fire alarms, Gym baseketball alarm, Students cheering loud in the gym.

Any suggestions what we can do or buy to help him out?

Where can white or pink noise be introduced and help? If so, what cd's are out there to help this problem? Thanks!

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Dekay

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Reply with quote  #2 

1. How old is your child?

2. Has your child seen an ENT Doc. ?

3. Is he diagnosed?

 

Pink noise sound generators I believe must be prescribed and pink noise C.Ds can be purchased from this website, actually. Seeing as his age, he may not want or comply by listening to that horrifying static for hours. I myself am a "child", legally unfortunately still, and I don't mind the treatment of pink noise as a solution.

 

(P.S. It sounds as your child is suffering from Hyperacute hearing not SSS. Alose, white noise may be very painful for some hyperacusis pt.s, as it has a blend of all frequencies.)

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sshear

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Reply with quote  #3 

He is six. Would a ENT be able to diagnose his and help him adjust or get over this loud sound painful problem to our son?

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Dekay

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Reply with quote  #4 

Most likely yes, and you should also mention your belief that he has hyperacusis. If not, he will referr you to a sound therapist that probably can; tinnitus specialist.

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Reply with quote  #5 

Can you tell us a bit more about how long the child has been this way?  Was it a sudden onset or gradual, or always there?

 

Little children often respond really well to sculpting their sound environment, i.e., using fishtanks, fans, water fountains, air-cleaners, etc. to gradually and pleasantly increase the ambient sound level in the home, including the bedrooms and living areas.  Using sound in this way, various natural sounds, is a wonderful and easy approach that does not even need to be discussed with the child, simply installed.

 

Children like fish tanks!  They love gold fish and guppies and the tubes and filters bubble and whoosh and this is a nice broad band sound....pumps hum....

 

It is important to maintain this sound sculpting day and night.  Keep those items on 24/7 in other words, and also of course bring more auditory stimulus to his world, music cds, books on tape, piano lessons?, singing, camping trips by streams or waterfalls, tv is not such a great sound producer and often the content is questionable, but live music events in the parks, at the theater, things like that, perfect!

 

Please do consult the otologist if you can find one, and the audiologist.  Small children can tell us quite a bit about their sound tolerance in the sound booth when the audiologist uses a happy face-serious face-sad face picture board to point at....and mom or daddy can sit in the booth with them, if needed. 


Some six year olds are very brave and like the whole process and enjoy pushing the buttons, too.

 

Best of luck in your journey.  Using the above ideas, it may be a few months before you notice any big differences. Changing the landscaping of the auditory threshold does take time.  Be persistent and pleasant about the process, and reassure him when the loud sounds do come along, that his ears are fine!

 

Personally, I have been in public bathrooms where I would estimate the sound of that flushing at about 100 decibels or greater!  I don't like it, either!

 

Marsha Johnson, M.S.

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ConcernedMom

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm so glad to finally have some 'answers' about my son.  I know that I need to go the doctor and get the ball rolling, but we've been going through the same thing with my 5 year old.
He had chronic ear infections as a baby.  At around 18 months - 2 years he had surgery to remove his tonsils, adenoids and have tubes put in both ears.  That's when it all started.  The first time we took him out to dinner when he was feeling better he was amazed at the sounds around him and we were tickled to think that he was finally hearing everything this world has to offer.  Unfortunately, over time, he grew more and more sensitive to certain sounds.  The funny thing is that not EVERYTHING sets him off.  He is fine with the vacuum, blender, lawnmower and such, but when at a restaurant we can't sit near any ice machine because he can't stand the sound of the ice dropping.  We have problems at amusement parks because some of the sounds of the rides set him off.  Even at the state fair he was ready to go after ten minutes.  Everything came to a head over the last few days.  Tuesday they had a fire drill at school.  He always takes 10 - 15 minutes to calm down after a drill and then all is well.  Ever since Tuesday he has gotten so upset that he cries just THINKING about the POSSIBILITY of having a fire drill at school.  Both Wednesday and today (thursday) he got so upset thinking there was going to be a fire drill that he cried and cried and made himself throw up.  I'm worried the same thing will happen tomorrow.  We have a hard time getting him to go see musical concerts, but he loves music.  Most times we have to sit him on our lap and hold our hands over his ears for him to even sit through the show.
I will be making a dr appt for him soon and hopefully we can begin to get him the help he needs.

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Dekay

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Reply with quote  #7 

Your son is only experiencing irritability with only "CERTAIN" sounds is because he has a light case of SSSS. I too had many ear infections as a baby, and that's the only time I had them. Now that I'm older, the problem has progressed to the point where I can't watch TV,talk to freinds,go to a movie theatre, attend study group, or anything remotely fun that would define me as a teen. I don't have too much more time to allow me to do so; It's best to get treatment and not deferr tit.

 

(p.s. I had been recently watching videos of myself during my childhood, and noticed that I had used to cover my ears with my hands when I could't tolerate certain sounds. Does this sound familiar?)

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Darcy

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Reply with quote  #8 
Dekay,

Quote:
You posted (in part):
Your son is only experiencing irritability with only "CERTAIN" sounds is because he has a light case of SSSS.


With all due respect, this sounds like you are diagnosing and I question that you are qualified to do so.

Darcy
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Dekay

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Reply with quote  #9 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darcy
Dekay,

Quote:
You posted (in part):
Your son is only experiencing irritability with only "CERTAIN" sounds is because he has a light case of SSSS.


With all due respect, this sounds like you are diagnosing and I question that you are qualified to do so.

Darcy

 

No I'm not at all, heck I don't even like audiology/ENT.( Go anethesiology!). I was just reffering to her saying

"The funny thing is that not EVERYTHING sets him off"

It seemed as if she was wondering why that is, and it is empirical to me that I understand the situation(somewhat).

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Darcy

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Reply with quote  #10 
Dekay,

Thank you for the clarification.

Darcy

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