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glwhite13

Registered: 01/24/06
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,
I'm having a health problem unrelated to my tinnitus, and a doctor suggested an MRI. (I would have to go in head-first.) I'm really hesitant to have and MRI because a previous experience caused a permanent increase in the volume of my tinnitus. I didn't use the full possible ear protection for that one -- just the headphones supplied to me and no ear plugs. So I know I could protect myself better. But my tinnitus is so loud that I'm wary of taking any chance it could be worsened.
Does anyone know if an MRI is safe providing the ears are fully protected?

Gary 
Rob

Registered: 05/02/05
Posts: 3,655
Reply with quote  #2 
Gary,

Bring earplugs with you and take the MRI.  You will be fine. 

Rob
olms

Registered: 07/27/05
Posts: 276
Reply with quote  #3 
Gary,

Here is some data on MRI sound level.

Also, a group which says it can reduce level of the MRI by 97%.

Might want to contact the group's number, call and ask which cities in your state have MRI's sound reduction equipment.

My solution was, five years ago, I didn't take the MRI because of my H. I ask doctor what alternates there were, and she said ultra sound, to see about spot on my kidney. We did ultra sound, and a few months later, did a 2nd, no growth, no problem.

Have had no problems with my kidneys in five years now, so didn't need the ultra sound. It would have just caused more problems.

You'll have to decide. They'd have to kill me first to get me in an MRI or a CT scan machine.

                      Tom



08/21/07 at 08:58 PM Reply #3


Jacsal:

Here is my post of a month or so back.

One of the parts you might want to note is that there is a phone number as to which cities in your state have mri machines which are advertised as 97% more quiet than regular MRI machines.

I would think, if you decide to take the MRI test, that you would want to contact those people and ask which cities in your state have the supposed much quieter MRI machines.

You could then ask you insurance company or your doctor if you can get approved for the quieter machIine. You might have to pay x amount more for that machine, but it could be worth it. I would at least find out about the monitary difference is.

Tom

 

7/23/07 at 09:37 PM

Here is a report on the decibel level of the MRI machine which doctors often ask patients to have when trying to determine a medical problem.

One medical problem doctors don’’t consider is hyperacusis, because they don’’t know anything about it.

Therefore they will send a hyperacusis patient into a machine that is 100 to 110 decibels loud, or the same volume as a chain saw. So, in trying to determine one medical problem, they can very well create another.

So, everybody has to figure out what’’s best for themselves.

H patients might want to consider two numbers before undergoing an MRI exam. One is, what is their noise tolerance level, based on the sound level chart listed on the home page of this website?

Mine is conversational level, or about 70 decibels, as I recall that number. So, I cannot tolerate any noise. Now, if my sound tolerance level is 70, and the MRI exam machine is 100 to 110 decibels, do I want to take an MRI? Keep in mind. The doctor doesn’’t know either of those numbers, and doesn’’t know what h is.

One website said earplugs might reduce the loudness of a MRI to 80 decibels. Would you put in earplugs and over-the-head ear protectors and sit by a chainsaw for 20-40 minutes? (The chain saw number for the MRI [both 100-110 decibels] is according to this hyperacusis website’’s sound level chart, listed on this site’’s home page.)

There is a firm in Philadelphia which claims they have reduced the sound of the MRI by 97 percent, as I mentioned in a post about 2 months ago.

Their free phone number for which states have noise reduction MRI machines is 1-800-736-8003. The 3 states I checked for, each had at least 3 cities which had these machines. So, they appear to have the U.S. covered, and perhaps other countries.

If a medical center near you does have such a machine, ask them what your insurance will cover. I don't know if these machines are as quiet as they say, so everyone has to make these decisions on their own.

I think the way they reduce the loud sound of the MRI is the same way that BOSE reduces sound with their electronic headphones. That is, incoming sound waves are largely reduced by matching outgoing sound waves.

I've got some of those headphones, and I know they work. They can dull a sound very well.

I would guess they might hook a larger scale, BOSE anti-noise device onto the loud parts of an MRI machine. It would send out equal but opposite sound waves which counteract the noise coming from the loud MRI. That's quite an improvement.

My former doctor, who at the time was dying of some illness, and who I consider the most sensitive doctor I ever had, suggested a CT scan when there was a spot on my kidney. Knowing the machine could be loud, I told her I wanted to hear the machine first. I really wanted someone to go in there with a sound meter, but couldn’’t work that out.

So, I went in like an idiot, just to hear it from 20 feet away behind a glass partition. They turned that sucker on and I thought I was dead. Gosh. I ran out the door. I estimate it at 85 decibels, and it was way more than I could tolerate. And the MRI is 100 to 110 decibels, for 20 to 40 minutes.

My doctor said I could take an ultra sound for my kidney, a quiet test, and then 2-3 months later, take a 2nd ultra sound, to see if there was any growth. There was no growth, a CT scan was not needed. You pay your money and you take your chances.

Here is what it said on page 6 of about a 20-page report.

I think this firm is involved in sound-proofing, so they want to tell how loud the MRI is, whereas none of the other 30 or more sites I saw would give away that secret information. They have drawings of how to sound proof (or sound dampen) the machine.

The website name is: http://www.ets.lindgren.com/pdf/accoustic_manual.pdf

I found it on the search engine typing in: mri decibels

After the 6 or 8 ads at the top of the first page that came up, it was the 3rd listing titled, "LMCL 1.02 accoustics manual"

On page 6 or so of that manual, it said this:

"With the introduction of more powerful

gradient coils on today’’’’s high field MRI

scanners,MRI equipment is producing

increasingly high noise levels.During a

typical scan sequence,many newer MRI

systems will produce average sound

pressure levels (SPL) as high as 100 to 110

dBA,with peak levels of 120 dB————which

compare to busy street traffic noise levels.

"These high scanner noise levels can

interfere with patient comfort, patienttechnician

communication, and staff

working efficiency.

"During a scanning procedure, the patient is

located at the epicenter of the resonator

module (which is comprised of the magnet,

RF and gradient coils).While the patient is

exposed to the noise for only a short time,

technicians and other staff are subjected to

long-term noise exposure.

"Moreover, the noise can travel from the

MRI room into adjoining rooms and

corridors, thereby disturbing other

building occupants.

Consequently, acoustic shielding or

suppression is required in many newer

MRI installations, particularly in such

sites as:

•••• New building complexes where

adjacent suites will be affected

•••• Older facilities for which MRI was not

the original purpose

•••• Hospitals and clinics, for which noise

suppression specifications often exist

The first step in planning for acoustic

shielding is to gain an understanding of

noise sources and sound transmission."

So, this decibel level of an MRI is a rare find.

Tom

janepm

Registered: 08/21/05
Posts: 1,645
Reply with quote  #4 
if you can still go back to last year's archives and look on the dialogue for MR Tekkie, you may glean some wisdom there.

But bottom line: if you can do a catscan vs. an mri for whatever you want to find out, better. BUT MRI's are entirely possible to get through. However, you would want to take your good good earplugs and if the test will allow it ahead of time (call the Doctor, call the facility, get a written rx from your Doctor asking them to let you do what you need to do), take some ear muffs with you. I have the Thunder 29's, however, they don't make them anymore.

I prefer to take my own stuff. The first time I had mri's two years ago with just earplugs, it was horrid, I had Hyperacusis all summer. The second time, I used plugs and my Thunder 29's and I did fine.

Also, keep carbs and sugar to a minimum before the mri, you have to stay very still and you don't want sugar shakes.

All spoken from experience by me!


__________________
Jane
olms

Registered: 07/27/05
Posts: 276
Reply with quote  #5 

Gary:

If I was going to take the MRI or the CT scan, which I would not since my tolerance for sound is that of conversation or 70 decibels, according to this site's sound level chart, I would at least call the firm in Philadelphia.

They claim to be able to reduce the level of sound in the MRI 97 percent.  

Their free phone number for which states have noise reduction MRI machines is 1-800-736-8003.

The 3 states I checked for, each had at least 3 cities which had these machines. So, they appear to have the U.S. covered, and perhaps other countries.

If a medical center near you does have such a machine, ask them what your insurance will cover. I don't know if these machines are as quiet as they say, so everyone has to make these decisions on their own.

I think the way they reduce the loud sound of the MRI is the same way that BOSE reduces sound with their electronic headphones. That is, incoming sound waves are largely reduced by matching outgoing sound waves.

I've got some of those headphones, and I know they work. They can dull a sound very well.

I would guess they might hook a larger scale, BOSE anti-noise device onto the loud parts of an MRI machine. It would send out equal but opposite sound waves which counteract the noise coming from the loud MRI. That's

 quite an improvement.

 

                                       Tom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

                              

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